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NAPCE News – May 2022

NAPCE News – May 2022

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  NAPCE Vice Chair Dr Matt Silver Explores the Value and Management of Energy During a Crisis

Energy During a Crisis

We are all seeking change, yet require the energy to action it. 

This pandemic has hit us in phases and as a result each phase has demanded a different energy from the whole education sector. Unlike typical change, the pandemic has seen the number of phases continue to mount, some expected overnight, some slowly burning our resources almost unconsciously.

Two years ago, it was very much crisis. I sat at my desk as a head teacher in denial.

Surely the news was exaggerated? Surely the talk of lockdown was the media gaining clicks? What was coming wasn’t going to truly close the country and our school down?

As the guidance came in (and then changed), it felt like a scene out of a movie. Concern swept across the face of every learner and teacher.

Doubt. Fear. Anxiety over whether they should be in school, protecting themselves or their loved ones. A war cabinet was drawn up and battle plans made to execute orders in order to navigate safety and survival for our community and global pandemic.

Tough decisions were made, and looking back now you can pick which ones saw an emotional overload take over the control panel.

A Downward Spiral 

We were in the survival stage. This demanded us to lead and try to remain stable in a context of stress, anxiety and panic.

Much like a sprinter it demanded adrenaline and produced much cortisol but instead of a short journey, this has become a marathon of sprints, almost normalised, and as a result burnout is evident.

For many, this has led to a negative cycle that still has many leaders running it in a state of fight, flight or freeze.

I coached a client last week who had refused to book in a session since December, simply because they were too concerned with their staff to take an hour for themselves and this is after the restrictions have lifted.

Such an imbalanced physiological and psychological state has kept our parasympathetic nervous system switched on constantly, meaning that with no recovery, a less active immune and digestive system, stress has become anxiety and anxiety is leading to depression and disconnection.

Without the awareness, literacy, or management to shift out of this state, professionals have resorted to different coping mechanisms.

Flight from the profession has clearly be seen with the great resignation, as has the freeze when it comes to the national shortage of those seeking to step into leadership and guide their communities for the storm (53% of deputy heads do not want to take the step).

In many conversations and reports, the top layer of education is crumbling and further exposing their communities to the same suffering when they need stability.

Wellbeing initiatives are not the solution as the majority are extrinsic and temporary glimmers of positivity.

To develop our capacity and wisdom to evolve with change must be intrinsic. It has to be the body and mind making the decision together and to choose to unite with others if rejection is going to be prevented.

The only consistent wellbeing that is present is our emotional state and this must remain positive to move forward.

Moving up the Spiral

To address this negative spiral of ourselves and our communities requires us to recognise that all we can control during a time of sensory overload, is our own physiological and psychological state.

This is not about chunks of time, but instead regenerating energy. Space to allow for an awareness of where our energy levels are and how we are using it for optimal recovery and then performance. The same to reconnect with those around us are and the climate surrounding us (in multiple forms).

Is the internal and external energy gain and spend where we want it to be? Is there balance? Only with awareness and a common language can we apply the tools to navigate our state.

Our schools are our boats. The captain has to know where they are going, how to pace the journey subject to conditions so it is sustainable for the crew, our engine.

I was fortunate enough to integrate self-management tools into my own practice and the school’s culture before the pandemic having been coached by a group called Complete, who focus on vertical development (upgrading the processor, not adding more apps). By no means did this mean plain sailing, but it did allow our team to seek balance in the eye of the storm, gain a greater capacity to adapt and therefore be there to guide others.

What we looked to provide was the awareness of our human bodies attention to homeostasis (balance).

The space to understand this allows us to take the first step to understanding why it is we are having such reactions to change, such outbursts that flare up in resistance or shutdowns and denial. Our bodies pH, oxygen levels, blood sugars (the list goes on) is so acute that the body goes to extremes to maintain it. The same can be said with the biological lab that is our body.

What we are seeking is to counter what lies behind most forms of coping; fear of losing balance. Why is this not more obvious? When we are in a negative state, our mind does not alert us to this in order to ensure we can run through pain barriers in order to survive.

When not using our pre-frontal lobes (our smart thinking) we still believe we are making rational decisions.

To address stress and anxiety build up, we can foster our DHEA production- the performance hormone and an antidote to cortisol.

Our coaching programme often starts with polyvagal exercises that inform our brains that all is OK and in a safe state to switch our parasympathetic nervous system on and allow rest and recovery mode. This allows us to move into positive emotional states and our pre-frontal lobe to switch on once more.

The key question to ask yourself is do you know when you are making erratic decisions and if you do, can you self-manage yourself out of this state? Do our learners not need the same? Imagine. We can no longer seek the conditions to do this as the conditions are in constant flux. We need to step back, enquire, gain awareness, and only then can we set a wiser course.

Whilst much has been rightly made of education reform, we must be able to consciously be in a balanced state if we are going to reduce the resistance and increase the quality and therefore coherence of the direction we are to take. So before reform, we feel you need to overcome the resistance and prepare for the journey. To begin this we require:

External and Inner Space

Often with coaching leaders or their teams, it is the simplicity of stepping out of their typical routines and providing them with a safe space to reconnect with their essence, examine their own personal and professional journey and resulting state from multiple angles held most value.

Having facilitated in various forms with hundreds of leaders over the pandemic, this is the most consistent pattern.

It is not that they need expertise or training of processes, but the space and map to look beneath their own surface and in doing so discovering their own state at multiple levels, their own purpose, and aligning these to function at peak performance.

The simplicity of such space and the common frameworks of adult development to guide the next steps have increased leaders’ capacity despite a global crisis.

When they experience the payback for themselves, they begin the same exploration within their teams, and it spreads to their learners. This allows them to maintain their captaincy, ship and align their course, ensuring others are still on board, have agency and remain for the journey despite the waves of constant flux we will continue to navigate.

As each lockdown receded and restrictions eased, we felt the need to rebalance and realign as we began to reconnect in physical form.

The appreciation for connection left us in a positive emotional state that allowed us to see hope again.

Whilst digital platforms provided an invaluable bridge, they serve only two senses.

Let us not forget how valuable those spaces to connect with each other and ourselves are.

Change is constant but so is growth.

To get you through to the end of term and start next year as a new chapter, Pathways Development is delivering a virtual masterclass on energy management. 

Click here to book your ticket: https://www.pathways-ed.org/pathways-development-events.

We cover the 5 E’s of Energy:

  1. Environment
  2. Emotion
  3. Eating and Exercise
  4. Essence
  5. Encompass

Dr Matt Silver is the CEO of Pathways Education and the Vice Chair of NAPCE. He is a system designer that implements deep learning and expansive development in a meaningful digital hybrid for leaders and learners alike whilst creating outstanding provisions. 

Pathways group of schools, colleges and leadership programmes live their mission by facilitating the individual and collective journey we are each on, driving learners to enhance their capacity, becoming self-determined and self-authoring so that they can dynamically connect with change. 

To create equitable communities, Pathways is building a flourishing co-operative that provides seed funding and incubation of social enterprises created by a network of the least served members in society, those with additional needs. This is supported by the profits generated by their international coaching and consultancy development offer. They created this during the pandemic.

GOOD PRACTICE: We Shine a Spotlight on the Great Work of the Finalists in “International Contribution” at NAPCE Awards 2021

Good Practice in Pastoral Care in Education

NAPCE is pleased to raise awareness about good practice in pastoral care in education highlighted by the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

This month it is the turn of last year’s finalists in the International Contribution to Pastoral Care category sponsored by the Hult International Business School.

This award is for an international school or organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

The winner in this category in 2021 was Bromsgrove International School, Thailand. 

Their nomination was for the creation and launch of the Bromsgrove Boarding Skills Awards scheme, which allows students a unique opportunity to reflect on their development and growth in boarding as well as obtaining micro-credentials.

The modules focused on characteristics required for later life and have a positive impact on academic work.

While the boarders do not have much time to ‘get bored’, equipping them with new skills to ensure they keep active helps with their mental health, an area increasingly prominent in pastoral care.

The scheme empowers students to better themselves and the community they live in, setting them on a path to become outstanding global citizens.

Other nominations in this category included Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern. 

Stephany’s work with inclusion at ISZL has had a powerful impact on many young people’s lives.

She works with students, staff, and the wider community to ensure the school stands behind its inclusion policy.

The nomination included the comment, “We Are All ISZL”, whatever their gender expression, identity, sexual orientation, race, or religion.

She has developed and nurtured the school’s Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion Network. Her work with students and staff has given an opportunity for people who may feel reluctant to share their voice a safe place to be heard and the chance to drive change forward.

Another example of good practice in this category was the nomination for Child1st Consultancy Limitedfor the work of Ann Marie Christian.

Ann Marie has delivered training and consultancy to international schools since 2008. She was headhunted and recommended to a CEO of a school in Dubai and continues to deliver this work.

She has spoken at International Conferences in the Middle East, the Caribbean, and the Far East. She writes articles and raises the awareness of the importance of well-being and educating people internationally about child abuse and how to report it and spot the signs.

In 2019 Ann Marie was recognised and won the Wintrade International Award for Women in the Public Sector. She is an associate consultant for COIS and BSME.
 
The closing date for nominations for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE is on 30th May, 2022, so now is the time to spend a few minutes making a nomination to recognise the good practice and hard work of people working in pastoral care in education to make a difference in the education of children and young people.

ENTER NOW: https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

Nominations are free and a grand presentation event is planned for October to announce the winners in each category.

More information can be found at https://www.napce.org.uk/napce-awards-2022-entry-now-open/                                                                                         

 

WELCOME: Meet New NAPCE NEC Member Luke Ramsden

Welcome to Luke Ramsden

We are very pleased to welcome Luke Ramsden as a member of the NAPCE National Executive Committee.

Luke is Senior Deputy Headteacher and senior Safeguarding Lead at St Benedict’s School in Ealing in London Luke was the winner of the Pastoral Leader of the Year Awardsponsored by Taylor and Francis, in the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE.

This award is for a leader who has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

His nomination for the award explained how Luke had been responsible for developing outstanding safeguarding and pastoral practice at St Benedict’s School and how he has introduced a range of initiatives that have promoted the safety and wellbeing of pupils.

This has included successful campaigns to tackle bullying, peer-on-peer abuse and mental health issues where Luke has made use of accurate data to identify, predict and effectively target problems.

Luke is also the Chair of a Safeguarding Advisory Panel that provides expert advice and is regularly invited to speak at safeguarding events and conferences.

His contribution to the development of effective safeguarding and pastoral practice has been truly outstanding.

Luke started his teaching career at Tonbridge School where he was Head of History and was then a Housemaster at Ampleforth College before moving to Ealing.

In his role as Senior Deputy Head he is responsible for the day-to-day running of the school, as well as the pastoral oversight of all the students and overseeing the school’s PSHE programme (among a number of other roles).

In his time at St Benedict’s the school has become a flagship school for safeguarding and pastoral care, with the happiness of every student placed firmly at the heart of all the school does.

Luke regularly talks at educational conferences, and writes on safeguarding, pastoral care, and in particular the use of data to inform excellence in both these areas.

Among other positions Luke holds outside St Benedict’s is as Trustee of the School’s Consent Project charity.

We are delighted that Luke has become a member of the National Executive Committee and he has already started contributing to the work of the Association and will be speaking at the June online conference and at the National Safeguarding Conference in London in September on behalf of NAPCE.

If you might be interested in contributing to the work of NAPCE as a member of the National Executive Committee then you first need to become a member of the Association.

Please contact admin@napce.org.uk to let us know that you are interested in contributing to the work of the Association and for further details.

It would be great to hear form you if you are interested in pastoral care in education and are passionate about supporting children and young people to achieve their full potential from their education.                                                                                            

 

CONFERENCE: FREE Tickets Available Now for NAPCE Online Spring Conference 2022

Online Spring Conference 2022

‘How can effective pastoral care support learners and prepare them for their future roles in society’? 

After months of planning for the NAPCE Online Conference 2022 we now have less than one month to wait for the event.

If you haven’t secured your place already, now is the time to book your ticket, so you do not miss out on the brilliant line up of speakers who are covering important issues for everybody interested in pastoral care or working in a pastoral role in education.

You can join one of the biggest events on the pastoral calendar with the ‘Pastoral Question Time’ on the Thursday evening of the Conference.

Pour yourself a glass of wine or cup of tea, send in your questions (to admin@napce.org.uk ) and listen to the views of our expert panel from around the world.

Join other people interested in pastoral care in education live on the evening by registering on Eventbrite for your ticket.

The links for the events will be sent out to ticket holders in the next few weeks.

BOOK FREE TICKETS HERE:
https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME
Wednesday 15 June
2-00pm Welcome to the Conference – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE
2-10pm Presentation 1– The School Response to Online Sexual Harassment and Abuse., Professor Kaitlyn Mendes, University of western Ontario Canada.
2-40pm Questions
2-45pm Presentation 2 – Developing Effective Supervision for Safeguarding, Carl Elder, Educational Consultant
3-15pm Questions
3-20pm Presentation 3 – The Rock and Roll Years for Education and the Lessons for Pastoral Care, Les Walton, CBE, Educationalist and Author
3-50pm Questions
3-55pm Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Thursday 16th June
7-00pm to 8-00pm NAPCE QUESTION TIME – How can pastoral care and support in schools enable young people to achieve their full potential? 
Chaired by Phil Jones – Chair of NAPCE
Invited onto panel,
Dr Noel Purdy– Deputy Editor of Pastoral Care in Education.
Maria O’Neil – Author ‘Proactive Pastoral Care
Dr Mark Diacoupolos, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Leadership, Pittsburg State University. USA
Charlie Walker, Student member of NAPCE National Executive.
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London.
Dr Helen O’Connor, St Swithins’ School Psychologist.

Friday 17th June 
10-00am Welcome – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE
10-10am Presentation 4 – Using data to Create a Proactive Pastoral Strategy, Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
10-40 Questions
10-45am Presentation 5 – Lessons from Pastoral Care in a Special School, Nadine Huseyin, Family Support, Pastoral and Safeguarding lead, the Grove School Tottenham
11-15am Questions
11-20am Presentation 6 –The future Challenges of Managing Behaviour, Phil Jones, National Chair, The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education
11-50 am Questions
11-55am Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Speakers and guests on the Question Time panel include:

Dr Helen O’Connor – Following a Clinical Doctorate from Royal Holloway University in 2001 Helen developed a specialist interest in OCD and eating disorders and worked for 14years within CAMHS and in her last position before leaving the NHS as the Lead Consultant Psychologist for a Psychological Therapies team within an adolescent inpatient unit. Helen left the NHS to work at St Swithun’s in 2015 as the schools Psychologist. Whilst working primarily with girls both preventing and managing mental health problems, Helen has developed an interest in helping teachers and education leaders consider ways of improving wellbeing for pupils in the classroom. Helen has introduced a positive education curriculum and this has now been nominated for a TES award for Pastoral Initiative of the Year 2022.

Dr Kaitlyn Mendes – Kaitlynn Mendes, PhD, is Associate Professor of Sociology and Canada Research Chair in Inequality and Gender at the University of Western Ontario, Canada and Honorary Professor of Gender, Media, and Sociology at the University of Leicester, UK. She has written widely about young people’s experiences of sexual violence, and the creative ways they have used digital technologies to challenge it. She is author of numerous books and articles including: Digital Feminist Activism: Girls and Women Fight Back Against Rape Culture (2019) and is currently co-writing a book called: Life After Lockdown: Young People, Schools, and Recovering from the Pandemic.

My presentation will focus on the crisis in schools around sexual violence, stemming from the Instagram site and website Everyone’s Invited, and the ways schools and teachers have struggled to respond. The talk is based on research conducted between March 2021-March 2022 with nearly 1000 young people and 77 teachers in England.

Dr Noel Purdy

MA (Cantab), MA (Ed.), MEd, PhD, PGCE, PGCCET, SFHEA, FLF, FCMI, CMgr
Director of Research and Scholarship, Head of Education Studies
Stranmillis University College, Belfast

Dr Noel Purdy is Director of Research and Scholarship and Head of Education Studies at Stranmillis University College, where he is also Director of CREU (the Centre for Research in Educational Underachievement).  He lectures at undergraduate and postgraduate level and has a particular research interest in educational underachievement, special educational needs and tackling bullying in schools.  He studied Modern and Medieval Languages at Cambridge University before teaching French and German in two post-primary schools (one all-ability, one grammar) in Northern Ireland. He has also taught in Germany and Switzerland.  He was the northern co-chair of the all-Ireland Standing Conference on Teacher Education North and South (SCoTENS) 2016-2021 and remains on their steering committee.  He is a member and former chair of the Northern Ireland Anti-Bullying Forum (NIABF 2013-2016) and was President of NASEN in Northern Ireland (2014-2016).  Recent research projects include a two-year Erasmus+ project working with 4 other EU partners to address cyberbullying in schools, a study of parental experiences of the SEN system in Northern Ireland funded by NICCY, two surveys of parental experiences of lockdown home-schooling in Northern Ireland in 2020 and 2021, a report on loyalist and republican former prisoners’ attitudes to educational underachievement, and (currently) a study of perceptions of level 4 and 5 vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland funded by the Department for the Economy. He is Editor (Acting) of Pastoral Care in Education – An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development. He chaired the Expert Panel on Educational Underachievement in Northern Ireland 2020-2021 whose final report and action plan A Fair Start was launched on 1 June 2021.  Most recently in February 2022 he was appointed Chair of the Steering Committee to review the 2013 Action Plan on Bullying in Ireland, appointed by Education Minister Norma Foley TD.

For more information about the presenters and guests 
on the Question Time Panel please follow us on Twitter @NAPCE1 or visit the ticket link here
https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

CELEBRATION DINNER: Join us to Celebrate NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary

You are invited to the Anniversary dinner to celebrate the 40 years since NAPCE was formed.

It will be an opportunity to meet with other people who have contributed to the history of NAPCE and to celebrate the difference it has made for raising awareness about pastoral care in education and the difference it makes to the learning experience for children and young people and supports their personal development to prepare them for their future lives in society.

This event will take place at the Worcestershire Cricket Ground, overlooking the Severn River and cathedral in Worcester.

It takes place on Saturday 8th October as part of a weekend of events to celebrate the anniversary which include a two-day conference and the presentation for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022.

The event is open to members and non-members.

Availability is limited and you are advised to reserve your ticket early to avoid disappointment.

Tickets can be reserved by visiting https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/napce-40th-anniversary-dinner-tickets-299335118397

The programme for the evening is,

7-00pm Guests Arrive – Prosecco Welcome Reception.
7-30pm Three Course Anniversary Dinner.

Dinner menu

  1. Starter                       
  2. Cream of Leek, Potato and Watercress Soup, Croutons (V) (GF)
  3. Main course             
  4. Roasted Chicken Supreme, Gratin Potato, and Red Wine Gravy (GF
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Vegetarian/Vegan Gluten Free option 

  1. Starter
  2. Leek, Sweet Potato and Spinach Soup (GF)
  3. Main course
  4. Butternut Squash, Sweet Potato and Roasted Red Peppers, Parsley and Dill Sauce with Tender Stem Broccoli (GF)
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Please advise in advance of the evening if you would prefer the vegetarian option or if you have any additional dietary requirements.

8-30pm After Dinner Speaker – Les Walton CBE

Les as he explains in his recently published book ’Education the Rock and Roll Years. A Northern Perspective on A lifetime of learning Teaching and Leading’, was one of the leading educationalists involved in the forming of NAPCE in 1982.

As the title of the book suggests, Les has a wide experience of education in recent history that he will share with guests at the dinner.

9-30 pm Pay bar available until 11-00 pm to meet old friends and make new friends. Please note this is a cashless venue.

The cost of the Anniversary Dinner is £35.00 for full members of NAPCE, £40.00 for Associate members and £45.00 for non- members.

Please dress to impress.

Please note that tickets will not be refunded unless the event is cancelled by the Association for reasons beyond its control when a full refund will be made.

There are direct train services from London to Worcester Foregate Station which is a ten-minute walk or short taxi ride from the venue.

Cross country trains call at the new Worcestershire Parkway, which has connections to Foregate Street. There is parking available at the venue and at public car parks nearby.

The venue has a Premier Inn Hotel on the site and there is a good choice of other options for accommodation in the city of Worcester.

Please book your tickets early to ensure that you do not miss this important event in NAPCE’s history to celebrate the contribution it has made to education in the last 40 years.

If you have any questions about the event, please contact NAPCE administration at admin@napce.co.uk

 

40th ANNIVERSARY: Weekend Conference Details Released to Mark Four Decades of NAPCE

We are very proud to reveal details of the weekend conference to mark NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary in October.

Further details are being added in the coming weeks.

Dates for the Diary

The 40th Anniversary Conference and Events Weekend – October 2022

Venue
Worcestershire County Cricket Club
County Ground
New Road
Worcester
WR2 4QQ

Friday 7th October

Conference Day One

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Research and Policy making.

Confirmed Speakers

Dr Noel Purdy – Director of Research and Scholarship at Stranmillis University College, Belfast, and Deputy Editor of ‘Pastoral Care in Education’
Maria O Neil – Educationalist and author of ‘Proactive Pastoral Care’
Professor Helen Cowie – University of Surrey

Invited and waiting for confirmation 

The Rt Hon Nadim Zahawi, Secretary of State for Education
Ofsted
Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Saturday 8th October 

Conference Day Two

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Good Practice.
Daniel Sobel – Educationalist, author and founder and CEO of Inclusion Expert
Ron Skelton – Headteacher and CEO of Broadway School, Perry Barr, Birmingham
Dr Helen O Connor – Psychologist at St Swithun’s School in Winchester
Invited and to be confirmed
Mrs Heather Hansbury, President, Girls School Association

Workshops include:

Jill Robson – NAPCE National Secretary – Effective PSHE

Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Tickets: https://napce2022.eventbrite.co.uk/

Reduced price tickets will be available for NAPCE members, and a reduced-price ticket will be available for both days of the conference.

Other Events planned for the Anniversary weekend in Worcester include 

Friday 7th October 7-00pm
Presentation Event for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 Closes on May 30th

There are just a few days left to enter the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards takes place in our 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – February 2022

NAPCE News – February 2022

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: “A Kestrel for a Knave” – NAPCE’s Dr Noel Purdy Reflects on the How Relevant This Popular Novel Could Be Today in Pastoral Care

A Kestrel for a Knave – Reflections on Pastoral Care by Dr Noel Purdy

Recently I have been re-reading Barry Hines’ 1968 novel Kestrel for a Knave, the story of Billy Casper, a young working-class boy who finds and trains a kestrel (Kes).

Adapted into a film Kes directed by Ken Loach the following year, both the novel and the film have developed an international fan base that extends far beyond Barnsley and Yorkshire, with the novel studied by thousands of pupils every year on the GCSE English literature specification, and clips from the film now appearing regularly on social media channels.

The enduring appeal of the story can be seen in a heart-warming 2019 BBC documentary by comedian (and former teacher) Greg Davies and by the recent unveiling of a statue of ‘Billy’ in Barnsley by Dai Bradley (who played him in the 1968 film) in memory of Barry Hines.

The story itself is dark, gritty, unforgiving in its portrayal of a troubled family in a working-class mining community where prospects are limited, aspirations low and discipline harsh by today’s standards.

The portrayal of school is overwhelmingly negative.

We see a regime controlled by corporal punishment, imposed without conscience by the merciless headmaster Mr Gryce (an innocent messenger boy is caned and is physically sick as a result); where teachers are portrayed as largely humourless (after calling out the name ‘Fisher’ as part of the class roll call, Mr Crossley fails to appreciate Billy shouting out ‘German Bight’ which caused him to make a mistake on the roll book); and where physical and verbal bullying are rife, meted out by both pupils and teachers.

Billy is bullied by his older brother Jud as well as other boys in school and there is little that Billy’s mother or teachers at school are able or willing to do to stop it.

In a flashback near the end of the novel, we learn that Billy’s father had left home, having discovered his wife having an affair with ‘Uncle Mick’, meaning that Billy is also teased by other boys for coming from a single parent household and for his mother subsequently having other partners.

Even the humour of the famous football match scene where Mr Sugden, resplendent in his Denis Law Manchester United strip, plays and cheats his way to victory, is tinged with cruelty as Billy is humiliated by being forced to wear oversized shorts that pull up to his neck, and is then forced into freezing cold showers by Sugden who positions other boys to block his escape.

And of course, the story concludes with Jud killing Kes, Billy’s pride and joy, as a thoughtless act of revenge for Billy failing to place a winning bet.

The book is a tough, disturbing read.  I have been reading the story with my 12 year old son whose standard responses have alternated between “Did that really happen in those days?” and “That’s a terrible Yorkshire accent, dad!”

And yet, I couldn’t help but search for some glimmers of hope in an otherwise joyless working-class world.

Aside from the new passion for life that Billy discovers through training the kestrel hawk, the only other glimmer of light I have found is in the character of Mr Farthing, the only teacher who seems to take any genuine pastoral interest in Billy, who gives him the opportunity to speak in front of his peers about training his hawk, and who goes to watch Billy fly Kes one lunchtime.

What we see here is the essence of pastoral care through the importance of relationship, the giving of opportunity to develop, and the resulting sense of pride and mutual respect that emerge.

When Billy speaks in front of his classmates, he captivates them with his knowledge and passion, and he is able to spell out specific vocabulary without fault (jesses, swivel, leash) that he has learned from devouring the book on falconry he stole from the local bookshop.

For me at least, this is my favourite scene of the whole novel and talks to themes of pupil engagement, curricular relevance and opportunities to flourish.

So what can we learn of any relevance to today from a 1960s novel set in a small Yorkshire mining community?

As Dai Bradley said at the unveiling of the statue of Billy and Kes in Barnsley in November 2021, this short novel about a boy and his kestrel is known right across the world, and, importantly, “a lot of young people look towards Billy for support when they’re having problems in their early life through bullying or problems at school”.

Some of our NAPCE members will know much more than me about gritty Yorkshire mining towns, and perhaps more about falconry too, but perhaps I could encourage you to re-read and rediscover the pastoral importance of a much-loved story.

If this has sparked an interest, feel free to get in touch.

Dr Noel Purdy
Stranmillis University College, Belfast
Deputy Editor, Pastoral Care in Education

n.purdy@stran.ac.uk

ARTICLE: Virtually Nothing is Impossible: Pastoral Approaches to Online Safety by NAPCE Member Dominic Riste

Virtually nothing is impossible: Pastoral Approaches to Online Safety by Dominic Riste

Caring for the personal development of young people is both a fundamentally worthy and complicated endeavour.

Worthy because it takes a responsibility for social, emotional and personal growth, complicated because it encompasses a wide range of variables that shape an individual’s growth such as beliefs, core values, home life, motivation and experiences.

As a result, pastoral care must be adaptable, embedded robustly (across a school or institution) and constantly evolving.

One of the most significant developments and source of continuous advancements that are transmitted into the lives of young people are the influences and risks inherent in their online activities.

As an influential source of knowledge and communication it exerts significant influence over how young people perceive themselves and their own personal development.

In the UK, the recent updates to the regulation of the online world, implemented to strengthen the Online Safety Bill, are portrayed as a preventative approach to tackling harmful behaviours.

The new measures are accredited with making it easier, more efficient and quicker to identify offenders as well as holding social media companies to account and increasing their responsibility to deter and prevent misuse while protecting their users more effectively.

In essence they mirror the proactive approach that effective pastoral care takes to educate and protect young people about online safety.

Supporting young people to navigate the intricately spun (and sometimes adhesively addictive) content of the world wide web has proactivity at its heart.

A degree of openness is required with all stakeholders.

The sharing of information with parents, children and teachers is fundamental, highlighting both the positive and potentially negative facets of apps, websites and social media platforms.

Often the hazards that exist online – disingenuous profiles, cyberbullying and invasion of privacy thrive – thrive when unacknowledged and covert.

The need for openness extends into having a supportive approach where young people feel that issues they experience online are listened to and taken seriously and met with understanding and support.

It is this need that asks all stakeholders to grapple with the question: How can we protect our young people online without simply limiting access or independence?

If we are to trust and encourage this openness in young people when they are online, then pastoral care must compliment this with education and empowerment.

The skills that are promoted, nurtured and developed in young people are vital in empowering them to navigate the risks of the internet.

Encouraging transferable skills, such as the ability to think critically, are now an even more important aspect of personal development.

If we are to accept that the online world commands a role in influencing a young person’s values, sense of self, confidence, views and potentially their identity, the capability of determining the accuracy, reliability and bias of information becomes a personal safety defense.

Given the private and personal nature of phone and internet, young people need to be able to exercise the often difficult skill of critical thinking independently.

Across the curriculum and interactions with young people we can encourage them to think independently and value the critical skills necessary to use the internet for its considerable potential and advantages.

Planning across subjects can consider questions such as, how can I develop critical thinkers around my subject area?

From the perspective of teaching English, how can recognising perspective and viewpoint be embedded more explicitly as a learning objective?

In History, how can the influence of bias be explored?

How can young people explore the reliability and trustworthiness of sources?

How can we engage with contextual and current affairs in a way that highlights the need for criticality and awareness when looking at the influence of perspective?

Ultimately, this implies the need for a holistic and embedded approach that does not resemble a tack on, tick box or isolated initiative.

Contextually, the use of technology and the internet is not a separate and additional component to the lives of young people, it is entrenched in the fabric of their lives, therefore the pastoral care that advises and educates young people about online opportunities, risks and realities must be similarly embedded when considering their personal development.

Felicitously (for this article) February sees the celebration of Internet Safety Day, which promotes the safe use of digital technology with an emphasis on the considerable power of using the internet positively.

The occasion marks an opportunity to encourage a national conversation around the critical, creative and courteous use of technology, yet it must also be at the forefront of regular pastoral work.

Equipping young people is a year-round as well as a worthy and complicated endeavour.

Dominic Riste
NEC Member, NAPCE

ARTICLE: Using Data to Create Effective Strategies in Schools by NAPCE Award Winner Luke Ramsden

Using Data to Create Effective Strategies in Schools by Luke Ramsden

Introduction
 
All schools have understood the benefits of using data to track the academic progress of their students (and the performance of their different departments) for many years now.

Detailed evaluation of performance is now a standard part of every school’s strategy for ensuring the best possible results.

In doing this schools are paralleling companies and many other organisations in realising the importance of using data to inform their strategies.

There are two potential problems, though, that need to be understood to ensure that data can be used really effectively in the planning of a whole-school strategy.

The first of these is that, understandably enough, many school leaders and governors have not had much training in data analysis and so do not always find themselves that comfortable in evaluating the growing quantities of data being thrown at them.

For instance, school leaders can sometimes make decisions on data without fully understanding the concept of Statistical Significance.

To give a common example, many schools will use the number of students getting an Oxbridge offer as a benchmark of academic success.

However, with a few exceptions, the numbers applying are so small each year that they do not make a statistically significant sample.

In comparison those getting offers to Russell Group universities which is probably a much larger sample is a far better measure as it does not depend much on the fortunes of each individual student.

The second problem is that, while senior teams have a clear focus on academic data to create a forward-thinking and clearly planned strategy, data in other areas of school life often remains relatively neglected.

This is despite the fact that the introduction of software to record and categorise behavioural and pastoral issues are increasingly used, giving schools at least as much data to analyse here as in the academic sphere.

Using data on attendance

Attendance is a good example of an area of school life where seemingly simple data records of attendance need to be evaluated and contextualised with care.

All schools already closely monitor student attendance through their registers.

Indeed, a document published in January by the Department for Education, New measures to increase school attendance means that ‘Schools are … being asked from today to sign up to a new daily attendance data collection trial. Data  will be gathered  directly from school registers, reducing administrative work and potentially helping schools, academy trusts, local authorities and central Government spot and address system-wide issues more quickly.’

Yet, while collecting raw attendance data is clearly important to monitor and challenge low attendance, a number of recent news stories have highlighted the issue of schools punishing poor attendance even when there might be a very good pastoral or medical explanation for absence.

It seems common sense that, in order to understand attendance data fully, schools should incorporate contextual information to understand why attendance might be low.

For instance, students with low attendance due to anxiety or other mental health concerns could be given a separate category of attendance to contextualise and explain this low attendance.

The same could be done for students with documented physical health concerns that have also led to low attendance.

In that way schools can ensure they are challenging poor attendance while also being mindful of students’ pastoral concerns.

Similarly, if attendance data is contextualised like this schools can ensure that they can plan a really effective strategy to improve attendance levels.

So, for instance, if a large number of absentee students have documented mental health concerns then school investment in mental health support such as school counselling will be more effective than fines on parents in improving attendance.

Behaviour tracking

In the same way as schools already have a lot of raw data on attendance, schools will also generally have a lot of data on behaviour through the noting of detentions, suspensions and exclusions.

Again, though, the important thing is to be able to process and evaluate this data so that it becomes useful information for school leaders and governors.

A good example of this is in interpreting an increase in the number of detentions in a school.

A simplistic reading of the data that the number of detentions rose in a term or a year could just be to assume that it means that behaviour has grown worse in the school as more students must be misbehaving.

Yet it could also be that the behaviour policy has changed in an attempt to improve behaviour and so it is easier to get a detention, and also perhaps that teachers have been asked to be more vigilant for poor behaviour and so it is being more widely reported.

The dilemma this gives schools can be seen in the wake of last year’s Ofsted Review of Sexual Abuse in Schools and Colleges.

All teachers will be much more vigilant in looking out for these cases, and also in recording them as this is now a requirement for inspection.

This will lead to an increase in peer on peer abuse cases recorded by many schools, but whilst superficial reading of this data by school governors or inspectors might seem to indicate a school with growing problems in this area in fact it shows that the school is doing absolutely the right thing with an increasing number of cases recorded.

In terms of developing wider school strategies the real opportunity that comes from behavioural data comes from using the broader pattern of behaviour events to evaluate what school policies have had a positive impact and what strategies are likely to work in the future.

So, for instance, if bullying cases are recorded it might be that over the years a clear pattern can be seen that bullying cases peak at a particular time of year.

This can allow the school to act pre-emptively the next year by ensuring that there are anti-bullying assemblies at that time of year, that there are extra teachers on duty to monitor behaviour and so on.

The more data that is being collected the more targeted this can be, so for instance if you collect data on where incidents happen, you can look to target particular ‘hot spots’ for poor behaviour where teachers are on duty or even work to develop the site, perhaps opening up or just redecorating a forgotten corner of the campus where students felt unobserved.

Pastoral tracking

Schools have not historically made a habit of collecting purely pastoral concerns in the form of data that can be processed and evaluated.

However, the ubiquity of MyConcern, CPOMS and other online pastoral systems mean that schools now have a tremendous new opportunity here as well to be just as well-informed here as in all other areas of school life.

As with academic and behaviour tracking the most significant element of this is that it allows senior leaders to develop a school strategy of pastoral care that can pre-empt issues in the future rather than just reacting to events as they occur.

So if a school saw a particular spike in anxiety cases in their year 9 students then the PSHE programme for the next year could be tailored to have a greater number of lessons looking at mental health first aid, and tutors for the next academic year could have specific training to help them support that year group.

Again, like behaviour management, the more detailed the data is the better use the school can make of it, so ensuring that pastoral data is clearly categorised is crucial.

So if it was clear that anxiety concerns in year 9 were largely about academic achievement or largely post-covid anxiety about attendance this would allow even more specific support to be put in place for the students to support those issues.

Over the years broader long-term trends can also be seen, and quantified, far more clearly when keeping pastoral records online and the broader strategic needs of the school identified.

So in a school where it is felt that there might be a need for great counselling provision the senior team can quickly and easily identify the numbers of cases each year which would have benefitted from this and see exactly how much that need has grown over the preceding years.

It is clear then that there are huge opportunities for schools to take advantage of the vast amounts of data being collected by the electronic systems that they use, but that all of this data needs to be evaluated and used intelligently so that it moves from being raw data to useful information.

Luke Ramsden
Senior Deputy Head
St Benedict’s School, London

ARTICLE: Using Data Insights to Positively Impact Pastoral Care by Alex Kyriacou of UOK

Using Data Insights To Positively Impact Pastoral Care

You could be forgiven for seeing the word data in the title of this article and swiftly scrolling on.

But the reality is that our lives today are dominated by it, so we should be asking how we can harness it to positively impact pastoral care?

No amount of technology, AI or software will replace human interaction and meaningful conversations when it comes to addressing wellbeing issues.

But if used correctly and in a way that is tailored to the environment, data insights can be a valuable tool to aid interventions, early or ongoing.

It is important that we make a distinction between two types of data, Big Data and Small Data.

Big Data, as the name suggests is high volume, super detailed and is often characterised as “massive chunks of unstructured information”.

Small Data connects people with timely, meaningful insights, neatly presented to be accessible, understandable, and most importantly actionable.

For the purpose of this article, our focus is very much on small data.

In the education sector where time and resources are precious, producing a never-ending stack of data and asking staff to wade through it and find actionable solutions would be completely impractical.

You would be laughed out of the staffroom for even suggesting it.

Collecting detailed reports on wellbeing trends within student cohorts has its place but if it takes 3 months to collect and analyse the data to get these insights, is it worth it?

On one side of the coin, absolutely.

However, on the other, it leaves the window open for potential concerns to manifest and/or escalate.

Concerns that may have otherwise been picked up on if a different approach had been adopted.

In contrast the ability to review small chunks of insight into a student’s state of wellbeing and mental health throughout the academic year is an intriguing one, for obvious reasons.

How well are they sleeping? Are they feel supported by friends and family? Do they feel prepared for the week ahead?

These concise insights could help start more meaningful conversations, making an immediate impact where needed.

Whilst simultaneously promoting a student’s self-awareness, something that is unlikely to happen following a laborious 100 question survey.

But if small data insights are this brilliant and can aid early intervention so well, then why isn’t every school harnessing them?

The simple answer is that the means to do so in a way that is specifically tailored to the school environment, without impacting staff workload, hasn’t been readily available…until recently.

UOK Wellbeing
UOK Wellbeing is a start-up based out of Hertfordshire that has built a platform with the sole purpose of providing a way to capture these small data insights from students and present them to front line pastoral staff in a way that is easily actionable whilst being time and cost effective.

So how does it work?

In under 30 seconds students complete an engaging wellness check-in via the UOK app, where they provide a subjective rating to various pillars of wellbeing; Engagement, Motivation, Sleep, Positive Emotions etc.

The staff platform then has the capability to alert designated individuals (such as form tutors) when a potential concern is identified. As well as providing an clear visual overview of the ongoing wellbeing state of individuals.

If you are interested in providing such a tool for your pastoral staff, and would like a free trial of the platform, you can contact the UOK team via contact@uokwellbeing.co.uk or find out more info on their website www.uokwellbeing.co.uk

Alex Kyriacou
Director
UOK Wellbeing

MEMBERSHIP: Renewals for NAPCE 2022 Membership Are Being Sent Out

2022 Membership Renewals – NAPCE

Invitations are being sent out to NAPCE members to renew your membership for 2022.

This year is the 40th anniversary of the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education.

Special events including a weekend conference and Anniversary Dinner are planned to celebrate the 40 years that NAPCE has been supporting education.

Members will have priority for bookings so to make sure that you are fully involved in the Association’s special year renew your membership early and get the full benefits of being a member of NAPCE.

If you have shown your interest in the work of NAPCE by registering for the newsletter or following NAPCE on social media, then now is the time to become a member in time for the anniversary year. 

The National Executive have made the decision to NOT INCREASE THE PRICE OF MEMBERSHIP for 2022 and full membership includes a subscription for four copies of the academic journal to be delivered to your home address.

Taylor and Francis publishers manage the membership subscriptions on behalf of NAPCE and their contact details are T&F Customer Services, Sheepen Place, Colchester, CO3 3LP, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7017 5543 . Fax: +44 (0) 20 7017 5198 . Email: societies@tandf.co.uk. Contact Taylor and Francis to find out about the different ways that you can pay your subscription.

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP –  Individual and Group memberships include a subscription to Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PCE) Published by Routledge

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP including one copy of PCE Individual Subscription Rate £44 US$88 €57 NQT/Retired/Student Individual Rate £21 US$40 €33

GROUP MEMBERSHIP including two copies of PCE Group Subscription rate £66 US$132 €86 Primary/Special School Rate £43

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP society membership only – does not include PCE subscription. Associate Subscription rate £10 US$16 €30

Follow this link to apply for membership RPED_NAPCEmembership-New.pdf (netdna-ssl.com) or go to Apply Online – NAPCE to apply for membership online.

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 is Now Open

Nominations are currently open for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards takes place in our 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – October 2021

NAPCE News – October 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  NAPCE NEC Member & Pastoral Care Leader Connor Acton Explores the Importance of Parent/Carer Communication

Parent/carer communication is easy to get right, painful when you get it wrong and downright disastrous if it goes really wrong.

It’s sometimes easy to forget that when we speak to parents, or communicate via other means, that the person on the other end of the line is also a living, breathing human with their own worries and concerns as well as their own day job or personal life to manage.

It’s also easy to forget how you desire to be spoken to when you are ringing a parent, late on a Friday, after a long day at work.

You want to get your point across, tell the parent what their child has done wrong, alongside any sanction, and get out of there as quickly as possible.

Unfortunately, in doing so, you set yourself up to fail and the building blocks for a poor parental relationship begin to stack on top of each other.

You’ll soon realise that once the blocks have started to stack, each conversation you have results in them stacking faster, to the point you dread ringing them at all because you know how the conversation will go.

In reality there really aren’t many occasions where a parental phone call should be challenging – a difficult conversation may need to be had but that doesn’t mean that it needs to be one which results in either party leaving it and feeling like they’ve done twelve rounds with Mike Tyson.

As a Pastoral Leader I can’t begin to think of how many phone calls I’ve made during my career, more than some call centres I’m sure, and I certainly can’t begin to imagine all of the many reasons for doing so.

That being said there have been some incredibly difficult conversations to be had; there have been times I have had to recommend we end a conversation and pick it up later; times when the 5-minute phone call becomes 30mins-1hr of trying to resolve a multitude of issues; times when I’ve hung up and had to call social services or the police.

You never know where a phone call home, or a chat on the gate, or any other method of communication might take you.

You should know, however, that there are some really simple things you can do to make sure that parental communication/relationships needn’t be painful.

Parental communication, and by extension co-operation, is one of the biggest keys to your success as a mentor, TA, Teacher, Pastoral Leader etc.

Most parents will want to work with you to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be – almost all parents will want to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be but may not want to work with you!

Courtesy and respect go a long way in building strong working relationships with parents – the vast majority of your communications with parents will likely be by phone.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve sat with a member of staff who starts a phone call to a parent with “Hello, it’s Mr X from school, John was a nightmare in his DT lesson today”.

Those kinds of opening messages get most parent’s backs up straight away. Introduce yourself, start by asking them if they are alright, if they have a couple of minutes to talk and you’ll often find they are much more willing to engage with you.

That’s not always the case but if you’ve taken the time to be respectful at the start of the conversation you will have at least set the table for a polite conversation.

Think about how you feel when the insurance salesman rings at 4pm, after a long day, and asks you if you’ve got some time to talk – I’m certainly not comparing us to cold callers but for some parents the feeling is the same!

Try and ensure that your first communication with a parent isn’t a negative one wherever possible – when we take over a class/group, or first start working with a child, we generally know where we might expect problems.

Get early conversations in with their parents by spotting praise where possible within the first few interactions you have with their child – this will make it easier for you to call later on if you need to ring for less positive reasons.

There are a huge number of parents who dread seeing the school number on their phone – how many times have you had a parent/carer answer with “What’s she done now?”.

For some of our communities the thought of a telling off from school brings back negative memories of their own and this is always something to be cognizant of.

Even if you can’t see any opportunities for praise you can still call and introduce yourself in situations where you feel it may be beneficial – if you take over a class, for example, that you know have been historically poorly behaved there’s no harm in ringing some parents of key students to introduce yourself, acknowledge the issues from the past and then let them know you are going to be working to move things forward.

You may even find that a parent/carer has suggestions/advice to offer that could be valuable for you, having never worked with their child before.

Praise phone calls, postcards, emails etc. will always be a great way to endear yourself to most parents/carers and you should endeavour to do this as much as you reasonably can.

I’ve always been a fan of the ‘Friday Five’ approach – making five positive phonecalls on a Friday – to end the week on a high and make five children’s (and their parent’s) weekends.

Keep any reporting of behaviour as factual and clear as possible and, if you need to, think beforehand about the message you wish to convey.

It can be hard for a parent to hear a statement like “Harry was incredibly rude, and his language was disgusting in the lesson” – you are much better off keeping it to what actually happened “Harry came into the classroom today and when I asked him to take off his coat, he told me to shut up” is harder hitting, much more accurate and also makes it sound less like it’s your opinion.

When you report any sanctions you gave you may also want to link it clearly to the school’s behaviour policy – “I had no choice but to have him removed in line with the school’s behaviour policy and he then lost his breaktime as a result” – this takes away some of the feeling that you are directly responsible for the sanction, and thus the person to direct any negative energy towards.

If the time is right you can then start to talk about how to move forward, what your expectations for the student are and what the next lesson or interaction with them might look like.

That is the ultimate goal – how can you improve the situation moving forward.

Always try to be aware of the time of day and the time your conversation may take – if you know you need to have a long chat with a parent don’t just call and expect them to drop everything for you – there’s nothing wrong with letting them know this could be a longer conversation and asking if there’s a more convenient time for them.

Equally, in reverse, you aren’t obligated to take a call that sucks up all of your precious time and you need to be willing to do the same thing for yourself.

The more you get to know certain parents, the more you will know their working patterns and their ability to talk with you.

Share this information with other staff if you develop it so that they can also benefit from what you’ve found.

Some parents will prefer email communication due to their availability and if this works for you it can be a really powerful way to address concerns that also removes some of the emotion brought by a phonecall – all I would say is to treat it as you would an internal email – keep it professional and respond within your working hours.

It’s also important to make sure that you are aware of who you are calling, and their relationship to the child, and make every effort possible to use the parent/carer’s name.

A pet hate of mine is “Is this Abby’s mum?” – you should be using their title and surname as standard – as part of your introduction confirm who they are, even if it’s the seventeenth time you’ve spoken to them it sets the standard, “Hi, is that Mrs Smith? Ah great, it’s Mr Acton calling from X – how are you? Have you got a few minutes to talk?” and also ensures you are speaking to the right person from a safeguarding perspective.

Be confident in ending a call if it does become problematic – there are some parents/carers who just won’t countenance what you have to say – this may also stretch to abusive language or threats.

This can be for any number of reasons but ultimately you do not come to work to be verbally abused.

If you can feel a conversation is getting heated, then you are probably best to draw it to a close with a more definite statement “I’m hopeful that we can work together to achieve the best for XYZ but I think it’s best if we pick this up again at a later date. Either I, or XYZ, will give you a call back in the next X days – thank you for your time”.

You can then decide if you need to escalate the conversation up the chain and get a more senior member of staff to call to resolve the issue, or whether some breathing room and time to digest the issue will mean you can have the conversation yourself at a later date.

It’s always worth flagging this as an issue to your line manager or SLT as you may not be the only member of staff being put in this situation.

For some staff, communication home is something that brings anxiety and fear – this shouldn’t be the case.

I can count on one hand the number of phone calls home that I’ve made where I’ve ended the call feeling like it was unpleasant.

If you stick to some of the tried and tested approaches discussed here you should be able to develop a script and a methodology for communication that ensures that you always start off on the right foot and, when you don’t, you know how to bring it to a conclusion.

As with anything – the more you do the easier it becomes – for the past however many years I have started every phone call the exact same way (introduction, how are you, have you got time to talk?) and I doubt I’ll ever change that now.

One final tip is to ask a member of staff who you know is regularly in touch with parents if you can shadow them making a couple of difficult calls, particularly to those you may have struggled with, and you’ll soon see that it’s a skill to be honed.

Having parents on your side is one of the greatest tools to have in your toolkit – the knowledge that you and their parents are working in sync is one that strikes fear into the hearts of many a troublemaker and can inspire many students to show their best self.

In a post-covid world I am finding that parents are desperate to communicate and want to find out more about their children than ever – it’s an opportunity to be capitalised on.

Connor Acton
NEC Member
NAPCE

AWARDS: A Report & List of Winners from NAPCE Awards 2021

The winners of the second annual National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education were unveiled at an online ceremony on September 23rd.

More entries than before, very deserving winners and fantastic support from across the education sector characterised NAPCE Awards 2021.

The online event was hosted by former teacher, current marketing expert and NAPCE NEC member Victoria Bownes.

Guests heard a compelling and inspiring ket note speech from Inclusion Expert’s Daniel Sobel, NAPCE Chair Phil Jones also addresses delegates.

Here are the winners and finalists of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021.

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsored by BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland

Royal School Dungannon, Dugannon, Northern Ireland

Oakfield School, Hull

The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester

School for Inspiring Talents, Newton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsored by The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsored by Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire

Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire,

Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire

Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsored by Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London

Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community School, Belmont Durham,

Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year –  Sponsored by NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire,Flourish Personal Development Programme

Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor,TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program

St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme

Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshir

Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull

Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Bromsgrove International School, Thailand

Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern

Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

Stephen Lane, author of ‘Beyond Wiping Noses

 

AWARDS: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones Shares Speech from NAPCE Awards 2021

It is a great pleasure as National Chair of the Association to welcome you to the ceremony for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE.

Once again, this year it is an online event, and it is a pity that we cannot be in the same room to congratulate our winners and finalists.

It does mean that we can be joined tonight by people form all corners of the United Kingdom and indeed from around the world.

It is true to say that the 2020 – 2021 academic year was a difficult and challenging year for education.

It is remarkable how well children and young people have been supported through this period.

Schools have been challenged to find new ways of working and coping with the demands of the latest risk assessment.

Everybody who has worked in pastoral roles and supported learners are heroes in this academic year for the support you have provided and the difference you have made in the learning experience and lives of children and young people.

The nominations for the awards show the brilliant work that is taking place to support learners and all our finalists are an inspiration to all of us and fully deserve the recognition and respect that comes with being nominated.

The experience of the pandemic has raised awareness about the important role education has in supporting the socialisation and well-being of children and young people.

The pastoral work in schools, colleges and higher education often takes place without being noticed and valued but it makes a huge contribution in developing children and young people into positive and well-adjusted members of society.

The pandemic experience has encouraged researchers, writers, and practitioners to revisit what is the purpose of education with greater value being placed on the personal development of children and young people as human beings.

This contribution to a person’s education is important to enable them to make a positive contribution to society and live fulfilled lives.

It is the whole school experience that is important where children and young people learn not just form the content of lessons but also from the interaction with other people, the relationships they build and the experiences they have.

Schools and learning will be different after the pandemic with increasing use of technology for example for virtual parents’ evenings and online learning, but we must not forget that what is important in education is supporting and developing the children and young people in our care and preparing them for successful lives in the future.

It is important as we move towards normal or at least a new normal that we do not lose the value placed on supporting the personal development and well-being of learners that has emerged as being so important following our experience of the pandemic.

One of the best ways to do that is by becoming a member of NAPCE.

I am pleased to say that despite the restrictions of the pandemic the membership of NAPCE has increased.

This highlights the growing interest in supporting children and young people to achieve their full potential.

A special welcome to our new members this evening who may be attending a NAPCE event for the first time.

We look forward to meeting you in person soon and sharing our interest in supporting learners to be successful in their education and to prepare them for their future lives.

If you are not yet a member and you are interested in the care and support of learners, why not keep in contact with our work by visiting the NAPCE website or by contacting NAPCE admin to be added to the circulation list for the free monthly newsletter. We hope that you will follow and support NAPCE’s work by following on Twitter and other social media platforms.

2022 will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE. A number of activities and events are planned to celebrate the 40 years that academics, researchers, writers and practitioners have been working together to promote the importance of care and support as important parts of a person’s educational experience.

These include the publication of a new book about pastoral care edited by NAPCE, special editions of our academic journal and a live conference where we will meet in person to share ideas and good practice, and of course do not forget the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

We are nearly ready for me to hand back to Victoria our host for the evening for the announcement of the winners in each category.

Before I do that, please can I thank everybody who took the time to make a nomination to recognise the excellent good practice taking place in the pastoral care and support of learners.

Please can I thank our sponsors for your support for the 2021 awards, Blue Sky Education, Taylor & Francis, Inclusion Expert, The Association of School and College Leaders, Hult International Business School and The Thrive Approach.

Your support for the education of children and young people by supporting these awards is really appreciated.

Please can I thank our judges, Emeritus Professor Stan Tucker, Emeritus Professor Richard Pring, Associate Professor Anne Emerson and Doctor Noel Purdy for your time and careful consideration of the nominations.

Finally, a huge thank you from NAPCE to everybody who works in pastoral roles or contributes to the development of pastoral care theory and practice for the difference you make every day in the learning experience and future lives of learners.

Enjoy the evening, congratulations to all the finalists and thank you for your support for NAPCE.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

GOOD PRACTICE: Winner of “Best School” at NAPCE Awards 2021 Shares Good Practice Examples

It was a pleasure to celebrate the achievements of winners and finalists highlighted at the National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education 2021 at the presentation event on 23rd September which took place online.

The evening was hosted by NAPCE’s Victoria Bownes and the welcome was given by our National Chair, Phil Jones and the guest presentation by author Daniel Sobel.

It was inspiring to listen to all the good practice that is taking place in pastoral care in education and the contributions that are being made in different ways to innovate and develop new ideas and practice.

This month we are going to focus on the category of Pastoral School of the Year which was sponsored by BlueSky Education.

This category recognises schools that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.
 
The winner of this award in this category, announced at the presentation ceremony was Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland. 

This is the good practice in the school that impressed the judges. 

Limavady High School – How They Won the Award

The PTA funded 60 food hampers for FSM families. Years 11-14 Action Mental Health workshops.

One to one professional mentoring for boys at risk of underachieving.

Worked with UV Arts to provide a ten-week programme for vulnerable pupils.

Dedicated member of staff for lockdown outreach phone calls.

Pastoral Care Google Classroom for child protection and wellbeing.

Staff training: mental health first aid, suicide prevention, ACEs and neglect.

Wellbeing Week activities. Children’s Mental Health week activities.

14 pupils trained as Anti-Bullying Buddies.

RESTORE programme to address lockdown experiences.

Sensory room.

SEN lunch hub.

All Classroom Assistants trained in First Aid.

The judges were also impressed by the work and good practice of the finalists in this category and the positive support they are giving for the children and young people in their care. Here are some examples of that good practice.

The Good Practice Submitted by Finalists in the Category. 

Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland

At RSD there is a clear commitment to deliver outstanding pastoral provision both internally and beyond the school gates. In house, groups such as the pupil led ‘Safer School’ team raise whole school awareness regarding key issues. ‘Safe Space’ drop-in, run by local youth workers, pupils & staff, provides a ‘safe’ place for any pupil in need. There is an extensive preventative curriculum programme firmly embedded into school life. Groups such as AMH, Relax Kids, Youth for Christ & Niamh Louise Foundation are key. ‘Link’ teachers exist & staff have completed a wide range of quality pastoral training. RSD has also been at the heart of the community in organising a community wide mental health awareness campaign. Most recently it has secured funding from local churches, schools and businesses to enable the charity Reach Mentoring to start work in Dungannon.

Oakfield School, Hull

Oakfield School is a Residential co-educational school specialising in Social, Emotional, and Mental Health. Our passion for a whole school approach to pupils wellbeing is outstanding. The quality of our pastoral care influences the ethos and tone of the whole school alongside our enriched, engaging 24hr curriculum in a safe learning environment. During the pandemic staff have delivered food parcels, made weekly phone calls visited pupils and their families and paid for laptops/dongles for every pupil to support learning. Staffs determination to ensure pupils and their families wellbeing has remained Paramount is incredible. This is my reason for nominating Oakfield.

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

 This year, the school has supported pupils and families in more ways than usual. During lockdown, staff made weekly calls home, or more where needed. When issues were identified such as finance, housing or food issues, the team reacted quickly and liaised with agencies. Staff arranged for the food bank to provide food or dropped parcels off ourselves. School remained open for most and we introduced the Thrive programme to provide bespoke wellbeing interventions. We started art therapy and arranged alpaca, horse and gardening interventions for some. Parent support sessions were provided online and posted on a You Tube channel.

School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

As a school with a demonstrable commitment to pastoral care that is making a significant positive impact on our students’ social and emotional development, we would be delighted to be recognised by The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education. School for Inspiring Talents is an innovative independent therapeutic day school based in South Devon.  Established in 2014, it was set up with a clear vision to help transform the life chances of young people who have experienced childhood trauma.   We have a team of 73 dedicated teaching, clinical, therapeutic and office staff, supporting 53 students who have previously struggled in mainstream settings. The high staff:student ratio means that our students benefit from holistic pastoral support that meets their specific needs, helping them to overcome their individual barriers to learning.    Our innovative approach to education and commitment to pastoral care has delivered enormous impact on the lives of our students and their families. Feeling safe and secure with our dedicated team, our students WANT to come to school each day. They are able to build trusted relationships with staff as well as peer relationships with other students. We are privileged to see enormous progress with the children – something as small as giving eye contact, saying ‘good morning’, or playing with others can be a significant achievement for our students. Seeing their confidence and self-worth flourish is incredibly rewarding for staff. Our core values to Care, Nurture and Inspire, form the bedrock of our organisation as we support every learner to reach their individual potential. 100% of the children in our school have a specialist Education, Health and Care Plan with social and emotional mental health issues diagnosed as their primary need. Many are in care. On average at least 70% of have witnessed domestic violence, 68% have experienced physical and/or sexual abuse; 61% come from homes with parental mental health concerns and 92% are classified as having Type 3 Trauma (Complex Interpersonal Trauma). Many of the children are unable to use language to talk about their experiences. Several have been persistent school refusers in their previous school career. Our emphasis on pastoral care and support comes from the top; Mark Escott, Co-Founder of School for Inspiring Talents, experienced an abusive and chaotic childhood himself. As a dyslexic, he found school difficult and he found escape through drugs and crime, which later led to a two-year spell living in a hostel for young men on probation. Despite leaving school with no qualifications, Mark went on to carve out an impressive career as a child and adolescent behaviour specialist, working therapeutically with young people and families within the Social Care, Health and Education sectors. Driven by watching children slip through the net in mainstream schools, Mark set up Life Chance Education Ltd and went on to open School for Inspiring Talents to help transform the life chances of young people in our communities.  Based in school, our Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) provide a range of therapies to support our children’s individual needs.   Our MDT includes: Consultant Clinical Psychologist  Occupational Therapist  Speech and Language Therapist  Mental Health Practitioner  Trauma Recovery Practitioners  Family Support Workers  Therapeutic Outdoor Practitioner  Blu – our very special therapy dog. Our MDT work closely with teachers and support staff to ensure that students grow socially and emotionally alongside their educational development. A range of therapeutic assessments and methods are used by the team to help identify and support each student’s specific developmental needs. We have two Pastoral Co-ordinators at the school who each take the lead for our pastoral care across our two sites.  As TIS Practitioners (Trauma Informed Schools), they are the first point of contact for student and staff wellbeing in the school. Our Pastoral Co-ordinators oversee the strategies in place to help provide our students with the care and support they need to reach their potential.

Congratulations to all the finalists in this category for the excellent work you are doing to support learners and thank you to the nominees who highlighted this good practice that is taking place.

We hope to have nominations from the schools for the 2022 Awards to share more information about the good practice taking place.

REPORT: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones’ Report from the Organisation’s October NEC Meeting

The National Executive Committee (NEC) of the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE) met on Saturday 9thOctober.

Once again it was an online meeting because of the uncertainty of travelling from different parts of the United Kingdom and Europe caused by the pandemic.

It is frustrating that we are still unable to meet in person, but a sensible approach seems to be appropriate with members of NEC travelling long distances to attend.

Thanks to the commitment of members of NEC and the administrative support we were able to continue to be positive about the work of NAPCE and about plans, but it is not the same as being able to meet together to share ideas and discuss issues.

This is especially true because we have people who have recently joined NEC who we have not been able to meet in person.

Let us hope that this changes soon, and we will be able to be in the same room and fully involved in discussions and planning for future activities.

The meeting had a full agenda and covered a large amount of business to enable the association to continue its work and engagement with educationalists who share our interest in pastoral care and support for learners.

The meeting is an opportunity for members of NEC to update each other about their work on behalf of NAPCE since the last meeting.

An item about strategic planning included a discussion about using online opportunities to develop links with professionals working in different regions and to raise their awareness about NAPCE.

Jill Robson the national secretary provided an update about NEC elections and membership, and it was very encouraging to hear that there has been a large increase in the membership of the Association in the last year.

It is hoped that membership will continue to grow as NAPCE supports schools to respond to the challenges of the pandemic and how to meet the mental health and personal developments needs of children and young people.

The NEC were updated about the administrative support arrangements for the Association and given a positive report about the financial situation.

A report on publicity and marketing showed that the increased engagement with NAPCE continues.

Contact is being made with the Association through social media, the website and telephone.

Professor Stan Tucker, the Editor of the Associations academic journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ provided a very encouraging report with the number of articles being submitted for publication increasing and the international reputation of the journal growing.

A report was provided about the 2021 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education, following the awards ceremony organised by NAPCE in September.

There were more nominations in 2021 than in the previous year and the judges were very impressed by the excellent examples of good practice that were highlighted.

The presentation Ceremony took place online and was very well attended on the evening.

The guest speaker was the author, Daniel Sobel. The winners were announced, and their plaques have been sent to them in the post.

Some of the comments on the chat during the evening included

“Great presentation. Thank you, Daniel”
“Thank you to the NAPCE team for getting this together”
“Well done everyone and thanks for organising such a great event”
“Lovely to hear you so happy. Well done Achieve NI”
“Thanks for organising such a wonderful event!”
“Thanks to everyone, so proud of the team at LHS”

Plans were discussed for the 2022 Awards, and it was agreed that they would be launched in November.

Launch November 2021
Nominations Open November 2021
Nominations Close May 30th 2022
Judging Completed Friday 25th June 2022
Tickets for Presentation Available July 2022
Invitations to Attend Presentation July 2022
Presentation Event Autumn 2022

The meeting included a report on NAPCE activities in the last few months and although they have been restricted by the pandemic it has seen plenty of engagement and contact with educationalists form different parts of the UK and around the world. The online conference organised in the Spring was a huge success with over 900 people showing an interest in the conference on the NAPCE Eventbrite page. The conference included presentations on current pastoral topics and a ‘Question Time’ with an invited panel. Tickets sold out four weeks before the event and delegates attended from as far away as Sydney, Nairobi, North Vancouver and Lima.

These were some of the comments from delegates
“Absolutely brilliant. Just what I need at the moment”
“To all the presenters, well done”
“Really enjoyed the whole conference. Thank you to everyone at NAPCE”
“Very interesting Question time hosted by NAPCE and some thought provoking contributions”
“Excellent discussion with some interesting diverse ideas”
“Thank you NAPCE for organising a great event and providing the opportunity to explore some important current issues”
“Great webinar. Very useful.  Thank you NAPCE”

Next year will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE since it first started supporting Pastoral care in Education in 1982.

Several ideas for events and activities were discussed to celebrate the anniversary with plans for a weekend of events in the Autumn.

More details will be provided on social media, on the website and of course in future editions of the NAPCE monthly newsletter.

In the afternoon there was a meeting of the editorial Board which manages the Associations’ academic journal.

The next meeting of the NEC along with the AGM is planned for Saturday 26th March 2022.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE News – September 2021

NAPCE News – September 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: LGBT+ Issues in Schools: a Reflection on the First Anniversary of the Introduction of Statutory Relationships & Sex Education in England & Wales by Max Biddulph

LGBT+ issues in schools: a reflection on the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education in England and Wales by Max Biddulph

September 2021 marks the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) in England and Wales, following a campaign by researchers, practitioners and activists in the field over two decades, to secure a more solid footing for this subject in schools.

Along with PSHE, this subject not only comprises a strong component of the pastoral curriculum, it also informs the pastoral interventions that teachers make on a daily basis with children and young people on a one to one.

Being a gay man of ‘a certain age’ I know from my own ‘educational back-story’ why feeling included and supported in a personal identity is so important in sustaining a sense of self-esteem and associated feelings of agency, needed for personal growth and educational success.

These are not only conditions that I want for me, I feel they are absolutely fundamental for all human beings in the world. Given this backdrop, I would like to share with you some observations on this, the first anniversary of the new ‘curricular-pastoral environment’ in the teaching of LGBT+ issues in RSE.

Historically, a tension has always existed between the concepts of ‘schooling’ and ‘sexualities’ and in the UK context, attempts by the state to control the messaging to children and young people about sexuality and gender is characterised by legislation such as the now infamous Section 28 of the Local Government Act, 1988.

Developments in the new millennium changed this stance and a combination of homophobic/transphobic bullying research, calls from practitioners, pressure from LGBT+ Communities and the legal implications of the Equality Act 2010, have combined to create the antecedents for reform.

Given that schools are now required to teach either Relationships Education (primary) or Relationships and Sex Education (secondary), it was perhaps inevitable that the inclusion of LGBT+ issues would have the potential to initiate another round of controversy.

In her article ‘LGBT teaching in primary school: equality, discrimination and freedom of expression’ (Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 42(2) 243-245), Emma Nottingham (2020) captures what was in 2019, perhaps the peak moment in the challenge between members of mainly British Pakistani community and an inner-city primary school where weeks of protest on the street outside the school culminated in a legal injunction being sought by Birmingham City Council to restrict the street gatherings and the online abuse made via social media of staff teaching the Relationships Education curriculum.

At the heart of this dispute is the question as to whether it is appropriate to teach primary school children about a range of relationships and identities that exist in society i.e. heterosexual, same-sex etc.

In the case of Birmingham City Council vs Afsar, Nottingham (2020) notes that the ruling by Mr Justice Warby who found in favour of the city council, drew on both the UK Equality Act 2010 and the European Convention on Human Rights.  With regard to the latter, Justice Warby stated that his judgement sought to strike a balance between Article 10 (freedom of expression), Article 8 (right to private and family life), Article 9 (freedom of thought conscience and religion and Article 11 (freedom of association). This is an important judgement for two reasons:

  1. It sets a precedent in the legal acceptance of Relationships and Sex Education to be taught in an inclusive way i.e portraying the full range of sexualities and relationships
  2. It shines a light of the extraordinarily complex territory that education has to navigate in terms of culture, values and what constitutes ‘age-appropriate knowledge’.

In responding to the challenge of teaching RSE in schools where cultural diversity is very prominent, a number of really significant implications emerge.

The first of these relates to the need for a really robust stance when it comes to the ways in which equality diversity and inclusion will be addressed in the day-to-day activity of the school.

Having worked with colleagues in the school at the centre of the dispute, I can see that their stance on this is the bedrock of their practice, and the mechanism that ultimately lead to a legal resolution of the issue. This ‘whole school approach’ permeates not just the statements in policies that position the schools’ values but communicates the need for respect in all relationships in the school community.

The latter requires incredibly sensitive handling and an ability to engage in assertive communication that simultaneously ‘holds’ and respects the range of diversity.

In the post local education authority era where specialist professional development has to be sought further afield, I would urge schools not to struggle with these issues on their own. Specialist advice is available from national organisations such as the Sex Education Forum/National Childrens Bureau, who can advise for example, on consultations/information giving for parents about the content and delivery of RSE.

A second ‘implication’ relates to the ways in which communities and identities are understood by practitioners. An unsettling dimension of the dispute is the fact that the issues cut across sensitive domains of race, culture, faith, ethnicity and sexuality.

It would be easy to stereotype individuals based on these dimensions and the problem with this is that it leads to blind spots which obscure the complexity of intersectionality. With a more open mind it is possible to see how for example, a young person of British Pakistani heritage could find themselves curious or questioning their sexual orientation.

Fifty years of narratives of LGBT+ experience has taught us what a potentially lonely and difficult place this is, emotionally. Having an identity acknowledged or affirmed albeit in the form of a passing reference, could be crucial to longer term experience of self-esteem.

Since these tumultuous events of 2019, life in the school briefly returned to normal and the street outside fell silent again.

The arrival of the Covid-19 global pandemic with all the diversion and disruption that ensued, has briefly drawn a curtain over the new dawn of RSE in schools in England and Wales.

The issue of mental well-being in school communities has surfaced as a key consideration and this illuminates a final implication emerging from the case.

Staff self-care needs to be paramount especially in situations where staff find themselves caught in situations where strongly held values and emotions are being expressed in relation to the inclusion of LGBT+ issues.

Some comfort can be taken from the fact that legal injunctions can be taken out to prevent the online abuse of school staff via social media and the fact as Nottingham (2020:245) observes:
‘that sex and relationships education can be capable of reflecting various relationship types whist respecting the values and cultures and religions that advocate heterosexual relationships’.

Max Biddulph, Chair Editorial Board, Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

AWARDS: Tickets Available for NAPCE Awards 2021

National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021

Excitement is building ahead of for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 Presentation Event this month.

This important event in the educational calendar takes place this year online on Thursday 23rd September at 7pm.

Join with NAPCE to celebrate the good practice in pastoral care in education as the winners in each category are announced.

There are a few remaining tickets for links to the event. Follow this link to register. https://napceawardspresentation2021.eventbrite.co.uk/

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsor BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Finalists
Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland
Oakfield School
The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester
Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland
School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsor – The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Finalists
The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London
All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire
Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland
Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsor- Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Finalists
Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire
Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland, nominated by Laura Fisher
Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire
Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire
Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsor  Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Finalists
Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland
Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community SchoolBelmont Durham
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester
Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year – Sponsor NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Finalists
Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program
St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum
Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire, Flourish Personal Development Programme
The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme
Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

Finalists
Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull
Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School,Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire
AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Finalists
Bromsgrove International School, Thailand
Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern
Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsor -The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

To be announced at the event.
 

RESEARCH: Invitation to Take Part in Research Focused on Online Safety for Young People

NAPCE has been informed about some important research into keeping young people safe online.

The researchers who have been guest writers for NAPCE News and recently presented at the NAPCE online conference are recruiting parents in the UK who have at least one child aged 13-18.

They have provided us with the following details.

“We are a team of researchers interested in learning how parents of youth (aged 13 to 18) such as you perceive the impact of COVID-19 on the sexual and gendered risks and harms that young people face online.

“By completing this survey, you would be helping to inform resources for young people, teachers, and parents on how to stay safe online during the pandemic and beyond.”

Link to the survey: https://form.typeform.com/to/hCwcfzF5?typeform-source=t.co

Thanks!
Kaity

Dr.Kaitlynn Mendes
Associate Professor of Sociology
Western University”

EVENT: Pastoral Leaders Invited to Attend New Pastoral Forum

NAPCE is pleased to have been invited to attend the Pastoral Forum for the recently formed International Forum for Inclusive Practitioners by Inclusion Expert who are one of the sponsors for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 being organised by NAPCE.

They have sent NAPCE the following details.

“We’d like to remind all those with a pastoral interest that the Pastoral Forum is next week on Thursday 23rd at 2pm London BST.

If you know of any pastoral leaders, please let them know about it.

For more details and to find out about the link to this forum please contact

Lesley Bradley
Secretary to Daniel Sobel, CEO
lesley.bradley@inclusionexpert.com

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE News – August 2021

NAPCE News – August 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: NAPCE’s Dr Julianne Brown explores pastoral leadership in schools as approach”Normality”

Pastoral leadership in schools, new challenges, new perspectives, new leaders?

There is much talk and hope about a “return to normal” in education for the new school year.

A brief look at the word ‘normal’ in the Oxford Dictionary online suggests ‘normal’ as “typical, usual, or ordinary; what you would expect”.

In a global pandemic, there is no ‘typical, usual or ordinary’.

As we progress through the pandemania of COVID 19, the only certainty is uncertainty.

In this article I take a look at senior pastoral leadership in schools and question the idea of whether we can, or even should, attempt a return to what was ‘normal’ in our education systems.

Effective leadership in pastoral care in schools has never been more vital. Could we use this unprecedented time to reflect on old practices and reimagine pastoral care in education?

A search for wellbeing and/or pastoral care roles in the Times Educational Supplement, or the Education job sector of The Guardian reveals the welcome variety of new positions being offered in schools. Many positions are assistant or middle leadership roles.

But what about the senior leadership level?

On the rare occasions that a pastoral position in the senior leadership team is advertised, the essential criteria for the post will often specify qualified teacher status (QTS).

I would argue that strategic pastoral leadership requires a specific skill set that may or may not be found in a qualified teacher.

In these different times, is it conceivable that we can question these established practices and do things differently?

Let’s start by thinking about the upcoming school year and the new buzzword “catch-up”.

The effects of school closures, the absence of face-to-face teaching and the shift to online/ hybrid learning has negatively impacted the learning of many children and young people across the world (UNESCO et al 2021).

Calls to bridge the gap abound with some Government funding available for the most vulnerable students (UKGov 2021).

Possible solutions to make up for the ‘lost learning’ are the National Tutoring Programme in the UK, peer tutoring and summer schools.

How are we expected to cope with the pressures of this new ‘catch-up’ agenda in schools?

Demands for extra learning outside of the school day, during weekends and holidays and persistent reminders to fill the learning gaps will inevitably bring extra stresses and strains.

It is difficult to state the long-term effects of the last 18 months on the mental health and wellbeing of the school community but what we know at the moment is that many people are suffering.

The disruptive nature of the global pandemic has affected our personal, social and political lives and left many feeling vulnerable, isolated, confused and even fearful about what lies ahead, questioning how we understand the world and our place in it.

The COVID 19 pandemic has raised awareness of mental health issues and highlighted the importance of social and emotional wellbeing in schools. It has reinforced the inextricable link between our wellbeing and the possibilities for effective teaching and learning.

In the coming weeks, months and even years, it will be important not to lose sight of this when driving forward with the ‘catch-up’ agenda.

Indeed, the suggestion that students can ‘catch-up’ to a pre-Covid 19 learning trajectory may in itself be unrealistic.

On a more positive note, it is at these points in time, when our worlds have been shaken up, that new possibilities come into view.

This is a time for innovation and creativity as we begin to shape new ways of thinking about education and school as a social space.

It is a time to prioritise excellence in pastoral care, to strengthen our relationships and ensure safe, kind, caring, supportive environments for learning.

Excellence requires leadership, vision and compassion. In these unprecedented times we need senior pastoral leaders, with a strategic capability, who have a deep understanding of the wellbeing/learning space, who are able to challenge entrenched views and open dialogue as a platform to new ways of being.

Here, I ask that we take a minute to reflect on Senior Leadership in pastoral care.

What is the job profile of the Senior Leader in Pastoral Care? Of course, this is not an exhaustive list, but I offer it to encourage a process of reflection and discussion:

The Senior Pastoral Leader:

  • Develops a whole school approach – pastoral care is not an outlier, a separate element of the school. Much like health and safety at work, pastoral care is everyone’s responsibility. Pastoral care underpins effective learning, but it sits alongside policy and practice, and needs to be embedded in every decision, at every level, along the way.
  • Is language aware! An example could be the “catch-up” agenda, the “lost school time”. Think of how it might feel, to a child who may already be struggling, to constantly hear that you have ‘gaps’ in your learning and that you have to work harder to catch up, otherwise….! Pastoral leaders need to model the language of support and encouragement.
  • Understands that teacher wellbeing is a critical factor for effective teaching and learning. The Teacher Wellbeing Index 2018 (ESP 2018) stated that 67% of teachers described themselves as stressed (80% of Senior Leaders). This was pre-COVID. Teachers and staff are a critical resource in schools and teacher wellbeing has been shown to affect the quality of their teaching and learning. Therefore, prioritising staff wellbeing is an essential component of senior leadership (TES, 2020). Who can manage these competing goals in favour of wellbeing?
  • Cares for those who care. At a conference I organised at our school for professionals working in pastoral care, one of the reoccurring points was the stress of ‘caring’. COVID 19 has made its own particular demands on our health and welfare services. The pastoral leader takes time to listen, takes action to remove unnecessary barriers to effective working practices, gives praise and is inclusive.
  • Makes time for professional development in the area of mental health and wellbeing for all staff e.g. how to recognise potential and actual problems; referral pathways; coping strategies; how to proactively promote student wellbeing in the classroom. Doesn’t assume that people naturally know how to promote wellbeing.
  • Ensures support systems are transparent, easily accessible and available for staff and students
  • Doesn’t shy away from asking the difficult questions

The senior pastoral leader requires a comprehensive understanding of teaching and learning in schools as well as in-depth knowledge of the field of mental health and wellbeing.

They demonstrate empathy, kindness and compassion in their relationships with others. They listen actively to foster personal and professional relationships.

This is the basis for excellence in pastoral care.

I welcome your thoughts.

Dr Julianne Brown
NAPCE Officer

References:
Education Support (2021)Teacher burnout: help & support. https://www.educationsupport.org.uk/teacher-burnout-help-support (accessed 10.08.2021)

TES, 2020: Staff Wellbeing Report: October 2020

UKGov (4.2021) : Education, universities and childcare during coronavirus: Guidance Catch-up premium: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/catch-up-premium-coronavirus-covid-19/catch-up-premium (accessed 11.08.2021)

UNESCO, UNICEF, The World Bank and OECD, (2021) : What’s Next? Lessons On Education Recovery: Findings From A Survey Of Ministries Of Education Amid The Covid-19 Pandemic

REPORT: “From the Chair” with NAPCE Chief Phil Jones

From the Chair by Phil Jones

I am sure that this year the summer break will be very welcome, and more important than ever before, to everybody working in pastoral roles in education.

I remember the summer holidays in three different stages.

The first two weeks was recovery time where I realised that there was more to life than coping with the latest demands being made on educational professionals.

The middle two weeks were a time for reading and thinking positively about opportunities to develop new ideas and implement improvements for the benefit of the learners in our care.

In the final two weeks I tended to spend the time convincing myself that this year would be better than the last and counting the days down to when life would become hectic again and feeling a little frustrated that time would once again be rationed for family, friends, and myself.

I always had mixed feelings about the first day back at work.

I was not keen about having to get up at a certain time and having my time during the day organised for me, but it was also good to meet colleagues and students again and make a difference for learners with new energy and motivation.

This highlights why the summer break is so important for professionals working in education, to be able to recharge yourself both physically and mentally in preparation for new challenges and opportunities.

It is also a reminder of how important it is to look after your physical health and mental health with a sensible work/life balance during the academic year.

The new academic year is a fresh start and an opportunity to focus on what really matters in your role and to reflect on how you can make a positive contribution to improve the learning experience and life chances of the children and young people in your care.

Planning and setting goals in September creates the motivation and inspiration to keep going when you face the challenges that are part of every academic year and will remind you later in the year about what your priorities are despite what other demands are made for your time and attention.

My summer reading included the book, ‘Successful conversations in school’ by Sonia Gill.

In the book she describes a process of group development from Bruce Tuckman.

Forming – where the groups from and expectations are explored
Storming – where boundaries and expectations are challenged
Norming – where there is some agreement about what is expected and the boundaries
Performing – where the agreed norms and boundaries mean that positive work can take place.

This can be applied to my experience of the school year.

In September there is a motivation to explore better ways of working and new ideas and initiatives.

As a headteacher I can remember in the first few weeks of the academic year how colleagues would come and tell me how well their classes were doing.

Then comes the storming period which in my experience takes place around November with the weather deteriorating and the added distractions for people working with children and young people of Halloween, bonfire night and the darker evenings with the clocks going back.

During this period my experience as a headteacher was of colleagues coming me to tell me how impossible it is to work with my children.

This is the time when expectations and boundaries are being challenged as learners and adults explore what the norms will be.

Sonia Gill describes this as a positive process where if issues are examined and discussed a positive working culture can be developed.

The time spent on resolving disagreements leads to the norming period where there is an acceptance of the boundaries and although it is the nature of young people to keep testing them there is a shared view of what is expected.

In my experience this does not really start to appear until the second term, so it is important to understand that the challenge and questioning of rules and boundaries is a normal process that we must work through.

Eventually the reward for all the effort invested in the process comes with the performing stage when there is some shared sense of purpose of what we are working towards.

It is frustrating that with many students they seem to arrive at this point just as they are about to leave the school and the adults are left wondering why we couldn’t get to this way of working earlier, without all the effort being spent on resolving conflicts and reinforcing expectations.

Resolving conflicts and establishing a positive learning culture will always be part of the work of staff in pastoral roles in schools.

This was especially true in the last academic year because of the additional challenges form the pandemic.

Reading the nominations for the 2021 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education it was clear what inspirational work is taking place in pastoral care.

It was great to see that nominations were being made from all parts of the UK and some from other countries across the world and from many different schools and educational organisations.

There were so many brilliant examples of good practice and innovations to respond to challenges and provide excellent pastoral care and support for learners.

It has also become clear how vital this work is for supporting the socialisation of children and young people to enable them to become positive members of society.

NAPCE is pleased to have this opportunity to share the good practice by organising the annual awards and to contribute to inspiring professionals to find effective responses to new challenges and to make a real difference in the future life chances of learners.

The winners in the eight categories will be announced at a Presentation event that takes place at 7-00pm on Thursday 23rd September.

Once again because of the uncertainty about restrictions for the pandemic it will be an online event.

We hope that once again colleagues will make an evening of the event and join with NAPCE,  to celebrate the achievements of everybody who was nominated and to congratulate the winners.

There are a limited number of tickets for the event and they can be reserved by visiting Eventbrite.

There is no limit to how many people can join a link to be part of the event so why not arrange to dress up for the evening and organise the celebratory drinks!

Tickets for the presentation Event are free and to reserve your place and for more details please follow the link:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/presentation-for-the-2021-national-awards-for-pastoral-care-in-education-tickets-165522423023?utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-medium=discovery&utm-term=listing&utm-source=cp&aff=escb

The national awards are an important reminder of the excellent work that is being done in pastoral care to support young people to achieve their full potential from their education despite the difficulties and challenges that we face every day.

The increased interest in the work of NAPCE, demonstrates what a positive impact effective pastoral care can have in supporting learners and improving their future life chances.

NAPCE followers on social media have increased, there is more contact with the Association from people who share our interests in pastoral care and the number of memberships of the Association which includes a subscription to the respected international academic journal, ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ is increasing.

NAPCE is looking forward to our 40th anniversary year in 2022.

The Association has been supporting pastoral care in education and sharing good practice for 40 years and the passion to continue making a positive contribution to the learning experience of learners and their preparation for their future lives is as strong as it has ever been.

The National Executive Committee are planning events and activities to celebrate the anniversary, and these include the publication of a new book about pastoral care by Cambridge Scholars and a Conference where we hope to once again be able to meet each other in person.

For the latest news and information about NAPCE please visit the website napce.org.uk and follow NAPCE on social media. (TWITTER @NAPCE1). For information about membership or anything else please contact us by email on admin@napce.org.uk

NAPCE is looking forward to working with our members and supporters in the new academic year, to continue making a positive contribution to supporting children and young people to enable them to achieve success in their education and future lives.

All my best wishes
Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

 

ARTICLE: “Supporting students to take control of leaked explicit images” published on schoolsweek.co.uk

NAPCE was created almost 40 years ago and we’ve been at the heart of pastoral care development for that time.

From as far back as the 1980s we’ve been sharing great practice and actively engaging in matters of the day affecting the wellbeing of young people in education.

Once upon a time we flicked through the newspapers on a daily basis to stay abreast of reported developments across education but more recently we have been sharing links to articles published online which relate to the wellbeing of young people.

These are matters that people working in pastoral care roles or associated positions in schools should be aware of.

In this edition of NAPCE News, we are keen to share an article published on the Schools Week website on 17th August, 2021.

The article is written by Suzanne Houghton and it is this month’s recommended read.

Read it here: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/supporting-students-to-take-control-of-leaked-explicit-images/

NAPCE News – July 2021

NAPCE News – July 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: Summer Sun & Self Discovery by NAPCE Officer Victoria Bownes

Summer Sun & Self Discovery by Victoria Bownes

As we unlock fully from lockdown take the time to capture the opportunities around you and develop your skill set all the more.

Self-discovery has been a drive for many with the year that has passed.

Developing new ways of learning has been a huge challenge and pressure for many.

Growing as professionals in education or indeed being a committed student and preparing for milestones and new phases of their own educational journey has placed a burden on working longer hours, having greater screen time and fundamentally missing the chance to interact fully with one another.

Adaptations have been made by thousands of students across the world to be more effective remote learners.

By instilling greater organisation skills and running a busy working day from home has been the biggest change for many over the past academic year or so.

For learners to be achieving fully pastoral leaders have continually needed to guide and inspire students to navigate their way through learning and striking a balance of being prepared for assessments and online presentations.

At NAPCE we have been continually supporting our followers with new interventions and ideas as to how to spend their time during lockdown and we have provided Pastoral Leaders across the country with inspiration as to how to support pupils during these unprecedented times.

It is therefore equally as important to share our vision for the unlocking of lockdown in the final phase which the country has been waiting for in great anticipation.

Now is the time for all communities of any profession to step foot into the summer ahead with tremendous excitement to rediscover their hidden talents.

The social interaction is of tremendous importance and all that it brings to people of all ages is to be cherished and made pivotal in the move to engage fully with others once again.

As we are all fully aware children of a young age strive forwards quickly with positive social interaction.

It is indeed equally as important for Primary and Secondary School aged pupils to capture this summer ahead and make the most of the opportunities of holiday clubs and recreational activities to compliment the program of hard studying which has been the focus for many over recent months.

Pastoral care is all around us and the small encouragement that one can give to the next person is so vital as we all look to rebuild our lives fully and interact even more with each other in the future.

So do encourage people around you to utilise their free time and build their skills set.

By doing so, it is indeed these hobbies and interests which will help many to grow in confidence as they immerge in new places, universities and colleges across the country and build new positive relationships in the months ahead.

Building self-esteem and maintaining positivity is the best mindset to be an effective learner.

Take the time to build your own portfolio of skills and enjoy the journey of rediscovering your own abilities, talents and strengths.

Victoria Bownes
NAPCE Officer

#Encourageotherstodevelopthierskills #Developinghobbies #ArtDesignSportMusic&Drama #Enjoythegreatoutdoors #Newchapters&goalsetting #Growthmindest #PastoralCare2021

REPORT: NAPCE Annual National Conference 2021 – Does Every Child Still Matter?

In July NAPCE organised its first online national conference over three days.

There were presentations on the first day on different pastoral care topics, a Question Time panel on the second day and more presentations on the final day.

It was an excellent opportunity to reflect on the current challenges facing pastoral care and to share ideas on how to respond to these challenges in the future.

The conference brought together experts in pastoral care and delegates with an interest in pastoral care in educations from different parts of the United Kingdom and using the power of the internet form around the world.

Recordings of all presentations and the Question Time from the three days of the conference are available on ‘catch up’ by following this link to the NAPCE website
https://www.napce.org.uk/napce-conference-2021-watch-a-replay-here/

This is a sample of some of the brilliant feedback sent to NAPCE following the conference.

  • “Thank you for the brilliant presentations last
    week. It was a very amazing and thought-provoking conference”
  • “Thank you NAPCE for organising the brilliant conference ‘Does Every Child Matter? A New Approach to Education’, I enjoyed all the speakers and found it to be very motivating and inspiring”
  • “I really enjoyed the conference; The whole conference was excellent. Well done on organising such a good event online”
  • “Congratulations, on a very successful event”
  • “Thank you for the conference. It actually gave me a new insight into my own teenager”
  • “Thank you to all the speakers. You have really hit the nail on the head in so many ways. Extremely useful; and given me lots to think about”
  • “Thank you NAPCE and everybody involved in contributing to the conference. The speakers were positive and inspiring”
  • “The Question Time was a brilliant opportunity to listen to different views about issues that are important to schools and educationalists”
  • “Thank you to everyone on the Question Time panel and in the audience for your thought-provoking conversations.  The Question Time was an excellent discussion with lots of diverse ideas”
  • “Absolutely brilliant! Just what I need at the moment. Lots to think about as I start planning for the return to school in September for staff and students. Thank you”
  • “Thank you for such wonderful presentations from all the presenters. Clear and interesting talks. Well done”
  • “Thank you so much for everybody’s time and contributions. I am a Scottish NQT and appreciate seminars such as this trying to soak up as much info and preparation as possible before I dive into teaching full time in August”

The Conference opened on the afternoon with a presentation from, Dr Kaitlyn Mendes, from, Leicester University and Dr Tanya Horeck, from Anglia Ruskin University, on the important topic of Combatting Online Sexual Harassment – Why we need RSE More Than Ever. 

The presentation provided information on an issue that is very current and made delegates aware of the implications for all schools.

It was clear that this is not something that schools can respond to just with new policies, but a change is needed in school cultures and the pastoral care that is provided.

Free training for teachers is available in the new academic year for sex and relationship education by contacting The School of Sexuality Education at info@schoolofsexed.org
 
The next Presentation was from Lee Pritchard, Head of UK Development, The Thrive Approach, who are partners of NAPCE and one of the sponsors of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education, organised by NAPCE.

 

Lee’s interesting presentation explained more about resilience and why it is so important. Lee explored how our brains and bodies work together (or not); what we can do to build our own robust self-regulation systems and then help the children and young people we work with to do the same; and how this will ensure that they are then in a much better place to access learning and thrive!

The presentation highlighted the importance of a whole school approach to supporting learners to achieve their full potential.

It encouraged delegates to reflect on what effective pastoral care should look like in the 21st century.
 
The final presentation on the first day was from Connor Acton who is a pastoral leader and teacher in Leicester and a member of NAPCE’s National Executive Committee.

Connor’s presentation considered what we have learned from the tests, trials and tribulations brought about by COVID-19 and how they will impact on Pastoral Care as we move into the future. 

It discussed the challenges we may face in the future and how we can take the lessons learned and ensure that Pastoral Care in our schools is effective.

Connor gave a positive report on how attitudes to learning have improved as learners have returned to school and the challenge is how to sustain this improvement.

It encouraged teachers to reflect on how pastoral systems can support learners to develop positive relationships and the implications for staff training in the future to ensure that staff develop understanding and empathy for learners. 
 
On the Thursday evening it was Question Time with a panel of guest experts to answer questions and share ideas with delegates in the audience.

In the Chair was Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE and on the panel were Assistant Professor Mark Diacopoulos, Pittsburg State University USA, Nigel Patrick Murray MBE, a retired British Paralympic athlete, Daniel Sobel, author and the founder and Lead Consultant of Inclusion ExpertDr Noel Purdy, Director of Research and Scholarship at Stranmillis University College, Belfast, and deputy editor of NAPCE’s academic Journal, ’Pastoral Care in Education’, Margaret Mulholland, the Inclusion Policy Advisor for the Association of School and College leaders (ASCL), and Michelle de Middelaer, an experienced educational consultant for ‘Learning through Leadership’.

The first question was “Is it more important to change how schools are organised or how young people learn?” 

This led to an interesting discussion about the future of schools with views shared by members of the panel and in the audience.

One suggestion was that Covid-19 could be seen as the ‘wrecking ball’ for education which provides an opportunity to think about what schools should be about and why we need schools in the 21st century.

It was recognised that covid had highlighted just how much work schools do in supporting the educational progress and personal development of young people.

The increased focus on pastoral care that this had encouraged was an opportunity.  

A question about mobile telephones in schools which had been raised in one of the presentations on the first day of the conference raised some issues to be considered in planning and delivering pastoral care and support in schools.

There were different views in response to the questions with some suggestions that schools would want to control anything that was seen as a risk to learning with others commenting that schools needed to teach learners how to use technology safely.

The discussions raised awareness that staff working in school will not fully understand the experience that children and young people have had in the last 18 months and that empathy is important for all adults who are going to be working with children and young people in the future.  
 
The first presentation of the final morning of the conference was from Helen Peter. 

Helen Peter is a teacher, trainer, published writer and author, and inspirational presenter. 

She has worked in over 400 schools and organisations, in all phases, training staff in pastoral care, circle time and mental and emotional health. 

She is the author of “Making the Most of Tutor Time”. 

Helen shared her considerable experience with delegates including ideas for building sound relationships using techniques, activities, and games to engage them.

She provided some excellent practical advice for example on the importance of body language and tone and not just what is said by teachers and adults working with children and young people.

The presentation raised some interesting questions about how online learning has changed learners’ perceptions about their learning experience. 
 

The next presenter was Maria O, Neil who is an experienced pastoral leader, researcher, and advanced skills teacher.

Maria is the founder of Pastoral Support UK and currently works as a pastoral leader in a school as well as various key roles to provide sustainable pastoral training and raise the profile of pastoral leadership nationwide.

Maria has worked as a partner of NAPCE to organise pastoral conferences in the past.

In the autumn term Maria will start a new challenge as a Deputy Headteacher in a school in London.

Maria used the ideas and research from her book published in April 2021, ‘Proactive Pastoral Care.  

Nurturing happy, healthy, and successful learners.’  

The presentation explained why there is a need for a proactive approach to pastoral care in schools.

It will explore how pastoral care in schools can empower students to make healthy life choices, take care of their wellbeing and reach their full potential in school and beyond.

It was clear from Maria’s presentation how her values and beliefs motivate and guide her in her pastoral work.

She started by explaining challenges that she has had as a mother, and this was a reminder for delegates that we are all humans and the people we work with in pastoral care are all humans.

It was clear from the presentation that as professionals we do not know yet what challenges we will have to face in the future in supporting learners.
 

The conference was ended with the final presentation from Phil Jones the National Chair of NAPCE.

Phil has many years of experience in leadership roles in schools and as a school governor and now works as an educational consultant specialising in pastoral care, support for learners and leadership. 

The presentation explored the opportunities and challenges schools will face after the pandemic to engage children and young people in education.

Phil encouraged delegates to reflect on the need to rethink how education meets the needs of children and young people and supports them to achieve their full potential from their learning and prepare them for their future lives in society.

The pandemic has prevented children and young people from experiencing the learning opportunities and activities that support their socialisation.

Using evidence from recent research he suggested that schools will need to consider how to support young people in their personal development and to overcome barriers caused by poor mental health and well-being for some time after there is a return to something like normality following the pandemic.

The presentation highlighted how the experience of the pandemic could be seen as an opportunity to consider what is relevant in a learning experience for children and young people living in the 21st century and adapt policy and practice to meet their needs. 
 
To share any thoughts or ideas about the topics explored and the ideas shared in the conference please search #NapceCon21 on Twitter.
 

AWARDS: Finalists for the Second National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education Announced

The finalists of the second National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education have been revealed.

Deserving nominees have been selected in each of the eight categories by an independent panel of judges made up educational experts.

The standard of entry was extremely high this year once again, according to NAPCE Chair Phil jones, who sits on the Panel.

The Awards was launched by NAPCE in 2019 and is the first UK-wide scheme to recognise outstanding achievements across pastoral care in education settings.

A host of impressive organisations have lined up to support the National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education by sponsoring categories including Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), Blue Sky EducationThe Thrive Approach, Taylor and Francis , Inclusion Expert and Hult International Business School.

The event was created to shine a light on excellent practice in pastoral care and to celebrate the people making a real difference in the educational experience of young people.

It also encourages new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and recognises the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

Mr Jones said: “Once again we received a large range of fantastic entries for the National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education and the event is continuing to build spectacularly.

“Thank you once again to all of fantastic sponsors who returned to support the Awards again this year and to our newest supporters who came onboard for the first time.

“Huge congratulations to the finalists in each category, the standard of entry was sky high and getting to the finals is a great achievement in itself.

“Best of luck for the big presentation event later in the year, we will be revealing whether that will take place in person or online again soon.”

The Finalists

Pastoral School of The Year – Sponsored by Blue Sky Education

(A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school)

Royal School Dungannon, Dugannon, Northern Ireland

Oakfield School, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

School for Inspiring Talents, Newton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsored by The Thrive Approach

(A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with)

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston, Leicestershire

Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsored by Inclusion Expert

(A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success)

Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire

Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire

Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire

Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School, Basingstoke, Hampshire

Pastoral Leader Of The Year – Sponsored by Taylor and Francis 

(Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with)

Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community School, Belmont Durham

Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing

Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year – Sponsored by NAPCE

(A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people)

TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Programme

St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire – Positive Education Curriculum

Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire – Flourish Personal Development Programme

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester – The Thrive Programme

Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire – My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by NAPCE

(A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care)

Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire

Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire

AchieveNI, Belfast, Northern Ireland

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor The Hult International Business School

(An international school or organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care)

Bromsgrove International School, Thailand

Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern

Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness About Pastoral Care – Sponsored by Association of School and College Leaders

(An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people)

The results of this category will be announced at the Presentation Event later this year, details of this will be announced shortly.

There will be a prize of £100 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

SURVEY: Invitation to Take Part in Survey on Sexual Violence in Education

Invitation to Schools to Participate in an Important Survey on Sexual Violence in Education

Dr Kaitlyn Mendes and Dr Tanya Horeck made an important presentation at the NAPCE online July conference about combatting online sexual harassment and why we need RSE more than ever.

They are now inviting teachers in schools to contribute to their important research by completing a survey to develop a better understanding of sexual violence in schools.

This can be sent to any teacher to complete.

The survey won’t take more than 7 minutes to complete and will really help with the research.

Follow us on Twitter @napce1 where we’ll be sharing a link to the survey soon.

Dr Kaitlynn Mendes is Professor of Gender, Media and Sociology at the University of Leicester, UK. Tanya Horeck is an Associate Professor in Film, Media & Culture at Anglia Ruskin University in the UK.

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