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NAPCE News – September 2020

NAPCE News – September 2020

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

Pastoral care in schools across the UK and further afield is proven to be critically linked to the academic and personal-social development of young people. NAPCE continues to support education providers in the process of pastoral care implementation and development.

It is here that we share important news of our latest activities, events and best practice guidance. 

AWARDS: The First Ever NAPCE Awards Takes Place in September 2020, Here’s the Programme & Ticket Link for the Online Ceremony

NAPCE AWARDS PRESENTATION 2020

Ahead of the first NAPCE Awards 2020 ceremony, which is taking place online because of social distancing needs, we’re delighted to share the programme for the event.

We’re also pleased to share the ticket link (below).

A large number of tickets have already been snapped up and the remaining spaces are now available to the general public on a first-come-first-served basis.

For general information about the Awards click here https://www.napce.org.uk/napce-awards-2020-finalists-announced/

Thursday 24th September – 7.00pm (via Zoom)

6-45 pm Guests gather on video conference for pre event drinks

7-00pm Introduction and Arrangements for the Evening – Victoria Bownes, National Executive Member and Host for the Evening presented from Lambrook School in Berkshire. 
Highlights Video of Pastoral Care in 2020

Welcome Phil Jones, The National Association for Pastoral Care, National Chair, Address – Recognising Achievement in Pastoral Care

Guest Speaker, Geoff Barton, Association of School and College Leaders, General Secretary  – Geoff studied English and Linguistics at the University of Lancaster, then trained to teach at Leicester University. From 2002 to 2017 he was headteacher of King Edward VI School, Bury St Edmunds, a 11-18 school of 1650 students. He is a Founding Fellow of the English Association and patron of the English & Media Centre. He was a longstanding member of ASCL Council, founding chair of its Pedagogy Committee, and a ‘Leading Thinker’ for the National Education Trust. He was elected as General Secretary of ASCL in April 2017 and is a regular guest on BBC News, speaking on a range of education matters.

Awards – Nominations for each category and Announcement of Winners, Victoria Bownes

Closing Remarks, Professor Stan Tucker, Editor Pastoral Care in Education

Vote of Thanks – On behalf of NAPCE – Victoria Bownes
Good Luck in the new academic and we look forward to hearing of your successes in pastoral care over the course of the year.
 
Invitation to the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education
On Thursday 24th September 2020
Starting at 7-00 pm. Please join us for pre event drinks from 6-45pm
Where: Zoom

Topic: NAPCE AWARDS PRESENTATION 2020
Time: Sep 24, 2020 06:00 PM London
 
To book tickets: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/presentation-of-the-national-awards-for-pastoral-care-in-education-tickets-113448278856?aff=ebdssbonlinesearch

INSPIRATION: “Thoughts on Pastoral Research” by NAPCE’s Journal Editor Stan Tucker

 

Some Thoughts on Pastoral Research

Like me, you have probably been listening to and watching various news broadcasts concerning the return of children and young people to school for the new academic year.

One of the major themes of the broadcasts has focused on how the return will impact on the health and wellbeing of those concerned.

For it is fair to say that COVID19 has radically changed the lives of many school-aged children. Even if we consider for a moment the way in which space in school is now being utilised, how different if must feel to sit apart from friends, be continually mindful of the need for social distancing, as well as observing the behaviour of teaching staff as they try and avoid close contact with their students.

Regular readers of Pastoral Care in Education will know that many of our research articles take as their specific focus the wellbeing and mental  health of children and young people in schools.

However, in watching the story of COVID19 unfold, I have become increasingly conscious that research on the impact of the virus is something that is being promised for the future.

It also concerns me that we are likely to only hear about data gathered through large quantitative studies.

So, here is my question: Is there value in those working in schools undertaking their own research into the experiences of children and young people returning to school post-COVID19? I am not talking about a large scale study, but the construction of a number of case studies at the level of the individual school (or of course you could work in partnership with other schools to compare and contrast experiences).

There are all kinds of ways that these studies could be produced – text, video, photographs etc. The voices of young people and staff could be captured, or the diary entries of a member of staff might prove to be illuminating.

NAPCE would be interested in facilitating the production of such materials. Don’t forget also that Pastoral Care in Education has space for the publication of ‘thinking pieces’ where staff, or children, or both, can express their views and talk about their experiences. Or of course you could write something for this newsletter.

If you are interested in discussing your ideas contact me on: s.a.tucker@newman.ac.uk

Stan Tucker
Editor, Pastoral Care In Education Journal

September 2020

 

BOOK REVIEW: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones on “Beyond Wiping Noses” by Stephen Lane, a New Book on Pastoral Leadership in Schools.

Beyond Wiping Noses – An informed approach to pastoral leadership in schools. Book review. 

This new pastoral book written by Stephen Lane (also known as #SputnikSteve on Twitter) was published this month by Crown House Publishing Limited.

It is good to see that a growing interest in pastoral care is resulting in an increased discussion about pastoral issues on social media; more articles and research being presented for publication in journals, including NAPCE’s journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ and more books on pastoral topics being published.

The author comments in the book that with the increased focus on mental health and well-being, along with the increase in concerns over cyberbullying and the negative effects of social media, that pastoral care is arguably more important than ever.

This book makes a significant contribution to raising awareness about the contribution effective pastoral care can make to a young person’s educational experience.

It increases understanding about how the pastoral work of the school helps young people to make sense of their education and lives as a member of society.

At the heart of the book is a call for a more informed and evidence-based approach to the organisation and delivery of pastoral care in schools.

It has always been a belief of NAPCE that research informs good practice. In the days before Twitter and the internet, NAPCE was an important forum for members to share good practice and a meeting point for research and debate about good practice.

The book encourages the view that this process is still important even if NAPCE like many other organisations has had to adapt in response to new technology and ways of working.

In many ways the book is a breath of fresh air for NAPCE members and supporters who for many years it seems have been fighting an uphill battle to ensure that pastoral work in schools is valued and recognised for the impact it can have on a young person’s achievement at school and in later life.

The foreword by Mary Myatt recognises the contribution made by the late Michael Marland, who was a founder member of the NAPCE, in raising awareness about the impact of effective pastoral care.

I can remember sitting next to Michael Marland in NAPCE meetings and being aware of his passion and deep-rooted belief that pastoral care was an important part of education.

Unfortunately, that has been challenged in recent years by a focus on examination results and accountability and it is encouraging now that there is a growing awareness about the contribution pastoral work can make to the achievement of young people and this book contributes to this process by developing the readers’ understanding of pastoral issues in schools.

There is a clear structure and organisation to the book with different topics being explored in each chapter in a sensible and balanced way taking advantage of available literature and evidence for each area.

The book provides the reader with guidance on sources of information and resources that can be used to support the planning and delivery of pastoral care in schools.

Each chapter includes a conclusion with a summary of the issues and gives suggestions on how schools and staff working in pastoral roles should respond.

Stephen includes his own thoughts and experience in what he describes as “a reflection of the journey I have taken towards a more informed response to pastoral matters”. (Lane, S. 2020, p5)

There is a focus on secondary schools in the book, which is the author’s own experience, but the issues explored are relevant to professionals working in primary, tertiary and higher education and will develop their understanding and encourage them to reflect on their own policy and practice.

In the introduction the author makes a case for a research-based approach using evidence for the planning and delivery of pastoral care. Stephen comments on how he discovered the NAPCE journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’.

“immediately I began to see ways to improve my practice in relation to pastoral issues and by extension to improve the experience of the students in my care” (Lane S 2020 p 5.)

In chapter one the book focuses on pastoral roles in schools. It recognises that there can be a lack of clarity about pastoral roles and that they can become reactive and instinctive. He examines the role of the Form Tutor, Head of Year or Middle leader, School Chaplain, School Counsellor and Pastoral Leader in a context where he makes it clear that all adults in a school  have a pastoral duty and that pastoral work is not “wiping noses and kicking butts”.

“Napce does a decent job in encapsulating the plethora of particulars involved. It also succeeds I think in traversing the potential false dichotomy between the pastoral and the academic” (Lane S 2020 p 12.)

He recognises that the NAPCE guidance places a strong emphasis on personal development, which is one of the four key areas in the current inspection framework.

He supports the NAPCE guidelines, placing a strong emphasis on the importance of the skills, knowledge and understanding of staff including the suggested requirement that staff;
“Take responsibility for remaining fully informed about developments in pastoral care and in education that have an impact on the support of learners in schools” (Lane S 2020 p13.)

He examines the plans for a designated Senior Lead for Mental Health in Schools and points out the importance of this being properly resourced and given a high status, which is something that all areas of pastoral work in schools would benefit from. The book argues that it is important for schools to have a clear vision for pastoral roles and that this should be used to inform job descriptions.

In chapter two the book asks the question what research can inform the development of pastoral structures and systems and the delivery of effective pastoral care.

 “In order to achieve effective pastoral care for the welfare, well-being and overall success of our students and enable them to participate -pastoral leaders must embrace and engage with the current movement in educational discourse towards a research and evidence informed practice”. (Lane, S, 2020 p21).

The author argues the case for policies and procedures and daily practice to be based upon and informed by ongoing critical engagement with research and evidence.

He informs the reader about the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research in pastoral care. In examining the difficult task of defining pastoral care the book uses contributions form NAPCE members.

These include Michael Marland and the ideas presented in his 1974 book That introduced the concept of pastoral care being about the ‘crisis of identity faced by adolescents; what do I want to make of myself and what do I have to work with’. (Marland 1974). The book uses the article by a former NAPCE president Ron Best in 2014 which argues that Marland’s book had a significant and long-term impact upon ideas about pastoral care. (Best R 2014.)
“As the founding chair of NAPCE, Marland’s influence should not be underestimated” (Lane, S, 2020p p30)

To explore definitions of Pastoral, the book  uses the work of another member of NAPCE’s National Executive Committee , Mike Calvert, who in 2009 pointed out a shift away from the term Pastoral due to its ecclesiastical or agricultural roots and associations with outdated notions of power dependence and models of schooling.

The author points out that even within the pages of the journal – Pastoral Care in Education, it is difficult to locate a clearly recognisable definition. This is a fair comment and reflects the challenges of finding a definition which, from my experience, have been a feature of many discussions and debates at NAPCE’s National Executive and Editorial Board Meetings.

Stephen does respond to the readers’ need for a definition by referring to the first edition of the journal and an article from HMI Eric Lord who provided the following definition;
“the bridge between education and life is best made by those who can help the young to find their way among the exhilarating interests, the satisfactions and the baffling ambiguity of human existence”. (Lord 1983 p 11)

The book also uses a definition from Mike Calvert which he summarises as, “the structures practices and approaches to support the welfare, well-being and development of children and young people”. (Calvert, M, 2009, p267).

It is good to see it recognised in the book, that all the discussions at National Executive, Editorial Board and in the Journal have enabled NAPCE to contribute to developing understanding about pastoral care.

“The NAPCE has its own journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ which includes a range of papers on various topics and also publishes special themed issues” (Lane S, 2020, p35)

In chapter three the author argues for the need for a ‘knowledge rich pastoral curriculum’. The book provides examples of organisations and sources for resources that can support schools in planning and delivering a pastoral curriculum.

The chapter explores the various approaches to delivering a pastoral curriculum and questions the messages that are really passed on to young people. An approach is encouraged where schools are clear about what they include in their pastoral curriculum and about the key messages that it gives to learners.

This is important if pastoral leaders are not going to leave it to chance which good habits, moral values, and personal characteristics that the learners in their care pick up.

It is seen a part of the pastoral leaders’ role to make decisions about what should be incorporated into a coherent pastoral curriculum and to be clear about the messages that are given by the hidden curriculum which is defined as the unwritten values, perspectives and beliefs that are transmitted in the classroom and around the school.

The focus in chapter four is on the challenges of preventing bullying. The reader is provided with an overview of literature about bullying in school and recognises the important contribution made by the Journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ in developing understanding about this issue to inform policies and practice.

The teacher’s role is explored along with the impact of new technology and in particular social media. The reader is provided with a useful summary of intervention strategies and approaches to prevent bullying in a school setting.

Well-being, and mental health are current concerns for schools and the potential cause of the apparent rise in mental health issues and the role of the school is examined.

The impact the school may have, by the pressure it places on learners to succeed because of the schools need to be accountable for their examination results is highlighted. Once again, the reader is provided with resources and sources of information for raising awareness about mental health issues and planning interventions and support.

The writer suggests that schools can improve learners’ self-esteem and their mental health by ensuring that they have experience of success. This has important implications for how the school provides a positive culture and ethos for learning and supports the personal development of its learners.

In chapter six the book explores different approaches to managing behaviour including controversial topics such as isolation booths. There is a well balanced and sensible discussion about the use of restorative practice to and other strategies that can be used to manage behaviour in schools such as ‘warmstrict’, which is described as a modern manifestation of tough love.

By examining different theoretical and ideological perspectives the writer, makes comments and suggestions that will develop the understanding of pastoral staff and encourage them to reflect on their own procedures and practice.

The reader who is looking for practical guidance is not forgotten and the writer shares ideas about practical steps that can be taken to improve behaviour.

The focus in chapter seven is on the recent interest in what has been called Character Education. Definitions of Character Education are explained and different approaches to implementing it as part of the curriculum are shared with the reader.

The literature is used to explore different approaches to Character Education and the reader is signposted to resources and information There is a recognition that Character Education is a contentious topic and this is highlighted by the writer in exploring the available literature. One suggestion highlighted is that character education is needed in schools because the current school system with its focus on examination results does not fully prepare young people for their future lives.

“They suggest that the current schooling system focused as it is on examination results leaves young people with insufficient resilience and fewer coping strategies that they will need in later life” (Lane S, 2020, p111)

In the next chapter the writer, bravely in my view, tackles the current issue about remote learning during the pandemic. The challenges for schools in the short term are difficult to predict and It is not clear what impact the pandemic will have on learning in the future.

The chapter provides the reader with an opportunity to reflect on the recent experience of schools and what implications this might have in both the short term and long term for young people’s education. There has been increased awareness of the work schools do through their pastoral structures and systems to support young people and look after their well-being.

It is frustrating that a global pandemic was needed before the huge difference pastoral staff make, every day by supporting young people and motivating them to achieve their full potential, was recognised and valued.  The writer reports on how schools have continued to take their pastoral obligations seriously and how quickly they have adapted to find new ways to support the learning and well-being of the young people in their care.

The book makes an important contribution to developing understanding about the important impact the pastoral work of the school has on supporting learners on their journey through school and in preparing them for their future roles in society. It makes a clear case for a cohesive pastoral curriculum that is planned, using available evidence and research.

“Teachers must be encouraged to engage in the theoretical and philosophical debate around teaching in order to continually test their practice and so move it towards daily praxis” (Lane, S, 2020, p.126)

This has been the goal for NAPCE since it was first formed in 1982 and this book highlights the important link between research, policy making and practice which has been at the heart of NAPCE’s work for nearly 40 years.

Phil Jones
National Chair
The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

References 
Best, R. (2014) Forty years of pastoral care: an appraisal of Michael Marland’s seminal book and its significance for pastoral care in schools. Pastoral Care in Education, 32(3): 173-185
Calvert, M. (2009) From ‘pastoral care ‘to ’care’: meanings and practices. Pastoral Care in Education,27(4): 267-277.
Jones, P. (2019) National guidance for pastoral support in schools. NAPCE (3 April). Available at https://www.napce.org.uk/national-guidance-for-pastoral-support-in-schools/.
Lane, S. (2020) Beyond Wiping Noses. Building an informed approach to pastoral leadership in schools, Carmarthen: Crown House Publishing.
Lord, E. (1983) Pastoral care in education: principles and practice. Pastoral Care in Education,1(1):6-11.
Marland, M. (1974) Pastoral Care. London: Heinemann

ARTICLE: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones Responds to Guardian Headline “Children in the UK are the Unhappiest in Europe”

 

“Children in the UK are the unhappiest in Europe”

This was the headline in The Guardian newspaper on Friday 28th August 2020.

Although decisions in education are not normally driven by whether young people are happy or not this report being published, as it was just before schools returned for a new academic year, in the middle of a pandemic, encourages pastoral staff to reflect on the experience of young people in school.

It was reported that more than a third of 15-year olds scored low on life satisfaction in the annual ‘Good Childhood Report’, from the Children’s Society.

Children in the UK have the lowest levels of life satisfaction across Europe with a particularly British fear of failure partly to blame, according to the report.

The UK children fared badly across happiness measurements, including satisfaction with schools, friends, and sense of purpose, when compared with children from other European countries.

The rise in UK child poverty and school pressures were cited alongside the fear of failure as reasons why only 64% of UK children experienced high life satisfaction, the lowest figure of 24 countries surveyed by the OECD.

This situation is not just the responsibility of schools and there are implications in these findings for society and how it supports the development of children in preparation for their future lives.

The well-being concerns about young people cannot be solved by pastoral systems and structures on their own, but by taking time to think about the purpose of pastoral support in school, they can make an important contribution.

One of the most important findings is that young people in the UK today feel that they have no sense of purpose.

Is this perhaps because in many schools today, the role of the Form Tutor is not valued as it should be as being important for supporting young people to make sense of their learning experiences and to raise their aspirations for their future roles in society?

Is it because far too often tutor time is a wasted opportunity?

Time is allocated to administrative tasks and activities such as revision and not to the important interaction, between a Form Tutor and a learner, to provide guidance and motivation.

I would suggest that these findings support the argument that schools, if they are going to meet the needs of the young people they care for, need to invest and value their pastoral structures and systems more.

The pastoral work of the school can sometimes be focused on solving problems to enable the ‘more important’ work to take place, of delivering the curriculum and achieving improved percentages in measurable outcomes.

This is not the schools’ fault, but a result of the emphasis placed on academic outcomes in holding them accountable.

The findings reported by the Guardian suggest that this approach is contributing to the negative feelings of young people, by placing more pressure on them to achieve better results.

In this situation, is it not even more important to ensure, that all young people have access to guidance and effective pastoral support?

The role of pastoral systems. in supporting personal development, is not just about improving outcomes but it is important for encouraging positive attitudes and the personal skills that will enable young people to take full advantage of their education and prepare themselves, for their future lives and roles in society.

The data for the report was collected before the pandemic, so I would argue that the need for the pastoral work of the school to be given the value and status that is deserves is urgent, as it is likely that the challenges schools will face in supporting young people are likely to increase.

Pastoral systems have a vital role, by developing cultures in schools that raise the aspirations and ambitions of all learners, if these findings are going to change for the benefit of the young people in the UK in the future.

Please share your thoughts and ideas on the challenges being faced by professionals working in pastoral care on the Twitter page NAPCE@NAPCE1

Phil Jones
National Chair
The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

NAPCE News – September 2019

NAPCE News – September 2019
Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

Pastoral care in schools across the UK and further afield is proven to be critically linked to the academic and personal-social development of young people. NAPCE continues to support education providers in the process of pastoral care implementation and development. It is here that we share important news of our latest activities, events and best practice guidance. 

THIS MONTH’S FEATURE ARTICLE: “The Importance of the Student’s Voice” by NAPCE’s Jill Robson

I was interested to read Professor Stan Tucker’s Editorial in the June 2019 edition of “Pastoral Care in Education”, in which he considers the recent youth protests on climate change and the issues of children’s rights and empowerment.

He asks an important question, “When we talk of the importance of “listening”, of “enabling” of “facilitating”, of “empowering”, are we willing to accept within such discourse the right of a child to take action if/when they believe adults are failing to respond to their needs, perspectives or ambitions.

This is an interesting point, as a teacher of over 30 years, I was always an advocate of student voice and established and developed Student Councils in several of the schools in which I worked, often with opposition from colleagues, who did not share my views on extending the democratic process to students.

My legitimisation of the process always extended to quoting Article 12 of the United Nations Declaration on the rights of the child, which states that children have the right to have views and be consulted on issues which affect them.

In today’s world of instant access to information via the Internet, there are numerous resources available to teachers and pastoral staff on how to set up and run democratic student councils, but my concern, based on my own experience and discussions with school staff is that often the school or student council is still seen as a peripheral or add on activity.

Even in schools where students are involved in staff appointments and other strategic decisions, the views of students are not always given due consideration, unless they reinforce the accepted view.

I have recently been involved, as a governor of an SEMH school, with their school council.  The students are at the school, as they found it difficult to cope in mainstream schools, however their ability to discuss and present their views and contribute positively on all school issues is incredibly impressive and has reinforced my view on the importance of student voice for all young people.

I believe that students are an underused and undervalued resource in many schools and that their opinions, contributions and actions are essential components in the drive for school improvement.

If we are going to use their views to shape policy and actions however, we need to be prepared for them to voice concerns and opinions and to take action that isn’t always in agreement with the organisations existing philosophy and practice.

At a time in our country’s history when the democratic process is constantly under discussion and so many voters do not participate in elections,  it is essential that we encourage all young people to express their views, and that we give those views and consequent actions, due respect.

Jill Robson
National Executive Committee
NAPCE

AWARDS: NAPCE joins forces with UK Pastoral Chat to launch the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 

NAPCE is delighted to have joined forces with UK Pastoral Chat to launch an exciting new awards scheme for pastoral care providers in the education sector.

It was announced at our conference in May that NAPCE had plans to promote good practice in pastoral support and recognise the work that is being done to develop good quality pastoral care, through the launch of the NAPCE Awards.

Since May we have been in discussions with UK Pastoral Chat, who have a similar interest in recognising good practice in pastoral support, about working in partnership for an awards programme.

So, we thought it made perfect sense for both organisations to work together in partnership to create the first ever National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.
 
Both NAPCE and UK Pastoral Chat will have their own categories for the awards and will manage their own process for entry, finalists and selection of awards winners.

Of course, working in partnership means the Awards instantly becomes a much bigger event, with a bigger audience and we’re going to be combining our energies and expertise to organise an awards programme that significantly raises the profile of pastoral care in the educational world.
The closing date for all categories (both NAPCE and UK Pastoral Chat awards categories will be Monday 2nd March, 2020.

The finalists of the inaugural National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education will be invited to attend a ceremony in 2020 and we’ll be announcing details of the event shortly.

UK Pastoral Chat is inviting nominations for awards in the following categories;

  • SLT
  • Head of Year (Including Head of 6thForm)
  • Head of House/Head of Boarding
  • PSHE Lead
  • Nurse/ Counsellor
  • Pastoral Support Staff (including Learning Mentor)
  • Tutor/Classroom teacher
  • Unsung Hero
  • Guidance teacher
  • DSL/CP Co-ordinator
  • Governor

Details about how to make nominations can be found on the UK Pastoral Chat Twitter pages.

NAPCE is inviting nominations in the following categories;

  • Pastoral School of the Year
  • Pastoral Team of the Year
  • Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
  • Pastoral Leader of the Year
  • Pastoral Development of the Year
  • Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
  • Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care

Nominations are encouraged for awards in different categories from schools and educational institutions. The Awards will be an excellent opportunity to share good practice in pastoral care and through the social media and websites of both organisations to raise awareness of where pastoral support is making a real difference in the educational experience of young people. The awards will encourage new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and will recognise the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

This is an opportunity to recognise the impact the work of pastoral staff is having on the achievement and well being of young people. The decisions about prize winners in each category will be made by a panel of invited professionals who work in pastoral care.

There will be a prize of £100.00 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

The criteria for the NAPCE awards are;
Award Criteria

  • Pastoral School of the Year

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school

  • Pastoral Team of the Year

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

  • Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

  • Pastoral Leader of the Year

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

  • Pastoral Development of the Year

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

  • Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

  • Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care.Nominations for the NAPCE Awards are welcome from member schools and institutions and from schools and institutions that are not currently members of NAPCE. Nominations can be made online via this link:

https://iainnapce.wufoo.com/forms/zxzr4y71g2ofzi/

You can also enter by e-mail to NAPCE Base at admin@napce.org.uk with the following information:

Award                          __________________________________________

Nomination                  __________________________________________
Support for nomination (maximum 100 words)

Nominated by _______________________________________________

Email contact _______________________________________________

The Awards Programme and partnership with UK Pastoral Chat is an exciting opportunity to raise the profile of Pastoral Care and give hard working pastoral staff and schools with positive approaches to supporting learners the recognition that they deserve.

Good luck!

Phil Jones
National Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

Article: “Cyberbullying – What schools and teachers can do” by internet security company ESET

The dramatic and, often dangerous effects of cyberbullying is an issue we cannot afford to ignore.

The impact of cyberbullying has widely and regularly been reported in the media and too often we are seeing the results being a serious effect on the mental health to young people, sometime even leading the suicide.

At NAPCE we are committed to sharing information about cyberbullying, in terms of evidence, case studies and effects.

We also seek regular advice on how, as education providers, we can support our young people and each other with instances and circumstances of cyberbullying.

Earlier this month we discovered a summary of advice on the issue from award. winning global internet security company ESET.

Here is the article, written by Cecilia Pastorino. It was published on the ESETblog welivesecurity on August 23rd, 2019.

Cyberbullying: What schools and teachers can do

These days, the internet is woven into people’s everyday lives, and children’s lives are no exception. For all its benefits, the technological evolution has also brought, or magnified, some problems, and cyberbullying is one of the most pervasive threats that youth face online. In fact, when a kid starts to be bullied at school, the harassment usually continues on social networks, messaging apps, and elsewhere on the internet. Educational institutions may think that the issues of the digital world lie outside the scope of schooling or that they don’t warrant scrutiny. However, online abuse and harassment often have a bigger impact on the victims than in-person bullying – and yet they may be ignored until it’s too late.

Importantly, on the internet everything can become more powerful. A social media post can reach hundreds or even thousands of people in a matter of minutes and before you know it, all those people may be talking and expressing opinions about the post or image. The impact of abusive content on the victim is magnified when there’s an increase in the number of people seeing, liking, sharing, and/or commenting on the post. Indeed, if the content has gone viral, it’s impossible to stop or delete it, even if the aggressors come to regret their actions.

On a related note, the sense of decreased inhibition afforded by screens and social networks due to the sense of anonymity may make many kids feel empowered enough to say and do things in the digital world that they would never do in the physical world.

Against this backdrop and as way to encourage a proactive approach in tackling cyberbullying and other types of online harassment, here are four principles that every school and teacher can apply in order to deal with this problem:

1. Educate students to be good digital citizens

Since the digital world is part of our real lives, the rules that apply on the internet should be the same as those we are already familiar with in the physical world. When teaching kids about respect and social conventions, it’s important to include the realm of the internet and ensure that they are also taught how to behave and communicate through digital media.

Subjects like civic education and citizenship should go beyond traditional boundaries to touch also on ethics, morality and respect in the digital world. Team exercises and activities are another powerful way to get groups to work together as one. The purpose of such activities is to get all the members of the class to work together toward a common goal, using all their individual strengths and valuing each person’s abilities to complete a task.

2. Prioritize awareness-raising over banning

Awareness is very powerful, not least because it changes social perceptions. Rather than creating panic over the use of technology or spreading misunderstandings, awareness allows a positive atmosphere to emerge.

Many schools choose to ban the use of technology, which can actually backfire in that pupils and students will use their phones on the sly. Young people identify with technology and adapt it to fit into their daily lives. That’s why it’s important to show students how they can use technology for the common good, such as to share knowledge or to support one another. Furthermore, by bringing technology into the classroom, teachers can focus on its ethical use.

3. Collective solidarity in reporting cyberbullying

A report by the Safe2Tell initiative found that, in 81% of cases of bullying at school, some group of students would have known about an attack, but would have decided not to report it. In most of these cases, the silence is mainly due to the fear of becoming the next victim or of facing punishment by adults. In these cases, children need to know that the problem is not technology, but rather people using it for the wrong ends. Promoting free-flowing dialogue and providing a space for listening also contributes to children knowing who to turn to if faced with abusive behavior.

On the other hand, online abuse can, and should, be reported on the platforms themselves. All social networks have the option to report posts, comments and even profiles that harm or harass someone. This is the only way to eliminate abusive content on social networks, because after a series of reports are received, the post or profile is deleted. These reports are completely anonymous, so there is no need to fear retaliation.

4. Dialogue: the basis for all support

Students need to know who they can reach out to before a problem arises. And in this area, trust is the key to open a dialogue. A recent survey (in Spanish) found that 25% of children and teenagers believe their elders know less than they do about technology. This perception makes them feel that their online problems are played down and not understood. What happens on the internet is viewed by children as very serious. Their digital identities are essentially the same for them as their real-world identities. For that reason, if a student approaches a teacher or other responsible adult with an online problem, the teacher needs to take it as seriously as a similar real-world issue and seek out the resources to deal with it.

It’s important to remember that while youngsters know a lot about how technology is used and how it works, adults have more real-life experience. With this in mind, exploring topics like technological risks, safety on the internet and appropriate online behavior are vital to encouraging dialogue. And it’s essential to break the silence around bullying and cyberbullying, by talking about instances of cyberabuse and their solutions. In doing so, teachers need to be clear and empathetic and to communicate openly with their students.

In conclusion, if we view digital communication as part of each person’s own little world, we can apply these thoughts expressed by Eleanor Roosevelt:

Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.

MEDIA WATCH: A round-up of the latest news stories involving pastoral care in education

At NAPCE we work very hard to stay across the national and international news media to store and share the latest stories involving pastoral care in education on our own platforms.

In this new feature for NAPCE News, we are sharing with you a selection of the biggest stories hitting the headlines this month with the aim that some of these reported developments may provide useful context within your work as a strategist or practitioner of pastoral support.

Here is a summary for September 2019.

“Poor pupils nearly twice as likely not to pass maths GCSE as richer peers, analysis reveals” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/gcse-results-day-2019-maths-english-pass-poor-students-a9071741.html

“Pastoral care tips for the new academic year” from Independent Education Today

Read here: https://ie-today.co.uk/Blog/pastoral-care-tips-for-the-new-academic-year/

“Children without bed of their own or enough clothing struggle at school, report warns” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/child-poverty-school-attendance-food-banks-clothes-bed-buttle-uk-a9090006.html

“Almost one in five children have contemplated suicide because of bullying at school, a new study of 1,003 students has revealed” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/school-suicide-children-bullying-anxiety-back2school-a9088341.html

“‘My pupil was expelled for breaking a teacher’s fingers. I have to help him” from The Guardian

Read here: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/sep/09/pupil-expelled-breaking-teachers-fingers-help-tutor

“Teacher: Depression and anxiety threatened to kill my career. So I came clean about it” from The Guardian

Read here: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/sep/10/depression-and-anxiety-threatened-to-kill-my-career-so-i-came-clean-about-it

“Facebook and Instagram tighten rules on self-harm images” from The Guardian

Read here: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/10/facebook-instagram-tighten-rules-self-harm-images

“Off to ‘big school’? Some pupils need extra support, says Ofsted” from BBC News

Read here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-49661576

“Top teacher warns on mental health time bomb over autism training from News Letter

Read here: https://www.newsletter.co.uk/education/top-teacher-warns-on-mental-health-time-bomb-over-autism-training-1-9069439

“The BBC is launching a new app to try and help the wellbeing of young people online” from BBC News

Read here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/49738120

“Bullying behaviour often emerges in childhood, and the consequences for victims can last a lifetime. But what makes a child become a bully?” from BBC News

Read here: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190913-why-some-children-become-merciless-bullies

NAPCE & UK Pastoral Chat launch National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education

NAPCE is delighted to have joined forces with UK Pastoral Chat to launch an exciting new awards scheme for pastoral care providers in the education sector.

It was announced at our conference in May that NAPCE had plans to promote good practice in pastoral support and recognise the work that is being done to develop good quality pastoral care, through the launch of the NAPCE Awards.

Since May we have been in discussions with UK Pastoral Chat, who have a similar interest in recognising good practice in pastoral support, about working in partnership for an awards programme.

So, we thought it made perfect sense for both organisations to work together in partnership to create the first ever National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

Both NAPCE and UK Pastoral Chat will have their own categories for the awards and will manage their own process for entry, finalists and selection of awards winners.  Of course, working in partnership means the Awards instantly becomes a much bigger event, with a bigger audience and we’re going to be combining our energies and expertise to organise an awards programme that significantly raises the profile of pastoral care in the educational world.

The closing date for all categories (both NAPCE and UK Pastoral Chat awards) will be Monday 2nd March, 2020.

The finalists of the inaugural National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education will be invited to attend a ceremony in 2020 and we’ll be announcing details of the event shortly.

NAPCE is inviting nominations in the following categories;

Pastoral School of the Year
Pastoral Team of the Year
Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
Pastoral Leader of the Year
Pastoral Development of the Year
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care

You can enter the NAPCE categories here http://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards

Nominations are encouraged for awards in different categories from schools and educational establishments and you DO NOT need to currently be a member of NAPCE to take part.

UK Pastoral Chat is inviting nominations for awards in the following categories;

SLT
Head of Year (Including Head of 6thForm)
Head of House/Head of Boarding
PSHE Lead
Nurse/ Counsellor
Pastoral Support Staff (including Learning Mentor)
Tutor/Classroom teacher
Unsung Hero
Guidance teacher
DSL/CP Co-ordinator
Governor

You can enter the UK Pastoral Chat awards categories here surveymonkey.com/r/MGPBSW9

The Awards will be an excellent opportunity to share good practice in pastoral care and through the social media and websites of both organisations to raise awareness of where pastoral support is making a real difference in the educational experience of young people.

The awards will encourage new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and will recognise the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

This is an opportunity to recognise the impact the work of pastoral staff is having on the achievement and well being of young people.

The decisions about prize winners in each category will be made by a panel of invited professionals who work in pastoral care.

There will be a prize of £100.00 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

The criteria for the NAPCE awards are;

•Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school

•Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with

•Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success

•Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with

•Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people

•Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people

•Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care

Nominations for the NAPCE Awards are welcome from member schools and institutions and from schools and institutions that are not currently members of NAPCE

You can also enter the awards by e-mail to NAPCE Base at admin@napce.org.uk

The Awards Programme and partnership with UK Pastoral Chat is an exciting opportunity to raise the profile of Pastoral Care and give hard working pastoral staff and schools with positive approaches to supporting learners the recognition that they deserve.

Good luck!
Phil Jones
National Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

NAPCE May Conference 2019 – A Report

Conference- “Facing the Challenges of mental health and well-being in schools. Let’s talk about it!”

May 8th, 2019, Birmingham

Summary of Analysis of Evaluations from Delegates

Delegates completed a questionnaire to provide feedback at the end of the conference. There were 85 delegates at the conference. The responses to the evaluation show that delegates came from a wide range of backgrounds including primary school teachers, secondary school teachers, headteachers and leaders in secondary schools, non – teaching pastoral staff in schools, people working in higher education, people working in teacher training and organisations that included the Wildlife Trust, BBC Bitesize and Aston Villa Foundation. Speakers came from Birmingham Educational Partnership, Newman University, Ofsted, ASCL, Mind, Squirrel learning, Compassion Matters, Newman Health and Well-being, and NAPCE. In addition, displays were provided by the Thrive Approach and Services for Education

Delegates were positive about the experience they had at the conference and about how they had benefited from attending.  The comments show that delegates found the conference useful and that the information that was shared with them and the understanding they developed, would have a positive impact on their future work

  • It was really informative and lots of ideas to take back to school
  • Great update on national picture and progression and hurdles with mental health in schools and wider society
  • Lots of information to think about and incorporate into our academy
  • I learnt so much and it gave me time to start formulating my thoughts so I can start preparing my action plan
  • Very informative, Thought provoking and inspiring
  • So much knowledge to take back home to think about and share at work
  • The information given today can only help me and the staff I work with to support the young people we work with and each other
  • Helped me to focus on the national picture not just my school setting. Gave me time to think and network with others.

One theme that emerged from the conference was the importance of a whole school approach to promoting mental health and well-being in schools.

  • Raising awareness about the need for a whole school response to emotional well being
  • It raised awareness about the importance of a whole school approach to mental health issues and well-being in schools.
  • It has helped me to think about the importance of a whole school approach
  • Learning new approaches to developing a whole school approach.

Delegates appreciated the different information presented, with speakers focusing on current practice, national issues and developments, research and ideas and strategies to respond to the challenges that schools face.

  • I thought the balance of information was good
  • Great update on national picture and progression and hurdles with mental health in schools and wider society
  • Range of ideas to take back to school and implement
  • Lots of information to think about and incorporate into our academy
  • Made connections between different models of pastoral care and current practice learnt about the most up to date evidence and policy

Delegates were positive about the knowledge and understanding they gained from the speakers and workshop leaders. Without exception all the speakers and workshop leaders were mentioned as being the highlight of the conference by different delegates.

  • Wide range of speakers all relevant to theme but providing different perspectives
  • The speakers created a whole picture of what we need to strive for. It all fitted together
  • Each speaker contributed to my understanding and each one had a highlight. A Valuable day
  • The wide range of speakers that brought different perspectives to the table
  • Different speakers from different areas of expertise
  • I found all the speakers and the workshops to be of great interest

Delegates feedback about the venue for the Conference, The Studio in Birmingham was very positive. They liked the location especially because it was close to the station and the food and facilities. There were a few comments about it being difficult to get to central Birmingham by car for a 9-00am start.

  • Excellent regarding room and food. Busy getting into central Birmingham for 9-00am
  • Great venue and food
  • The venue was perfect for the event
  • Excellent venue, nice food, great location
  • Very accessible. Clean tidy and fabulous hospitality
  • Amazing venue. Good facilities, good food, quirky design and excellent location close to the station

Delegates were positive about NAPCE’s organisation of the event. Suggestions for the organisation of future conferences included, providing more time for delegates to discuss issues and share good practice and to ask questions and make comments. The responses show that delegates valued the opportunity to network and share ideas and good practice with other delegates.

  • Nothing needs to be done to improve the conference. all was excellent
  • The organisation of the conference was very thorough
  • Arrange further conferences they are excellent
  • I thought the balance of information was good and at a very reasonable price.
  • NAPCE is addressing important areas and kept the conference interesting
  • The organisation of the conference was all very clear, and the conference fulfilled its aims effectively
  • More discussion time, but I did appreciate the breadth of content and appreciate time constraints
  • Provide time for delegates to talk and discuss. To comment and ask questions after each presentation
  • More time to talk in workshops
  • Workshops to be more interactive. More practical ideas and strategies
  • More practical ways and strategies that we can use for our pupils e.g. signs of mental health issues, various types of condition and ways to support
  • Opportunities for networking and sharing free resources, as schools do not have the money for lots of these things
  • Opportunities to share good practice on tables
  • Maybe more resources or an information sheet on where to find support

Delegates made some suggestions for issues and topics that could be explored in future conferences.

  • More about strategic approaches in school
  • Mental Health strategies to use in the classroom
  • Working with pupils with SEND
  • Supporting disaffected/alienated pupils
  • Case studies and best practice as group discussions
  • Use of pupil premium funding to support pastoral care. Links between pastoral needs and wider SEND needs
  • Relationships with parents
  • Managing pastoral care in a digital environment including social media
  • Developing Pastoral teams. Good practice models.

Delegates made the following general comments about their experience at the conference.

  • I really enjoyed the day and found it to be wholly engaging
  • Enjoyable and informative day. Thank you and very good value for money
  • A useful and stimulating day
  • I found it all very useful and well planned. A valuable day
  • Thank you for a very positive day
  • Fantastic day Very appropriate that the conference related to mental health. I have felt very valued and left the venue feeling very much looked after. Thank you
  • An enjoyable and useful day
  • Well done to all involved it was fantastic
  • Brilliant Day. Thoroughly enjoyable and informative

Thank you to all speakers, workshop leaders, organisers of displays, staff at The Studio NAPCE members and all delegates for your contribution to the success of the conference.

Phil Jones
National Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

Summary of the response by the National Association of Pastoral Care (NAPCE) to the OFSTED consultation on the proposed new Inspection Framework to be implemented from September 2019.

Proposal 1: Introduction of ‘Quality of Education’ Judgement

We propose the introduction of a new ‘quality of education’ judgement built around our working definition of the curriculum. It will focus on a provider’s educational intent, implementation and impact.

Inspectors look at teaching, assessment, attainment and progress under the current inspection framework, and they will continue to do so, but these considerations will contribute, viewed in the context of the provider’s curriculum, to a single quality of education judgement.

In short, we propose to take a holistic approach to considering the quality of education rather than artificially separating the leadership of the curriculum from teaching, and separating teaching and the use of assessment from the impact this has on the outcomes that learners achieve. This will de-intensify the inspection focus on performance data and place more emphasis on the substance of education and what matters most to learners and practitioners.

This will encourage a greater focus on the experience that young people have at school. The Association welcomes this because it will encourage schools to consider all the experiences, they provide for their students through the curriculum to broaden their educational experience, support their personal development and prepare them for taking an active role in society in the future.

Proposal 2: Separation of Judgements

We propose to judge ‘personal development’ separately from ‘behaviour and attitudes’ to enhance the inspection focus on each and enable clearer reporting on both.

This approach recognises the very different elements in focus. We believe that the behaviour and the attitudes learners of all ages bring to learning is best evaluated and judged separately from the provision made to promote learners’ wider personal development, character and resilience.

We support the increased focus on Personal Development as a step in the right direction and believe that will encourage schools to value the work done by staff, to promote the personal development, well – being and resilience of learners.

It will encourage all schools to consider the well – being of staff and students to ensure their readiness to learn and the opportunity to reach their potential.

The Association will continue to explore opportunities to recognise and celebrate good practice in Pastoral Care. The focus on personal development proposed in the new framework will support this process.

Proposal 3: Early Years

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Proposal 4: Increasing Short Inspections from One day to Two days

Currently, section 8 inspections of good schools (or ‘short inspections’) last for one day. We want to ensure that there is opportunity to gather sufficient evidence while on inspection to confirm that a school remains good under the new criteria. Therefore, we are proposing to increase the time for which the lead inspector is on site to two days.

We welcome this proposal because it will ensure that schools focus on the personal development of learners. It will mean that inspectors have the time to enable them to make sound judgements about all the educational experiences that are provided for academic achievement and personal development.

Proposal 5: On-site Preparation

We propose that Ofsted will provide formal notification of the inspection no later than 10am on the day before the inspection. We then propose that the lead inspector will arrive on site no earlier than 12.30pm on that day. The lead inspector will use this time to talk with senior leaders in order to gain an overview of the school’s recent performance and any changes since the last inspection.

We would welcome any developments in the process that enables improved communication between inspectors and the school but have concerns that this would put additional pressure on school staff as they prepare for the inspection visit. An inspection is a stressful experience for school staff and leaders must allocate time to supporting colleagues with their preparation including their emotional wellbeing.

Proposals 7 and 8 are specific to non-association independent schools.

Proposal 7: Quality of Education Criteria

We propose that inspectors should normally use the non-specialist curriculum as their primary source of evidence in assessing the extent to which non-association independent schools meet the quality of education criteria.

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Proposal 8: 

To provide parents, school leaders and the DfE with better information, we are proposing to recognise and acknowledge sooner where schools have improved or declined, for example by bringing forward a standard inspection.

To what extent do you agree or disagree that where non-association independent schools have been found to improve or decline at an additional inspection, Ofsted should provide up-to-date judgements about the school’s current performance?

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Proposals 9, 10 and 11 are specific to further education and skills

Proposal 9: 

We propose to reduce the types of provision that we grade and specifically report on.

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Proposal 10: 

We are proposing to refine our short inspection model for further education and skills providers.

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Proposal 11: 

We are proposing to extend the timescale within which we should inspect providers judged to require improvement from ‘normally 12 to 24 months’ after the last inspection to ‘normally 12 to 30 months’ after the last inspection.

NAPCE did not respond to this proposal

Phil Jones
Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

April 3rd 2019

 

For 37 years the National Association or Pastoral Care in Education has been leading the discussion on pastoral care in schools across the UK and further afield.

We are now pleased to release our latest National Guidance (2018) document to deliver a clear framework for professionals working in pastoral care across the education sector.

Pastoral Leadership

Effective pastoral leadership with a clear purpose and direction

  • Develops an ethos which promotes learning, academic achievement and personal development.
  • Encourages learning experiences that meet the needs and raises the aspirations of learners.
  • Establishes clear goals for supporting the academic progress and personal development of learners.
  • Provides opportunities for learners to develop social skills and personal qualities to prepare them for their future lives.
  • Implements guidance and support strategies to raise achievement
  • Evaluates how effective pastoral support is and plans actions to improve provision.
  • Plan and provides appropriate training and professional development opportunities for staff engaged in pastoral support.
  • Manages the provision of high-quality tutoring to encourage and motivate learners to achieve their full potential.
  • Implements pastoral systems to identify barriers to learning and appropriate strategies to overcome them.
  • Develops effective communication between all parties involved in the education of learners.
  • Provides a safe and stimulating learning environment that supports the personal development of all learners.
  • Ensures early intervention and support for individual learners when it is required.

Pastoral Outcomes

Achieves pastoral outcomes that support and promote learning

  • Learners are motivated to improve their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to prior attainment.
  • Learners through their behaviours and attitudes, contribute to establishing a positive environment for learning.
  • Learners understand how they can be effective learners, make good academic progress and promote their own personal development and welfare.
  • Learners take advantage of opportunities and learning experiences provided by the school and they are enthusiastic about learning and positive about their academic achievement and personal development.
  • Learners are confident about responding to challenges they face in their education.
  • Learners can work effectively with other people and are developing the skills needed for future employability.
  • Learners know how to access support to enable them to achieve their full potential.

Effective Pastoral Teams

Develop pastoral systems and structures that ensures a shared commitment to supporting learners in their education, personal development and well – being.

  • Have a common purpose to support learners in achieving their full potential.
  • Understands the needs of learners and how to ensure an appropriate balance between challenge and support.
  • Develops effective links between all staff and other professionals who contribute to the education of individual learners.
  • Are involved in the development and evaluation of pastoral systems and strategies to meet the needs of all learners.
  • Demonstrate and promote an enthusiasm for learning which inspires and motivates learners.
  • Develop a culture with high expectations for achievement and an awareness of the importance of well – being.
  • Through effective tutoring and guidance, challenge learners to achieve their full potential in their academic progress and personal development.
  • Form effective partnerships with parents and carers to support learners in their academic progress and personal development.
  • Are aware of appropriate resources and contacts to support learners
  • Recognise and celebrate the achievements of individuals and groups of learners and use these opportunities to motivate all learners.
  • Use sanctions and rewards to reinforce expectations of all learners and provide clear boundaries to ensure a safe learning environment.
  • Support the academic progress and personal development of learners by using available data and evidence to inform tutoring and guidance.

Skills, Knowledge and Understanding of Staff

Staff have the knowledge, skills and understanding to be effective in providing a positive learning environment and effective support for learners, to enable them to take full advantage of the opportunities provided by their education.

  • Take responsibility for remaining fully informed about developments in pastoral care and in education that have an impact on the support of learners in school.
  • Have a clear knowledge and understanding of the requirements of safeguarding.
  • Are aware of the statutory and non – statutory requirements for pastoral support in areas such as attendance and careers.
  • Are aware of how tutoring and providing guidance supports learners.
  • Know how to develop learners key skills and promote spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development.
  • Know how to prepare learners for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.
  • Know how to support learners in developing the knowledge and understanding to keep themselves safe and look after their own well-being.
  • Are fully informed about current policies and developments in education that have an impact on the support of learners.
  • Ensure that all pastoral staff develop their skills and expertise through appropriate training and sharing of good practice.
  • Are aware of the data and evidence that can be used to inform the support of individual learners to enable them to achieve their full potential.

Phil Jones

National Chair of The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

November 2018

Inspired and developed from

“Standards for Pastoral Leaders. An exemplification of National Standards for Subject Leaders”, Chris Watkins, Kevin Buckle, Alan Dodds, NAPCE, 2000.

The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE), is an independent registered charity with no links to any government or other organisations. The aims of NAPCE are;

  • To support and inform those who have a professional concern for pastoral care;
  • To promote the theoretical study of pastoral care in education;
  • To disseminate good practice in pastoral care in education;
  • To promote the education, training and development of those engaged in pastoral care;
  • To liaise with other organisations who have similar objectives

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