Skip to Content

NAPCE News – December 2021

NAPCE News – December 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

CONFERENCE:  “NAPCE Partners with ASCL Pastoral Leaders Conference 2022”

NAPCE is delighted to be an official partner of the ASCL Conference for Pastoral Leaders 2022.

The theme for next year is ‘Keeping Children and Young People Safe – Tackling Harassment and Abuse”.

The Conference will be held across two dates in two locations, Manchester  (27th January, 2022) and London (9th February, 2022).

NAPCE Chair Phil Jones will be a special guest for a panel discussion at both events.

The Conference will also include guest speakers speaking on a range of safeguarding matters.

For more information and to book tickets follow these links:-

https://www.ascl.org.uk/pastoral_manchester

https://www.ascl.org.uk/pastoral_london

GOOD PRACTICE: Outstanding Pastoral Care Practice from NAPCE Awards “Pastoral Leader of the Year” Finalists

The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE were a opportunity to recognise the brilliant work that has been done in pastoral care.

It is a great opportunity to shine a light on the amazing efforts to support learners and the good practice that is taking place in schools across the UK and internationally.

NAPCE is proud to be able to highlight the excellent work that is being done in pastoral care in education through the 2021 awards.

This month it is the turn of the pastoral heroes who despite the challenges of the pandemic, through their work made a great contribution to the education and lives of children and young people in their care.

The Pastoral Leader of the Year award is sponsored by the publishers of NAPCE’s academic journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’, Taylor and Francis.

This award goes to the person who has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

The winner in 2021 was Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, at  St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London.  

Luke has been responsible for developing outstanding safeguarding and pastoral practice at St Benedict’s School and has introduced a range of initiatives that have promoted the safety and wellbeing of pupils.

This has included successful campaigns to tackle bullying, peer-on-peer abuse and mental health issues where Luke has made use of accurate data to identify, predict and effectively target problems.

Luke is also the Chair of a Safeguarding Advisory Panel that provides expert advice and is regularly invited to speak at safeguarding events and conferences.

His contribution to the development of effective safeguarding and pastoral practice has been truly outstanding.

The finalists for this award in 2021 were.
Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland.

Laura travelled to San Francisco to explore LGBTQ+ inclusion and has since given training to the pastoral team, pastoral leaders across the ALC and the school’s Board of Governors, with plans now in place to support these vulnerable learners in school.

During lockdown, she organised mental health presentations and has been in the school building every day to support parents and pupils.

She has completed Place2Be Mental Health training, neglect and suicide awareness training and led an ACES TeachMeet. She is member of Action Mental Health focus group, is the ALC representative for the Pastoral Steering group and is currently leading whole school Take5 status.

Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community SchoolBelmont Durham.

Helen was nominated for an unwavering commitment to the welfare of all children, particularly the disadvantaged.

She is passionate about improving the life chances of children through education and pastoral care.

She uses her moral purpose and relentless drive to secure the best for children and in doing so inspires others to go the extra mile.

This is best exemplified through the many acts of kindness she is responsible for, including mentoring and tutoring the most challenging children; personally organising and delivering food, reading books and work to vulnerable families during lockdown.

She is a leader who genuinely walks the talk, never asking anyone to do something she hasn’t already done herself.

Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester.

Micki leads a team who support children missing school due to mental health problems.

She introduced the Thrive programme to better identify wellbeing priorities for each child and then develop a bespoke package.

During lockdown she made weekly wellbeing calls, home visits and met a particularly anxious child at the Sure Start centre to help complete GCSE assessments.

She arranged Zoom meetings for parents on topics such as finance, housing, CAMHS and supporting study, recording sessions for those unable to attend on a You Tube channel.

She liaises with family support, health, social services and is a safeguarding lead.

Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Alison has formed, organised and lead a new team of professionals to provide outstanding nurture and therapy sessions and wellbeing initiatives, in a highly deprived primary school with an extremely vulnerable group of pupils.

Alison has tirelessly driven for improvements in the lives of children at school and at home and has developed feedback and pupil voice systems to ensure that children can be heard and that their needs are being met.

Over 25% of her cohort have now received quality provision around wellbeing and pastoral needs in 2020 – 2021 where in the previous year there was none.

The nominations for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education are now open.

To make a nomination in any of the categories please follow the link

https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

SAFER INTERNET DAY 2022: NAPCE Will Officially Support the Event in February Next Year

Safer Internet Day 2022

NAPCE is pleased to once again to be working with UK Safer Internet Centre and the charities, Childnet International, Internet Watch Foundation and South West Grid for Learning to plan and support Safer Internet Day 2022.

Phil Jones NAPCE National Chair was invited to attend the national planning meeting on Monday 6th December to help plan the 2022 event.

The 2022 event takes place on 8th February, and it will include a live broadcast to promote safe use of the internet from the top of the BT Tower in London.

The aim for 2022 is to inspire a national conversation about using technology, responsibly, respectfully, critically, and creatively to reach more young people than ever before. It will encourage young people to speak up and adults to engage and listen. The activities planned for Safer Internet Day 2022 will equip young people with the skills they need to interact safely and respectfully, while enjoying their online communities.

Educational materials have been developed and are available for free at the website https://saferinternet.org.uk/ in the age ranges 3-7, 7-11. 11-14 and 14-18.

They include ideas for assemblies, videos, quizzes, and lesson plans.

Resources are available for adults to share with children and young people at home and at school.

For more information about Safer internet Day 2022 follow the link-
Safer Internet Day 2022 – UK Safer Internet Centre

FROM THE CHAIR: A Festive Message from NAPCE Chair Phil Jones

As we approach the end of the term many colleagues working in pastoral roles in schools have shared with me that this has been one of the most demanding and exhausting terms in their careers.

Despite the arrival of a ‘new normal’ we are still in schools living in a very uncertain world where it is difficult to plan ahead and know what challenges we are likely to face in the future.

Schools have been at the frontline of the nation’s response to the pandemic dealing with daily demands to support children and young people and provide some stability for their local communities.

The impact of the experience of the pandemic is still not clear with the priority being to cope daily and provide learners with the best possible educational experience.

One headteacher said to me last week that we have realised that our students do not even remember how to walk around the building.

Schools are realising that well established routines and expectations have been eroded by the experience of the pandemic and schools are having to invest time in reinforcing their culture and ethos that enables a school to function effectively.

Much of this daily work is being done by staff in pastoral roles in schools.

When children and young people look for answers about what is happening in their world they look to the people in pastoral roles in schools and this is difficult when the uncertainty means that the adults do not have the answers.

We may not be clear about what problems and challenges will emerge from the experience of the pandemic, but we can be sure that staff in pastoral roles in schools will have an important role to play.

NAPCE is determined to continue to highlight the good practice and excellent work that is being done in pastoral care in education.

January is the month for renewing memberships of NAPCE and if you are not already a member, we hope that you will make it one of your new year resolutions to become a member of NAPCE and support our work in the best interest of all children and young people to support them in achieving their full potential from their education.

Membership of NAPCE comes with a subscription to our academic journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’, and this ensures that you are up to date with current research and ideas about pastoral care in education.

Once again in 2022 NAPCE will be celebrating the excellent work and good practice in pastoral care in education by organising the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

Please take a few minutes to make a nomination to ensure that your excellent work or the excellent work of your colleagues is recognised.

The new year will be the 40th anniversary year for NAPCE and special events and activities are planned to celebrate the occasion.

These include a Conference and Anniversary Dinner at Worcestershire County Cricket Ground in October.

Make sure you are following NAPCE on Twitter and other social media platforms for the latest news about events and plans for other activities.

I hope you have been following the NAPCE advent calendar on Twitter with our ideas about the reasons why pastoral care in education is important.

Please interact with us on Twitter and let us know if you agree with our thoughts or whether you have got ideas that you would like to share about how effective pastoral care in education can make a real difference.

I would like to take the opportunity to thank everybody who has supported and contributed to the work of NAPCE in 2021.

A big thank you to everybody who attended and contributed to the online conference, wrote articles for the newsletter or journal, made nominations for the Awards and shared ideas about pastoral care.

Together you are all making a positive impact on the learning and lives of children and young people.

A special thank you to the members of the NAPCE National Executive and Editorial Board for your inspired ideas and determination to make a difference.

A very happy Christmas to everybody and my best wishes for a safe and fulfilling new year.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

MEMBERSHIP: Renewals for NAPCE 2022 Membership Are Being Sent Out

2022 Membership Renewals – NAPCE

Invitations are being sent out to NAPCE members to renew your membership for 2022.

Next year it will be 40 years since the National Association for Pastoral Care was formed and the academic journal Pastoral Care in Education was published.

Special events including a weekend conference and Anniversary Dinner are planned to celebrate the 40 years that NAPCE has been supporting education.

Members will have priority for bookings so to make sure that you are fully involved in the Association’s special year renew your membership early and get the full benefits of being a member of NAPCE.

If you have shown your interest in the work of NAPCE by registering for the newsletter or following NAPCE on social media, then now is the time to become a member in time for the anniversary year.

The National Executive have made the decision to NOT INCREASE THE PRICE OF MEMBERSHIP for 2022 and full membership includes a subscription for four copies of the academic journal to be delivered to your home address.

Taylor and Francis publishers manage the membership subscriptions on behalf of NAPCE and their contact details are T&F Customer Services, Sheepen Place, Colchester, CO3 3LP, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7017 5543 . Fax: +44 (0) 20 7017 5198 . Email: societies@tandf.co.uk. Contact Taylor and Francis to find out about the different ways that you can pay your subscription.

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP –  Individual and Group memberships include a subscription to Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PCE) Published by Routledge

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP including one copy of PCE Individual Subscription Rate £44 US$88 €57 NQT/Retired/Student Individual Rate £21 US$40 €33

GROUP MEMBERSHIP including two copies of PCE Group Subscription rate £66 US$132 €86 Primary/Special School Rate £43

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP society membership only – does not include PCE subscription. Associate Subscription rate £10 US$16 €30

Follow this link to apply for membership RPED_NAPCEmembership-New.pdf (netdna-ssl.com) or go to Apply Online – NAPCE to apply for membership online.

ARTICLE: Safeguarding Supervision in Schools – The Need and the Purpose by Carle Elder

Safeguarding Supervision in Schools – The Need to and the Purpose

Supervision – The Need

Education is a universal service. Therefore, it is inevitably serving some children and families with complex needs.

The idea that any child is exposed to abuse or trauma is abhorrent. Rightly, safeguarding is elevated and prioritised in order to protect children by seeking to reduce the incidence of these episodes and to provide emotional support to children and families in the unfortunate circumstances where they have occurred. Sadly, traumatic events are a part of life so there will always be a need for mechanisms to support people in the midst of them.

There is tremendous pressure on schools in the UK to have, as part of their safeguarding functions, a well-developed provision that compensates for some of the reductions in public resources that we have seen over the past few years.During my time as a school and trust leader I noticed that as schools became ever more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their safeguarding practices, the expectations around their depth of involvement in safeguarding matters was matched only by the increase in the sheer volume of cases they uncovered and were working on.

It was my privilege to be the Principal of an academy and then Director of Education for the same trust that largely operated in city settings in the east midlands. Unfortunately, these communities had a greater than national average incidence of deprivation and, although I have no data to confirm the connection, a similarly high level of incidence of safeguarding concerns.

These experiences of made two things clear to me:

• There seems to be a growth in the pressure, demands on schools and their safeguarding staff alongside an increase in the volume and complexity of the safeguarding issues they are facing
• The emotional toll of working closely on complex safeguarding cases is often enormous and it is essential to have a robust and effective support system for those staff involved.This leads me on to two important questions:

• How can we keep improving our safeguarding practices?
• Who supports those supporting the most vulnerable children?My own experience combined with further reading, wider research and engaging with professional learning (such as the NSPCC Supervision Skills training) has led me to the realisation that supervision for our safeguarding staff and leaders is the answer to both of these questions.

Supervision – The Purpose

Tony Morrison, regarded as an leading expert in this field for over 30 years, proposed a model for supervision that can be applied just as successfully in schools as in the social care settings it was initially based in. Often described as the 4x4x4 Model of Supervision, it connects the four functions of supervision with the four beneficiaries via the four elements of an adult learning cycle (Kolb, 1988).

Two of the four functions stated in this model of supervision are ‘development’ and ‘support’. Clearly, these directly address and resolve the questions posed earlier:

• The Development Function: Supervision, when done well within a model and framework, ensures the continuing professional development of those involved in safeguarding. It enables these staff to improve the knowledge, skills and competence to safeguard children.
• The Support Function: Supervision enables those staff directly involved in complex safeguarding cases to safely process their emotional response to this work. There are obvious benefits to them of being able to offload but the consequences of this help the other key stakeholders too. These staff are less likely to be burnt out; are more able to be effective and can therefore better serve the children, families and school. Also, it is reassuring to know that having invested in the knowledge and skills of these staff, the support function will impact on their ongoing motivation and capacity to do the role and have positive impacts on staff retention.Additional Functions of Supervision:

• The Mediation Function: Develops in the safeguarding staff a deeper understanding of how their role and work contributes to the overall aims of the school and organisation.
• The Managerial Function: Clarifies and reinforces the expectations of the safeguarding staff. It is essential that those working in safeguarding know what is expected of them, how they are expected to perform these tasks (procedurally and attitudinally) and also when they need to do them by.These functions have connections to the policies and practices in schools and trusts. Supervision creates the space for professional dialogue and discussion to ensure these are better than fit-for-purpose and optimised. Additionally, supervision complements some of the aims of existing performance management processes in clarifying expectations and reflecting on how well actions align with the framework of policy.

In conclusion, supervision of our safeguarding staff enables that key element of our work to be done more successfully for all concerned.

There is clarity on how this aspect of our work fits within the wider school and community context (mediation function); everyone involved knows exactly what is expected of them and how they are expected to do it (managerial function); the staff performing this work are developed and the benefit of this learning and experience is shared across the staff peer group and network (the development function) and everybody involved contributes to and is supported by a culture that promotes their wellbeing and emotional health (the support function).

It bears further repetition, Safeguarding Supervision helps us safeguard our children better.

Further reading:

Department for Education (2015, updated December 2020) Working Together to Safeguard Children: A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Available at Working together to safeguard children – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) (accessed October 2021)

Department for Education (2015, updated September 2021) Keeping Children Safe in Education: Statutory Guidance for schools and colleges. Available at Keeping children safe in education – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) (accessed October 2021)

Kolb DA (1988) Experiential Learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. London: Pearson Education

Morrison T (2005) Staff Supervision in Social Care (3rdEdition). Brighton: Pavilion Publishing & Media

Sturt P & Rowe J (2018) Using Supervision in Schools: A guide to building safe cultures and providing emotional support in a range of school settings. Brighton: Pavilion Publishing & Media

About the Author (Carle Elder):

Carl has been involved in teaching and school leadership, often serving challenging communities, for over 15 years with the notable achievement of leading a previously failing school in Nottingham to sustained and significant improvement. Carl has witnessed first-hand the incredible impact that improving schools by improving leadership undoubtedly has; a profound impact on the children and also the community as a whole.

Carl has a sound knowledge of the education sector, a track record of successful leadership, and a genuine interest in self-development regarding leadership theory and practice. Carl is now a full time Educational Consultant and Coach who has also completed the NSPCC Supervision Skills in Child Protection programme and offers supervision to school staff through Leadership Edge – Coaching in Schools.

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 is Now Open

We are delighted to launch the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards will be in the 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – November 2021

NAPCE News – November 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  “Student Voice and Care During Covid-19” by NAPCE NEC Member Luke Myer

Student voice and care during COVID-19 by Luke Myer

It’s clear that the pandemic has highlighted and exacerbated inequalities in education. But, in many ways, it has also brought educational communities closer together – reducing attainment gaps and putting learners and staff in a shared, albeit unprecedented, situation. Care has never been so important.

The latest special issue of NAPCE’s Pastoral Care in Education explored the importance of care in the time of COVID-19; it hopped around the globe, with case studies from New Zealand to Guatemala. It studied every level of education – from a feminist view of pastoral care for young children in Spain to the experiences of disabled students in UK universities. One contribution, from an Indigenous Moana/Pacific perspective, explored the idea of ‘teu le vā’, or nurturing the relational space between people, and what that looks like during the pandemic – the ‘digital va/vā’.[1] At its core, care is about understanding the needs of others and helping meet them. The most important voices in pastoral care, therefore, are those of learners themselves. Pastoral care at its most effective offers learners space to talk; this is as true in early years as it is with postgraduate students.

Student voice has increasingly become established in school life; it’s difficult to visit a primary or secondary school without seeing a display board celebrating a student council or prefect system. In higher education, ‘student engagement’ is a core feature, embedded in the UK Quality Code.[2] It’s a legal requirement for UK universities to have independent, democratic students’ unions, enshrined in the 1994 Education Act. Empowering students to speak and involving them in decision-making brings shared benefits in terms of better academic outcomes and continuous improvement of pedagogy. But it also brings benefits for students themselves – increased resilience, sense of belonging, civic participation, and trust.[3],[4] The Anna Freud Centre reports that schools with a strong commitment to student voice see better behaviour, reductions in exclusions, and improved attainment.

However, in the pandemic, opportunities for student voice have been limited. With online learning, disruptive lockdowns, and frequent pupil self-isolations, teachers have struggled to deliver learning at its most basic.

“We’ve had a huge influx in pupils losing social skills, being anxious around others, and struggling to stay in lesson,” one secondary teacher in Cheshire told me. “We have so many kids now on half timetables to help deal with it.”

A similar view was shared by a head of department at a north London secondary school.

“On top of poor social skills from missing so much school, we had a flood of problems when students returned – things that had gone on at home or on social media. It was exhausting. We weren’t expecting it, nor were we provided with the resources to deal with it effectively.”

2021 UNESCO survey of secondary teachers across Europe, the Middle East and North Africa found that during the pandemic, ‘the vast majority of young people, regardless of whether they live in Europe or MENA, lost out on opportunities to have their voice heard’. So, what does student voice look like in the ‘digital va/vā’? Can it be delivered? And how does it impact on pastoral care?

“The reliance on digital technology has gone up,” the head of department tells me. “But this is a good thing because I can easily communicate and share with my groups. There are still boundary issues to resolve, for example if I get an email on a Sunday night from a student. But I think the emergence of tools like Google Classrooms has been really good.”

In the initial lockdown in spring 2020, case studies published by the QAA showed universities like Robert Gordon and Harper Adams had been carrying out online pulse surveys of students’ experiences in online learning environments. Robert Gordon University’s Enhancement of Learning, Teaching and Access department (DELTA) gathered feedback which identified technological and social barriers to learning. These were then included in students’ extenuating circumstances, and a programme of free online industry-focused short courses were developed to address skills needs.

In Liverpool, mass online feedback from secondary school students during the pandemic has begun informing new mental health strategies. Eighty-five local schools took part in the 2021 OxWell Student Survey, an annual online study that asks students aged 9-18 about wellbeing and mental health. Over 11,600 young people across the city took part, sharing thoughts on their wellbeing at school during the pandemic. Liverpool City Council’s Education, Employment & Skills team have begun using the feedback to work with schools on new programmes like Forest Schools and peer-to-peer playground support. The exercise will result in close collaboration between schools, including joint training to tackle children’s low-level mental health needs.

These surveys show how the insights of learners can bring an invaluable perspective, shaping what we do when it comes to pastoral care. But student voice can go deeper than this too. The language in the Quality Code I mentioned earlier reads:

The provider actively engages students, individually and collectively, in the quality of their educational experience.

In practice, this means that meaningful student voice systems allow students to shape their education in partnership with staff. They can do so ‘collectively’, in spaces where they can consider, deliberate and develop their own informed views together. They can also do so ‘individually’ – with staff differentiating their teaching and learning based on the student’s own views. Learning is, after all, a two-way street – it’s not simply done ‘to’ students, but with the effort they put in too. So, when students have the opportunity to actively shape their learning, schools create a partnership model which can drive high-quality education.

The advance of technology in education can help. UNESCO’s Europe-MENA survey found that after the pandemic, 87% of teachers were using social media to stay connected with students.[5] They also reported a 19% increase in teachers using digital student voice methods, with 54% doing so in “most” or “all” lessons.

The case studies cited range from student-led films about pupil experiences in Greece and Tunisia, to interactive online seminars with leading community members in Romania. In the Greek example, school pupils used social media groups and online meetings to share their feelings about learning from home. This was coupled with lessons on film-making skills, and the end result was a collaborative video project which received international recognition.

In the UK, most universities involved student representatives directly in their COVID planning; examples range from the Highlands and Islands Students’ Association to Cardiff Metropolitan University. Students’ union elected officers typically attended university committees by Zoom, including strategic and operational decision-making meetings. Many held daily or weekly Student Voice sessions to collate student concerns from social media and email, and identify patterns to feed back to the university. The University of Bath students’ union created a Facebook ‘Corona Community’ with nearly 4000+ students, and coupled it with Microsoft Teams sites for communicating with specific groups, for example international students. The union was able to capture detailed data on students’ engagement with online learning.

The north London school has used Google Classrooms to develop pupil-driven PSHE. “My school have started doing ‘MyZone’,” the department head told me. “It’s an hour a week dedicated to student-led discussion of social issues like mental health and digital communication skills. The students have shaped what we do – we talk about the things that they want to discuss, and giving them that control means they turn up and engage.”

A similar initiative was introduced in the Cheshire school. “Every Wednesday, period one, we have a ‘Spirit’ hour,” explained the teacher. “It’s based on the PSHE curriculum, but through lockdown we adapted it based on what kids were asking to give them an insight into the NHS, infections, and so on.”

A whole-school approach to pastoral care means listening to everyone’s voices, and learners themselves are as important as anyone. When schools involve them in their decision-making, it drives positive change and improved outcomes, as well as individual empowerment and confidence-building. It takes effort – it’s not a one-off exercise, but a continuous cycle of improvement. It takes time to bed in, and to ensure that it’s inclusive of all students rather than the ones most likely to get involved. But it’s worth it.

The pandemic has been a painful, disruptive time for education, but it can also be an opportunity for change. If schools embrace digital tools for student voice, they can show students that their views are valued, that it is safe to share, and that they will be heard. In turn, we’ll all benefit – in school and in wider society.

Luke Myer
National Executive Committee
NAPCE


[1] Baice, T., Fonua, S.M., Levy, B., Allen, J.M. and Wright, T. (2021). How do you (demonstrate) care in an institution that does not define “care”?. Pastoral Care in Education, 39(3), pp.250–268.
[2] Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) (2018) UK Quality Code for Higher Education. Gloucester: QAA.
[3] Lyndon, H. (2020) ‘Listening to Children’ in Williams- Brown, Z. and Mander, S.Eds. ‘Childhood Well-being and Resilience: influences on educational outcomes’. Abingdon: Routledge.
[4] Fielding, M. (2004) “New Wave” Student Voice and the Renewal of Civic Society. London Review of Education, 2, 197-217.
[5] UNESCO (2021) The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on student voice: Findings and recommendations. Paris: UNESCO. p.18

GOOD PRACTICE: Outstanding Pastoral Care Practice from NAPCE Awards “Team of the Year” Finalists

The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE were a opportunity to recognise the brilliant work that has been done in pastoral care.

It is a great opportunity to shine a light on the amazing efforts to support learners and the good practice that is taking place in schools across the UK and internationally.

This month we focus on the category for the Pastoral Team of the Year which is sponsored by the Thrive Approach to share some good practice from the finalists and winner.

This award goes to a team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

The Winners of this award in 2021 were All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire. 

The pastoral team have worked tirelessly to help provide an education for some of our most vulnerable children.

From visiting children during lockdown, to providing a provision that starts as soon as the children get into school and finishes when they leave.

The team have sourced breakfasts for the entire school, offer bespoke behaviour interventions throughout the day and also support our families when in need.

The pastoral team also offer support for the rest of our colleagues, supplying training, advice and interventions when needed.

We are about to go the entire school year with zero fixed-term or permanent exclusions, something the school has never achieved before. This is down to our fantastic pastoral team.

The finalists for this category shared this excellent practice with the judges.

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

The team supports the wellbeing of our autistic pupils across the school and beyond within the borough.

They lead on initiatives such as PBS and developing valuable life skills including social skills and independence.

Their work focuses on helping our autistic learners to understand their emotions and regulate themselves appropriately.

The team works with families through home visits and family support to ensure the work in school is continued at home.

Success through lockdown was a 96% engagement from families and in school through negative incidents decreasing dramatically and positive records increasing by over 200%.
.
Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland.

Team = Vice Principal, SENCO, 2 Heads of Key Stage and 6 Heads of Year. Team members have attended training in mental health first aid, suicide prevention, ACEs and neglect.

Focus on restorative practice, building relationships and engaging with parents. Surveys used during lockdown to identify pupils struggling and all received phone calls/virtual meetings.

Delivery of personal development programmes with a focus on 5 Ways to Wellbeing and core values. Every external agency meeting is attended. Provision of safe spaces and bespoke support packages.

Team focus on pupil voice which is a School Development Plan priority. RESTORE programme after lockdown.

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire.

Nidderdale High School Pastoral Team are nominated for their strength and togetherness and for the support they continually offer to every young person in the school, their families and carers.

They have a reputation for resolving complex and difficult cases, often using the environment of the Nidderdale countryside to find bespoke ways of working whilst additionally promoting good mental health and wellbeing.

The Pastoral Team has ensured that every young person felt supported, listened to and noticed throughout the periods of closure and uncertainty.

They have remained contactable, approachable, inclusive and strong, promoting a constant culture of kindness and care.

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire.

The pastoral team at BCS put our children at the heart of everything they do. Well-being, emotional health, safety, friendships, parental support and supporting children with SEND.

They’ve worked tirelessly through COVID and are now helping children get back into normal routines. School is a safer, happier and more nurturing place because of this team of absolute heroes.

They’re amazing and our students, staff and parents are lucky to have these people in their lives. Thank you.

Have a look at this link to see how our finalists celebrated as the winners were announced at the Presentation Ceremony.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1441318847152230402

The 2022 National Awards for pastoral care are about to be launched and to find out how you can make nominations to recognise good practice in pastoral care in education follow NAPCE on Twitter @NAPCE1 and look out for details in future editions of the NAPCE newsletter and on the website www.napce.org.uk

ANTI-BULLYING WEEK: A New Book by NAPCE Editorial Board Member Helen Cowie Raises Awareness of Bullying

Anti-bullying week 2021 – A School For Everyone: Stories and Lesson Plans to Teach Inclusivity and Social Issues

Anti-bullying Week, coordinated by the Anti-Bullying Alliance, is an annual event empowering everyone to unite against bullying. “One Kind Word,” the theme of Anti-Bullying Week 2021, which runs from 15th – 19th November, focuses on how little acts of kindness can make a huge impact and how we should all respect each other’s differences.

“A SCHOOL FOR EVERYONE: Stories and Lesson Plans to Teach Inclusivity and Social Issues” is a research-informed empathy-building discussion tool for educators that shares this anti-bullying message, encouraging respect for individuality and showing young people how they can make a difference.

By increasing knowledge and understanding of a wide range of social and emotional issues, the book promotes acceptance and celebration of diversity in the school environment so that all classmates feel valued and included.

The compendium provides 16 stories told from the different perspectives of individual children from one class over the course of three terms.

Each chapter opens with discussions about tricky topics including gender diversity, bereavement, disability, body image, frenemies, cyber-bullying, parental divorce, living in poverty, and climate change, to help children develop empathy for their peers.

Shared reading of a story gives each child insight into the inner thoughts of a character who is experiencing distressing emotions.

Alongside classmates who are facing these difficult issues, we also meet Jakub who is from Poland, Molly who is not a stereotypical girl, Oliver who is on the autism spectrum, Jamie whose dad is in prison, Hind who is a refugee, Margaret who is from a gypsy family, and Michael who learns about important Black Britons. By reading their stories, young people start to imagine what it feels like to be one of them.

For each issue raised, the story is followed by a fact file, a set of interactive activities, lesson plans and a bank of resources to further enhance understanding and promote empathy.

Research suggests that interacting with peers and guiding children’s learning can help children learn more than working on their own.

The activities are designed for children to work together to support their learning. In the group setting, minds meet and beliefs can be discussed within a supportive environment.

Bystanders can reflect on the positive impact of just one kind word. Marginalised children can gain hope that there are solutions to difficult situations. Children who bully can see the effect of negative behaviour on the character in the story.

There are several characteristics typical of children exhibiting bullying behaviours – and a lack of empathy for the distress that their actions cause is a key characteristic. One way to increase empathy is through real or “imagined” contact. Research studies have found that when people from different groups make contact with each other, prejudice is reduced and relations are improved.

However, there are two ways in which this contact is difficult.

First, reduction of prejudice can only work when there is an opportunity for contact. Some schools may have low levels of diversity so that children do not have the opportunity to interact with people who are different from themselves. Second, sometimes people become anxious about interacting with someone who is different from themselves, preventing contact from reducing prejudice.

This is another reason why the concept of imaginary contact becomes so important. Imagined contact can reduce children’s future anxiety about meeting people different from themselves.

Reading stories about people who are different and leading children to imagine interacting with them – imaginary contact – can be a powerful force for change.

Researchers have found that imagining an intergroup interaction can have many of the same effects as actually participating in intergroup contact.

The first-person stories and activities in “A School for Everyone” aim to create contact, leading to more compassionate and inclusive classrooms, where diversity is celebrated. Just as one kind word can lead to another, our hope is that “A School for Everyone” can make a difference.

https://uk.jkp.com/products/a-school-for-everyone

Helen Cowie
Editorial Board Member
NAPCE

MEMBERSHIP: Renewals for NAPCE 2022 Membership Are Being Sent Out

2022 Membership Renewals – NAPCE

Invitations are being sent out to NAPCE members to renew your membership for 2022.

Next year it will be 40 years since the National Association for Pastoral Care was formed and the academic journal Pastoral Care in Education was published.

Special events including a weekend conference and Anniversary Dinner are planned to celebrate the 40 years that NAPCE has been supporting education.

Members will have priority for bookings so to make sure that you are fully involved in the Association’s special year renew your membership early and get the full benefits of being a member of NAPCE.

If you have shown your interest in the work of NAPCE by registering for the newsletter or following NAPCE on social media, then now is the time to become a member in time for the anniversary year.

The National Executive have made the decision to NOT INCREASE THE PRICE OF MEMBERSHIP for 2022 and full membership includes a subscription for four copies of the academic journal to be delivered to your home address.

Taylor and Francis publishers manage the membership subscriptions on behalf of NAPCE and their contact details are T&F Customer Services, Sheepen Place, Colchester, CO3 3LP, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7017 5543 . Fax: +44 (0) 20 7017 5198 . Email: societies@tandf.co.uk. Contact Taylor and Francis to find out about the different ways that you can pay your subscription.

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP –  Individual and Group memberships include a subscription to Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PCE) Published by Routledge

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP including one copy of PCE Individual Subscription Rate £44 US$88 €57 NQT/Retired/Student Individual Rate £21 US$40 €33

GROUP MEMBERSHIP including two copies of PCE Group Subscription rate £66 US$132 €86 Primary/Special School Rate £43

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP society membership only – does not include PCE subscription. Associate Subscription rate £10 US$16 €30

Follow this link to apply for membership RPED_NAPCEmembership-New.pdf (netdna-ssl.com) or go to Apply Online – NAPCE to apply for membership online.

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 is Now Open

We are delighted to launch the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards will be in the 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – October 2021

NAPCE News – October 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  NAPCE NEC Member & Pastoral Care Leader Connor Acton Explores the Importance of Parent/Carer Communication

Parent/carer communication is easy to get right, painful when you get it wrong and downright disastrous if it goes really wrong.

It’s sometimes easy to forget that when we speak to parents, or communicate via other means, that the person on the other end of the line is also a living, breathing human with their own worries and concerns as well as their own day job or personal life to manage.

It’s also easy to forget how you desire to be spoken to when you are ringing a parent, late on a Friday, after a long day at work.

You want to get your point across, tell the parent what their child has done wrong, alongside any sanction, and get out of there as quickly as possible.

Unfortunately, in doing so, you set yourself up to fail and the building blocks for a poor parental relationship begin to stack on top of each other.

You’ll soon realise that once the blocks have started to stack, each conversation you have results in them stacking faster, to the point you dread ringing them at all because you know how the conversation will go.

In reality there really aren’t many occasions where a parental phone call should be challenging – a difficult conversation may need to be had but that doesn’t mean that it needs to be one which results in either party leaving it and feeling like they’ve done twelve rounds with Mike Tyson.

As a Pastoral Leader I can’t begin to think of how many phone calls I’ve made during my career, more than some call centres I’m sure, and I certainly can’t begin to imagine all of the many reasons for doing so.

That being said there have been some incredibly difficult conversations to be had; there have been times I have had to recommend we end a conversation and pick it up later; times when the 5-minute phone call becomes 30mins-1hr of trying to resolve a multitude of issues; times when I’ve hung up and had to call social services or the police.

You never know where a phone call home, or a chat on the gate, or any other method of communication might take you.

You should know, however, that there are some really simple things you can do to make sure that parental communication/relationships needn’t be painful.

Parental communication, and by extension co-operation, is one of the biggest keys to your success as a mentor, TA, Teacher, Pastoral Leader etc.

Most parents will want to work with you to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be – almost all parents will want to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be but may not want to work with you!

Courtesy and respect go a long way in building strong working relationships with parents – the vast majority of your communications with parents will likely be by phone.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve sat with a member of staff who starts a phone call to a parent with “Hello, it’s Mr X from school, John was a nightmare in his DT lesson today”.

Those kinds of opening messages get most parent’s backs up straight away. Introduce yourself, start by asking them if they are alright, if they have a couple of minutes to talk and you’ll often find they are much more willing to engage with you.

That’s not always the case but if you’ve taken the time to be respectful at the start of the conversation you will have at least set the table for a polite conversation.

Think about how you feel when the insurance salesman rings at 4pm, after a long day, and asks you if you’ve got some time to talk – I’m certainly not comparing us to cold callers but for some parents the feeling is the same!

Try and ensure that your first communication with a parent isn’t a negative one wherever possible – when we take over a class/group, or first start working with a child, we generally know where we might expect problems.

Get early conversations in with their parents by spotting praise where possible within the first few interactions you have with their child – this will make it easier for you to call later on if you need to ring for less positive reasons.

There are a huge number of parents who dread seeing the school number on their phone – how many times have you had a parent/carer answer with “What’s she done now?”.

For some of our communities the thought of a telling off from school brings back negative memories of their own and this is always something to be cognizant of.

Even if you can’t see any opportunities for praise you can still call and introduce yourself in situations where you feel it may be beneficial – if you take over a class, for example, that you know have been historically poorly behaved there’s no harm in ringing some parents of key students to introduce yourself, acknowledge the issues from the past and then let them know you are going to be working to move things forward.

You may even find that a parent/carer has suggestions/advice to offer that could be valuable for you, having never worked with their child before.

Praise phone calls, postcards, emails etc. will always be a great way to endear yourself to most parents/carers and you should endeavour to do this as much as you reasonably can.

I’ve always been a fan of the ‘Friday Five’ approach – making five positive phonecalls on a Friday – to end the week on a high and make five children’s (and their parent’s) weekends.

Keep any reporting of behaviour as factual and clear as possible and, if you need to, think beforehand about the message you wish to convey.

It can be hard for a parent to hear a statement like “Harry was incredibly rude, and his language was disgusting in the lesson” – you are much better off keeping it to what actually happened “Harry came into the classroom today and when I asked him to take off his coat, he told me to shut up” is harder hitting, much more accurate and also makes it sound less like it’s your opinion.

When you report any sanctions you gave you may also want to link it clearly to the school’s behaviour policy – “I had no choice but to have him removed in line with the school’s behaviour policy and he then lost his breaktime as a result” – this takes away some of the feeling that you are directly responsible for the sanction, and thus the person to direct any negative energy towards.

If the time is right you can then start to talk about how to move forward, what your expectations for the student are and what the next lesson or interaction with them might look like.

That is the ultimate goal – how can you improve the situation moving forward.

Always try to be aware of the time of day and the time your conversation may take – if you know you need to have a long chat with a parent don’t just call and expect them to drop everything for you – there’s nothing wrong with letting them know this could be a longer conversation and asking if there’s a more convenient time for them.

Equally, in reverse, you aren’t obligated to take a call that sucks up all of your precious time and you need to be willing to do the same thing for yourself.

The more you get to know certain parents, the more you will know their working patterns and their ability to talk with you.

Share this information with other staff if you develop it so that they can also benefit from what you’ve found.

Some parents will prefer email communication due to their availability and if this works for you it can be a really powerful way to address concerns that also removes some of the emotion brought by a phonecall – all I would say is to treat it as you would an internal email – keep it professional and respond within your working hours.

It’s also important to make sure that you are aware of who you are calling, and their relationship to the child, and make every effort possible to use the parent/carer’s name.

A pet hate of mine is “Is this Abby’s mum?” – you should be using their title and surname as standard – as part of your introduction confirm who they are, even if it’s the seventeenth time you’ve spoken to them it sets the standard, “Hi, is that Mrs Smith? Ah great, it’s Mr Acton calling from X – how are you? Have you got a few minutes to talk?” and also ensures you are speaking to the right person from a safeguarding perspective.

Be confident in ending a call if it does become problematic – there are some parents/carers who just won’t countenance what you have to say – this may also stretch to abusive language or threats.

This can be for any number of reasons but ultimately you do not come to work to be verbally abused.

If you can feel a conversation is getting heated, then you are probably best to draw it to a close with a more definite statement “I’m hopeful that we can work together to achieve the best for XYZ but I think it’s best if we pick this up again at a later date. Either I, or XYZ, will give you a call back in the next X days – thank you for your time”.

You can then decide if you need to escalate the conversation up the chain and get a more senior member of staff to call to resolve the issue, or whether some breathing room and time to digest the issue will mean you can have the conversation yourself at a later date.

It’s always worth flagging this as an issue to your line manager or SLT as you may not be the only member of staff being put in this situation.

For some staff, communication home is something that brings anxiety and fear – this shouldn’t be the case.

I can count on one hand the number of phone calls home that I’ve made where I’ve ended the call feeling like it was unpleasant.

If you stick to some of the tried and tested approaches discussed here you should be able to develop a script and a methodology for communication that ensures that you always start off on the right foot and, when you don’t, you know how to bring it to a conclusion.

As with anything – the more you do the easier it becomes – for the past however many years I have started every phone call the exact same way (introduction, how are you, have you got time to talk?) and I doubt I’ll ever change that now.

One final tip is to ask a member of staff who you know is regularly in touch with parents if you can shadow them making a couple of difficult calls, particularly to those you may have struggled with, and you’ll soon see that it’s a skill to be honed.

Having parents on your side is one of the greatest tools to have in your toolkit – the knowledge that you and their parents are working in sync is one that strikes fear into the hearts of many a troublemaker and can inspire many students to show their best self.

In a post-covid world I am finding that parents are desperate to communicate and want to find out more about their children than ever – it’s an opportunity to be capitalised on.

Connor Acton
NEC Member
NAPCE

AWARDS: A Report & List of Winners from NAPCE Awards 2021

The winners of the second annual National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education were unveiled at an online ceremony on September 23rd.

More entries than before, very deserving winners and fantastic support from across the education sector characterised NAPCE Awards 2021.

The online event was hosted by former teacher, current marketing expert and NAPCE NEC member Victoria Bownes.

Guests heard a compelling and inspiring ket note speech from Inclusion Expert’s Daniel Sobel, NAPCE Chair Phil Jones also addresses delegates.

Here are the winners and finalists of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021.

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsored by BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland

Royal School Dungannon, Dugannon, Northern Ireland

Oakfield School, Hull

The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester

School for Inspiring Talents, Newton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsored by The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsored by Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire

Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire,

Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire

Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsored by Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London

Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community School, Belmont Durham,

Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year –  Sponsored by NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire,Flourish Personal Development Programme

Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor,TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program

St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme

Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshir

Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull

Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Bromsgrove International School, Thailand

Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern

Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

Stephen Lane, author of ‘Beyond Wiping Noses

 

AWARDS: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones Shares Speech from NAPCE Awards 2021

It is a great pleasure as National Chair of the Association to welcome you to the ceremony for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE.

Once again, this year it is an online event, and it is a pity that we cannot be in the same room to congratulate our winners and finalists.

It does mean that we can be joined tonight by people form all corners of the United Kingdom and indeed from around the world.

It is true to say that the 2020 – 2021 academic year was a difficult and challenging year for education.

It is remarkable how well children and young people have been supported through this period.

Schools have been challenged to find new ways of working and coping with the demands of the latest risk assessment.

Everybody who has worked in pastoral roles and supported learners are heroes in this academic year for the support you have provided and the difference you have made in the learning experience and lives of children and young people.

The nominations for the awards show the brilliant work that is taking place to support learners and all our finalists are an inspiration to all of us and fully deserve the recognition and respect that comes with being nominated.

The experience of the pandemic has raised awareness about the important role education has in supporting the socialisation and well-being of children and young people.

The pastoral work in schools, colleges and higher education often takes place without being noticed and valued but it makes a huge contribution in developing children and young people into positive and well-adjusted members of society.

The pandemic experience has encouraged researchers, writers, and practitioners to revisit what is the purpose of education with greater value being placed on the personal development of children and young people as human beings.

This contribution to a person’s education is important to enable them to make a positive contribution to society and live fulfilled lives.

It is the whole school experience that is important where children and young people learn not just form the content of lessons but also from the interaction with other people, the relationships they build and the experiences they have.

Schools and learning will be different after the pandemic with increasing use of technology for example for virtual parents’ evenings and online learning, but we must not forget that what is important in education is supporting and developing the children and young people in our care and preparing them for successful lives in the future.

It is important as we move towards normal or at least a new normal that we do not lose the value placed on supporting the personal development and well-being of learners that has emerged as being so important following our experience of the pandemic.

One of the best ways to do that is by becoming a member of NAPCE.

I am pleased to say that despite the restrictions of the pandemic the membership of NAPCE has increased.

This highlights the growing interest in supporting children and young people to achieve their full potential.

A special welcome to our new members this evening who may be attending a NAPCE event for the first time.

We look forward to meeting you in person soon and sharing our interest in supporting learners to be successful in their education and to prepare them for their future lives.

If you are not yet a member and you are interested in the care and support of learners, why not keep in contact with our work by visiting the NAPCE website or by contacting NAPCE admin to be added to the circulation list for the free monthly newsletter. We hope that you will follow and support NAPCE’s work by following on Twitter and other social media platforms.

2022 will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE. A number of activities and events are planned to celebrate the 40 years that academics, researchers, writers and practitioners have been working together to promote the importance of care and support as important parts of a person’s educational experience.

These include the publication of a new book about pastoral care edited by NAPCE, special editions of our academic journal and a live conference where we will meet in person to share ideas and good practice, and of course do not forget the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

We are nearly ready for me to hand back to Victoria our host for the evening for the announcement of the winners in each category.

Before I do that, please can I thank everybody who took the time to make a nomination to recognise the excellent good practice taking place in the pastoral care and support of learners.

Please can I thank our sponsors for your support for the 2021 awards, Blue Sky Education, Taylor & Francis, Inclusion Expert, The Association of School and College Leaders, Hult International Business School and The Thrive Approach.

Your support for the education of children and young people by supporting these awards is really appreciated.

Please can I thank our judges, Emeritus Professor Stan Tucker, Emeritus Professor Richard Pring, Associate Professor Anne Emerson and Doctor Noel Purdy for your time and careful consideration of the nominations.

Finally, a huge thank you from NAPCE to everybody who works in pastoral roles or contributes to the development of pastoral care theory and practice for the difference you make every day in the learning experience and future lives of learners.

Enjoy the evening, congratulations to all the finalists and thank you for your support for NAPCE.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

GOOD PRACTICE: Winner of “Best School” at NAPCE Awards 2021 Shares Good Practice Examples

It was a pleasure to celebrate the achievements of winners and finalists highlighted at the National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education 2021 at the presentation event on 23rd September which took place online.

The evening was hosted by NAPCE’s Victoria Bownes and the welcome was given by our National Chair, Phil Jones and the guest presentation by author Daniel Sobel.

It was inspiring to listen to all the good practice that is taking place in pastoral care in education and the contributions that are being made in different ways to innovate and develop new ideas and practice.

This month we are going to focus on the category of Pastoral School of the Year which was sponsored by BlueSky Education.

This category recognises schools that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.
 
The winner of this award in this category, announced at the presentation ceremony was Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland. 

This is the good practice in the school that impressed the judges. 

Limavady High School – How They Won the Award

The PTA funded 60 food hampers for FSM families. Years 11-14 Action Mental Health workshops.

One to one professional mentoring for boys at risk of underachieving.

Worked with UV Arts to provide a ten-week programme for vulnerable pupils.

Dedicated member of staff for lockdown outreach phone calls.

Pastoral Care Google Classroom for child protection and wellbeing.

Staff training: mental health first aid, suicide prevention, ACEs and neglect.

Wellbeing Week activities. Children’s Mental Health week activities.

14 pupils trained as Anti-Bullying Buddies.

RESTORE programme to address lockdown experiences.

Sensory room.

SEN lunch hub.

All Classroom Assistants trained in First Aid.

The judges were also impressed by the work and good practice of the finalists in this category and the positive support they are giving for the children and young people in their care. Here are some examples of that good practice.

The Good Practice Submitted by Finalists in the Category. 

Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland

At RSD there is a clear commitment to deliver outstanding pastoral provision both internally and beyond the school gates. In house, groups such as the pupil led ‘Safer School’ team raise whole school awareness regarding key issues. ‘Safe Space’ drop-in, run by local youth workers, pupils & staff, provides a ‘safe’ place for any pupil in need. There is an extensive preventative curriculum programme firmly embedded into school life. Groups such as AMH, Relax Kids, Youth for Christ & Niamh Louise Foundation are key. ‘Link’ teachers exist & staff have completed a wide range of quality pastoral training. RSD has also been at the heart of the community in organising a community wide mental health awareness campaign. Most recently it has secured funding from local churches, schools and businesses to enable the charity Reach Mentoring to start work in Dungannon.

Oakfield School, Hull

Oakfield School is a Residential co-educational school specialising in Social, Emotional, and Mental Health. Our passion for a whole school approach to pupils wellbeing is outstanding. The quality of our pastoral care influences the ethos and tone of the whole school alongside our enriched, engaging 24hr curriculum in a safe learning environment. During the pandemic staff have delivered food parcels, made weekly phone calls visited pupils and their families and paid for laptops/dongles for every pupil to support learning. Staffs determination to ensure pupils and their families wellbeing has remained Paramount is incredible. This is my reason for nominating Oakfield.

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

 This year, the school has supported pupils and families in more ways than usual. During lockdown, staff made weekly calls home, or more where needed. When issues were identified such as finance, housing or food issues, the team reacted quickly and liaised with agencies. Staff arranged for the food bank to provide food or dropped parcels off ourselves. School remained open for most and we introduced the Thrive programme to provide bespoke wellbeing interventions. We started art therapy and arranged alpaca, horse and gardening interventions for some. Parent support sessions were provided online and posted on a You Tube channel.

School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

As a school with a demonstrable commitment to pastoral care that is making a significant positive impact on our students’ social and emotional development, we would be delighted to be recognised by The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education. School for Inspiring Talents is an innovative independent therapeutic day school based in South Devon.  Established in 2014, it was set up with a clear vision to help transform the life chances of young people who have experienced childhood trauma.   We have a team of 73 dedicated teaching, clinical, therapeutic and office staff, supporting 53 students who have previously struggled in mainstream settings. The high staff:student ratio means that our students benefit from holistic pastoral support that meets their specific needs, helping them to overcome their individual barriers to learning.    Our innovative approach to education and commitment to pastoral care has delivered enormous impact on the lives of our students and their families. Feeling safe and secure with our dedicated team, our students WANT to come to school each day. They are able to build trusted relationships with staff as well as peer relationships with other students. We are privileged to see enormous progress with the children – something as small as giving eye contact, saying ‘good morning’, or playing with others can be a significant achievement for our students. Seeing their confidence and self-worth flourish is incredibly rewarding for staff. Our core values to Care, Nurture and Inspire, form the bedrock of our organisation as we support every learner to reach their individual potential. 100% of the children in our school have a specialist Education, Health and Care Plan with social and emotional mental health issues diagnosed as their primary need. Many are in care. On average at least 70% of have witnessed domestic violence, 68% have experienced physical and/or sexual abuse; 61% come from homes with parental mental health concerns and 92% are classified as having Type 3 Trauma (Complex Interpersonal Trauma). Many of the children are unable to use language to talk about their experiences. Several have been persistent school refusers in their previous school career. Our emphasis on pastoral care and support comes from the top; Mark Escott, Co-Founder of School for Inspiring Talents, experienced an abusive and chaotic childhood himself. As a dyslexic, he found school difficult and he found escape through drugs and crime, which later led to a two-year spell living in a hostel for young men on probation. Despite leaving school with no qualifications, Mark went on to carve out an impressive career as a child and adolescent behaviour specialist, working therapeutically with young people and families within the Social Care, Health and Education sectors. Driven by watching children slip through the net in mainstream schools, Mark set up Life Chance Education Ltd and went on to open School for Inspiring Talents to help transform the life chances of young people in our communities.  Based in school, our Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) provide a range of therapies to support our children’s individual needs.   Our MDT includes: Consultant Clinical Psychologist  Occupational Therapist  Speech and Language Therapist  Mental Health Practitioner  Trauma Recovery Practitioners  Family Support Workers  Therapeutic Outdoor Practitioner  Blu – our very special therapy dog. Our MDT work closely with teachers and support staff to ensure that students grow socially and emotionally alongside their educational development. A range of therapeutic assessments and methods are used by the team to help identify and support each student’s specific developmental needs. We have two Pastoral Co-ordinators at the school who each take the lead for our pastoral care across our two sites.  As TIS Practitioners (Trauma Informed Schools), they are the first point of contact for student and staff wellbeing in the school. Our Pastoral Co-ordinators oversee the strategies in place to help provide our students with the care and support they need to reach their potential.

Congratulations to all the finalists in this category for the excellent work you are doing to support learners and thank you to the nominees who highlighted this good practice that is taking place.

We hope to have nominations from the schools for the 2022 Awards to share more information about the good practice taking place.

REPORT: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones’ Report from the Organisation’s October NEC Meeting

The National Executive Committee (NEC) of the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE) met on Saturday 9thOctober.

Once again it was an online meeting because of the uncertainty of travelling from different parts of the United Kingdom and Europe caused by the pandemic.

It is frustrating that we are still unable to meet in person, but a sensible approach seems to be appropriate with members of NEC travelling long distances to attend.

Thanks to the commitment of members of NEC and the administrative support we were able to continue to be positive about the work of NAPCE and about plans, but it is not the same as being able to meet together to share ideas and discuss issues.

This is especially true because we have people who have recently joined NEC who we have not been able to meet in person.

Let us hope that this changes soon, and we will be able to be in the same room and fully involved in discussions and planning for future activities.

The meeting had a full agenda and covered a large amount of business to enable the association to continue its work and engagement with educationalists who share our interest in pastoral care and support for learners.

The meeting is an opportunity for members of NEC to update each other about their work on behalf of NAPCE since the last meeting.

An item about strategic planning included a discussion about using online opportunities to develop links with professionals working in different regions and to raise their awareness about NAPCE.

Jill Robson the national secretary provided an update about NEC elections and membership, and it was very encouraging to hear that there has been a large increase in the membership of the Association in the last year.

It is hoped that membership will continue to grow as NAPCE supports schools to respond to the challenges of the pandemic and how to meet the mental health and personal developments needs of children and young people.

The NEC were updated about the administrative support arrangements for the Association and given a positive report about the financial situation.

A report on publicity and marketing showed that the increased engagement with NAPCE continues.

Contact is being made with the Association through social media, the website and telephone.

Professor Stan Tucker, the Editor of the Associations academic journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ provided a very encouraging report with the number of articles being submitted for publication increasing and the international reputation of the journal growing.

A report was provided about the 2021 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education, following the awards ceremony organised by NAPCE in September.

There were more nominations in 2021 than in the previous year and the judges were very impressed by the excellent examples of good practice that were highlighted.

The presentation Ceremony took place online and was very well attended on the evening.

The guest speaker was the author, Daniel Sobel. The winners were announced, and their plaques have been sent to them in the post.

Some of the comments on the chat during the evening included

“Great presentation. Thank you, Daniel”
“Thank you to the NAPCE team for getting this together”
“Well done everyone and thanks for organising such a great event”
“Lovely to hear you so happy. Well done Achieve NI”
“Thanks for organising such a wonderful event!”
“Thanks to everyone, so proud of the team at LHS”

Plans were discussed for the 2022 Awards, and it was agreed that they would be launched in November.

Launch November 2021
Nominations Open November 2021
Nominations Close May 30th 2022
Judging Completed Friday 25th June 2022
Tickets for Presentation Available July 2022
Invitations to Attend Presentation July 2022
Presentation Event Autumn 2022

The meeting included a report on NAPCE activities in the last few months and although they have been restricted by the pandemic it has seen plenty of engagement and contact with educationalists form different parts of the UK and around the world. The online conference organised in the Spring was a huge success with over 900 people showing an interest in the conference on the NAPCE Eventbrite page. The conference included presentations on current pastoral topics and a ‘Question Time’ with an invited panel. Tickets sold out four weeks before the event and delegates attended from as far away as Sydney, Nairobi, North Vancouver and Lima.

These were some of the comments from delegates
“Absolutely brilliant. Just what I need at the moment”
“To all the presenters, well done”
“Really enjoyed the whole conference. Thank you to everyone at NAPCE”
“Very interesting Question time hosted by NAPCE and some thought provoking contributions”
“Excellent discussion with some interesting diverse ideas”
“Thank you NAPCE for organising a great event and providing the opportunity to explore some important current issues”
“Great webinar. Very useful.  Thank you NAPCE”

Next year will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE since it first started supporting Pastoral care in Education in 1982.

Several ideas for events and activities were discussed to celebrate the anniversary with plans for a weekend of events in the Autumn.

More details will be provided on social media, on the website and of course in future editions of the NAPCE monthly newsletter.

In the afternoon there was a meeting of the editorial Board which manages the Associations’ academic journal.

The next meeting of the NEC along with the AGM is planned for Saturday 26th March 2022.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE News – September 2021

NAPCE News – September 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: LGBT+ Issues in Schools: a Reflection on the First Anniversary of the Introduction of Statutory Relationships & Sex Education in England & Wales by Max Biddulph

LGBT+ issues in schools: a reflection on the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education in England and Wales by Max Biddulph

September 2021 marks the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) in England and Wales, following a campaign by researchers, practitioners and activists in the field over two decades, to secure a more solid footing for this subject in schools.

Along with PSHE, this subject not only comprises a strong component of the pastoral curriculum, it also informs the pastoral interventions that teachers make on a daily basis with children and young people on a one to one.

Being a gay man of ‘a certain age’ I know from my own ‘educational back-story’ why feeling included and supported in a personal identity is so important in sustaining a sense of self-esteem and associated feelings of agency, needed for personal growth and educational success.

These are not only conditions that I want for me, I feel they are absolutely fundamental for all human beings in the world. Given this backdrop, I would like to share with you some observations on this, the first anniversary of the new ‘curricular-pastoral environment’ in the teaching of LGBT+ issues in RSE.

Historically, a tension has always existed between the concepts of ‘schooling’ and ‘sexualities’ and in the UK context, attempts by the state to control the messaging to children and young people about sexuality and gender is characterised by legislation such as the now infamous Section 28 of the Local Government Act, 1988.

Developments in the new millennium changed this stance and a combination of homophobic/transphobic bullying research, calls from practitioners, pressure from LGBT+ Communities and the legal implications of the Equality Act 2010, have combined to create the antecedents for reform.

Given that schools are now required to teach either Relationships Education (primary) or Relationships and Sex Education (secondary), it was perhaps inevitable that the inclusion of LGBT+ issues would have the potential to initiate another round of controversy.

In her article ‘LGBT teaching in primary school: equality, discrimination and freedom of expression’ (Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 42(2) 243-245), Emma Nottingham (2020) captures what was in 2019, perhaps the peak moment in the challenge between members of mainly British Pakistani community and an inner-city primary school where weeks of protest on the street outside the school culminated in a legal injunction being sought by Birmingham City Council to restrict the street gatherings and the online abuse made via social media of staff teaching the Relationships Education curriculum.

At the heart of this dispute is the question as to whether it is appropriate to teach primary school children about a range of relationships and identities that exist in society i.e. heterosexual, same-sex etc.

In the case of Birmingham City Council vs Afsar, Nottingham (2020) notes that the ruling by Mr Justice Warby who found in favour of the city council, drew on both the UK Equality Act 2010 and the European Convention on Human Rights.  With regard to the latter, Justice Warby stated that his judgement sought to strike a balance between Article 10 (freedom of expression), Article 8 (right to private and family life), Article 9 (freedom of thought conscience and religion and Article 11 (freedom of association). This is an important judgement for two reasons:

  1. It sets a precedent in the legal acceptance of Relationships and Sex Education to be taught in an inclusive way i.e portraying the full range of sexualities and relationships
  2. It shines a light of the extraordinarily complex territory that education has to navigate in terms of culture, values and what constitutes ‘age-appropriate knowledge’.

In responding to the challenge of teaching RSE in schools where cultural diversity is very prominent, a number of really significant implications emerge.

The first of these relates to the need for a really robust stance when it comes to the ways in which equality diversity and inclusion will be addressed in the day-to-day activity of the school.

Having worked with colleagues in the school at the centre of the dispute, I can see that their stance on this is the bedrock of their practice, and the mechanism that ultimately lead to a legal resolution of the issue. This ‘whole school approach’ permeates not just the statements in policies that position the schools’ values but communicates the need for respect in all relationships in the school community.

The latter requires incredibly sensitive handling and an ability to engage in assertive communication that simultaneously ‘holds’ and respects the range of diversity.

In the post local education authority era where specialist professional development has to be sought further afield, I would urge schools not to struggle with these issues on their own. Specialist advice is available from national organisations such as the Sex Education Forum/National Childrens Bureau, who can advise for example, on consultations/information giving for parents about the content and delivery of RSE.

A second ‘implication’ relates to the ways in which communities and identities are understood by practitioners. An unsettling dimension of the dispute is the fact that the issues cut across sensitive domains of race, culture, faith, ethnicity and sexuality.

It would be easy to stereotype individuals based on these dimensions and the problem with this is that it leads to blind spots which obscure the complexity of intersectionality. With a more open mind it is possible to see how for example, a young person of British Pakistani heritage could find themselves curious or questioning their sexual orientation.

Fifty years of narratives of LGBT+ experience has taught us what a potentially lonely and difficult place this is, emotionally. Having an identity acknowledged or affirmed albeit in the form of a passing reference, could be crucial to longer term experience of self-esteem.

Since these tumultuous events of 2019, life in the school briefly returned to normal and the street outside fell silent again.

The arrival of the Covid-19 global pandemic with all the diversion and disruption that ensued, has briefly drawn a curtain over the new dawn of RSE in schools in England and Wales.

The issue of mental well-being in school communities has surfaced as a key consideration and this illuminates a final implication emerging from the case.

Staff self-care needs to be paramount especially in situations where staff find themselves caught in situations where strongly held values and emotions are being expressed in relation to the inclusion of LGBT+ issues.

Some comfort can be taken from the fact that legal injunctions can be taken out to prevent the online abuse of school staff via social media and the fact as Nottingham (2020:245) observes:
‘that sex and relationships education can be capable of reflecting various relationship types whist respecting the values and cultures and religions that advocate heterosexual relationships’.

Max Biddulph, Chair Editorial Board, Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

AWARDS: Tickets Available for NAPCE Awards 2021

National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021

Excitement is building ahead of for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 Presentation Event this month.

This important event in the educational calendar takes place this year online on Thursday 23rd September at 7pm.

Join with NAPCE to celebrate the good practice in pastoral care in education as the winners in each category are announced.

There are a few remaining tickets for links to the event. Follow this link to register. https://napceawardspresentation2021.eventbrite.co.uk/

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsor BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Finalists
Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland
Oakfield School
The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester
Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland
School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsor – The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Finalists
The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London
All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire
Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland
Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsor- Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Finalists
Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire
Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland, nominated by Laura Fisher
Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire
Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire
Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsor  Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Finalists
Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland
Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community SchoolBelmont Durham
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester
Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year – Sponsor NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Finalists
Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program
St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum
Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire, Flourish Personal Development Programme
The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme
Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

Finalists
Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull
Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School,Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire
AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Finalists
Bromsgrove International School, Thailand
Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern
Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsor -The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

To be announced at the event.
 

RESEARCH: Invitation to Take Part in Research Focused on Online Safety for Young People

NAPCE has been informed about some important research into keeping young people safe online.

The researchers who have been guest writers for NAPCE News and recently presented at the NAPCE online conference are recruiting parents in the UK who have at least one child aged 13-18.

They have provided us with the following details.

“We are a team of researchers interested in learning how parents of youth (aged 13 to 18) such as you perceive the impact of COVID-19 on the sexual and gendered risks and harms that young people face online.

“By completing this survey, you would be helping to inform resources for young people, teachers, and parents on how to stay safe online during the pandemic and beyond.”

Link to the survey: https://form.typeform.com/to/hCwcfzF5?typeform-source=t.co

Thanks!
Kaity

Dr.Kaitlynn Mendes
Associate Professor of Sociology
Western University”

EVENT: Pastoral Leaders Invited to Attend New Pastoral Forum

NAPCE is pleased to have been invited to attend the Pastoral Forum for the recently formed International Forum for Inclusive Practitioners by Inclusion Expert who are one of the sponsors for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 being organised by NAPCE.

They have sent NAPCE the following details.

“We’d like to remind all those with a pastoral interest that the Pastoral Forum is next week on Thursday 23rd at 2pm London BST.

If you know of any pastoral leaders, please let them know about it.

For more details and to find out about the link to this forum please contact

Lesley Bradley
Secretary to Daniel Sobel, CEO
lesley.bradley@inclusionexpert.com

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE Awards 2022 – ENTRY NOW OPEN

Entry for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 is now open.

The Awards is the first and only scheme based in the UK to recognise great practice of pastoral care providers in the education sector.

We have been delighted with the success of the NAPCE Awards since we launched in 2020 and the initiative continues to go from strength to strength.

We hosted a packed and exciting Presentation Evening in September 2021 and we are planning to host an in-person event for the first time in 2022, all being well.

The Awards will be part of a programme of events to celebrate NAPCE’S 40th anniversary in 2022.

The closing date for all categories this year will be Monday May 30th, 2022, so don’t hang around, get your entries in now.

Just like previous years, the finalists of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education will be selected by an independent judging panel and invited to attend the ceremony to share the experience with peers and find out who wins each Award.

NAPCE is inviting nominations in the following categories;

Pastoral School of the Year
Pastoral Team of the Year
Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
Pastoral Leader of the Year
Pastoral Development of the Year
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
International Contribution to Pastoral Care

You can enter the NAPCE categories here Enter here

Nominations are encouraged for awards in different categories from schools and educational establishments and you DO NOT need to currently be a member of NAPCE to take part.

NAPCE Awards 2022 is an excellent opportunity to share good practice in pastoral care and through our social media, website and those of our partners, the Awards raises awareness of where pastoral support is making a real difference in the educational experience of young people.

The Awards also encourages new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and will recognise the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

This is an opportunity to recognise the impact the work of pastoral staff is having on the achievement and well being of young people.

The decisions about prize winners in each category will be made by a panel of invited professionals who work in pastoral care.

There will be a prize of £100.00 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

The criteria for the NAPCE awards are;

•Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school

•Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with

•Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success

•Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with

•Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people

•Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people

•Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care

•International Contribution to Pastoral CareAn international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Nominations for the NAPCE Awards are welcome from member schools and institutions and from schools and institutions that are not currently members of NAPCE.

NAPCE Awards 2021 – WATCH A REPLAY HERE

We were thrilled with the amazing success of the second annual National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

More entries, more categories, a bigger event – crucially supported by more influential organisations than ever before.

Guest speaker Daniel Sobel of Inclusion Expert, joined NAPCE Chair Phil Jones, our host and treasurer Victoria Bownes and all finalists and winners to celebrate great work in pastoral care in education.

In case you didn’t make the finals, couldn’t get along to the online event or simply want to see what it’s all about, we’re very pleased to share a recording of the virtual soiree, right here

We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies.