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NAPCE News – May 2022

NAPCE News – May 2022

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  NAPCE Vice Chair Dr Matt Silver Explores the Value and Management of Energy During a Crisis

Energy During a Crisis

We are all seeking change, yet require the energy to action it. 

This pandemic has hit us in phases and as a result each phase has demanded a different energy from the whole education sector. Unlike typical change, the pandemic has seen the number of phases continue to mount, some expected overnight, some slowly burning our resources almost unconsciously.

Two years ago, it was very much crisis. I sat at my desk as a head teacher in denial.

Surely the news was exaggerated? Surely the talk of lockdown was the media gaining clicks? What was coming wasn’t going to truly close the country and our school down?

As the guidance came in (and then changed), it felt like a scene out of a movie. Concern swept across the face of every learner and teacher.

Doubt. Fear. Anxiety over whether they should be in school, protecting themselves or their loved ones. A war cabinet was drawn up and battle plans made to execute orders in order to navigate safety and survival for our community and global pandemic.

Tough decisions were made, and looking back now you can pick which ones saw an emotional overload take over the control panel.

A Downward Spiral 

We were in the survival stage. This demanded us to lead and try to remain stable in a context of stress, anxiety and panic.

Much like a sprinter it demanded adrenaline and produced much cortisol but instead of a short journey, this has become a marathon of sprints, almost normalised, and as a result burnout is evident.

For many, this has led to a negative cycle that still has many leaders running it in a state of fight, flight or freeze.

I coached a client last week who had refused to book in a session since December, simply because they were too concerned with their staff to take an hour for themselves and this is after the restrictions have lifted.

Such an imbalanced physiological and psychological state has kept our parasympathetic nervous system switched on constantly, meaning that with no recovery, a less active immune and digestive system, stress has become anxiety and anxiety is leading to depression and disconnection.

Without the awareness, literacy, or management to shift out of this state, professionals have resorted to different coping mechanisms.

Flight from the profession has clearly be seen with the great resignation, as has the freeze when it comes to the national shortage of those seeking to step into leadership and guide their communities for the storm (53% of deputy heads do not want to take the step).

In many conversations and reports, the top layer of education is crumbling and further exposing their communities to the same suffering when they need stability.

Wellbeing initiatives are not the solution as the majority are extrinsic and temporary glimmers of positivity.

To develop our capacity and wisdom to evolve with change must be intrinsic. It has to be the body and mind making the decision together and to choose to unite with others if rejection is going to be prevented.

The only consistent wellbeing that is present is our emotional state and this must remain positive to move forward.

Moving up the Spiral

To address this negative spiral of ourselves and our communities requires us to recognise that all we can control during a time of sensory overload, is our own physiological and psychological state.

This is not about chunks of time, but instead regenerating energy. Space to allow for an awareness of where our energy levels are and how we are using it for optimal recovery and then performance. The same to reconnect with those around us are and the climate surrounding us (in multiple forms).

Is the internal and external energy gain and spend where we want it to be? Is there balance? Only with awareness and a common language can we apply the tools to navigate our state.

Our schools are our boats. The captain has to know where they are going, how to pace the journey subject to conditions so it is sustainable for the crew, our engine.

I was fortunate enough to integrate self-management tools into my own practice and the school’s culture before the pandemic having been coached by a group called Complete, who focus on vertical development (upgrading the processor, not adding more apps). By no means did this mean plain sailing, but it did allow our team to seek balance in the eye of the storm, gain a greater capacity to adapt and therefore be there to guide others.

What we looked to provide was the awareness of our human bodies attention to homeostasis (balance).

The space to understand this allows us to take the first step to understanding why it is we are having such reactions to change, such outbursts that flare up in resistance or shutdowns and denial. Our bodies pH, oxygen levels, blood sugars (the list goes on) is so acute that the body goes to extremes to maintain it. The same can be said with the biological lab that is our body.

What we are seeking is to counter what lies behind most forms of coping; fear of losing balance. Why is this not more obvious? When we are in a negative state, our mind does not alert us to this in order to ensure we can run through pain barriers in order to survive.

When not using our pre-frontal lobes (our smart thinking) we still believe we are making rational decisions.

To address stress and anxiety build up, we can foster our DHEA production- the performance hormone and an antidote to cortisol.

Our coaching programme often starts with polyvagal exercises that inform our brains that all is OK and in a safe state to switch our parasympathetic nervous system on and allow rest and recovery mode. This allows us to move into positive emotional states and our pre-frontal lobe to switch on once more.

The key question to ask yourself is do you know when you are making erratic decisions and if you do, can you self-manage yourself out of this state? Do our learners not need the same? Imagine. We can no longer seek the conditions to do this as the conditions are in constant flux. We need to step back, enquire, gain awareness, and only then can we set a wiser course.

Whilst much has been rightly made of education reform, we must be able to consciously be in a balanced state if we are going to reduce the resistance and increase the quality and therefore coherence of the direction we are to take. So before reform, we feel you need to overcome the resistance and prepare for the journey. To begin this we require:

External and Inner Space

Often with coaching leaders or their teams, it is the simplicity of stepping out of their typical routines and providing them with a safe space to reconnect with their essence, examine their own personal and professional journey and resulting state from multiple angles held most value.

Having facilitated in various forms with hundreds of leaders over the pandemic, this is the most consistent pattern.

It is not that they need expertise or training of processes, but the space and map to look beneath their own surface and in doing so discovering their own state at multiple levels, their own purpose, and aligning these to function at peak performance.

The simplicity of such space and the common frameworks of adult development to guide the next steps have increased leaders’ capacity despite a global crisis.

When they experience the payback for themselves, they begin the same exploration within their teams, and it spreads to their learners. This allows them to maintain their captaincy, ship and align their course, ensuring others are still on board, have agency and remain for the journey despite the waves of constant flux we will continue to navigate.

As each lockdown receded and restrictions eased, we felt the need to rebalance and realign as we began to reconnect in physical form.

The appreciation for connection left us in a positive emotional state that allowed us to see hope again.

Whilst digital platforms provided an invaluable bridge, they serve only two senses.

Let us not forget how valuable those spaces to connect with each other and ourselves are.

Change is constant but so is growth.

To get you through to the end of term and start next year as a new chapter, Pathways Development is delivering a virtual masterclass on energy management. 

Click here to book your ticket: https://www.pathways-ed.org/pathways-development-events.

We cover the 5 E’s of Energy:

  1. Environment
  2. Emotion
  3. Eating and Exercise
  4. Essence
  5. Encompass

Dr Matt Silver is the CEO of Pathways Education and the Vice Chair of NAPCE. He is a system designer that implements deep learning and expansive development in a meaningful digital hybrid for leaders and learners alike whilst creating outstanding provisions. 

Pathways group of schools, colleges and leadership programmes live their mission by facilitating the individual and collective journey we are each on, driving learners to enhance their capacity, becoming self-determined and self-authoring so that they can dynamically connect with change. 

To create equitable communities, Pathways is building a flourishing co-operative that provides seed funding and incubation of social enterprises created by a network of the least served members in society, those with additional needs. This is supported by the profits generated by their international coaching and consultancy development offer. They created this during the pandemic.

GOOD PRACTICE: We Shine a Spotlight on the Great Work of the Finalists in “International Contribution” at NAPCE Awards 2021

Good Practice in Pastoral Care in Education

NAPCE is pleased to raise awareness about good practice in pastoral care in education highlighted by the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

This month it is the turn of last year’s finalists in the International Contribution to Pastoral Care category sponsored by the Hult International Business School.

This award is for an international school or organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

The winner in this category in 2021 was Bromsgrove International School, Thailand. 

Their nomination was for the creation and launch of the Bromsgrove Boarding Skills Awards scheme, which allows students a unique opportunity to reflect on their development and growth in boarding as well as obtaining micro-credentials.

The modules focused on characteristics required for later life and have a positive impact on academic work.

While the boarders do not have much time to ‘get bored’, equipping them with new skills to ensure they keep active helps with their mental health, an area increasingly prominent in pastoral care.

The scheme empowers students to better themselves and the community they live in, setting them on a path to become outstanding global citizens.

Other nominations in this category included Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern. 

Stephany’s work with inclusion at ISZL has had a powerful impact on many young people’s lives.

She works with students, staff, and the wider community to ensure the school stands behind its inclusion policy.

The nomination included the comment, “We Are All ISZL”, whatever their gender expression, identity, sexual orientation, race, or religion.

She has developed and nurtured the school’s Diversity, Equality, and Inclusion Network. Her work with students and staff has given an opportunity for people who may feel reluctant to share their voice a safe place to be heard and the chance to drive change forward.

Another example of good practice in this category was the nomination for Child1st Consultancy Limitedfor the work of Ann Marie Christian.

Ann Marie has delivered training and consultancy to international schools since 2008. She was headhunted and recommended to a CEO of a school in Dubai and continues to deliver this work.

She has spoken at International Conferences in the Middle East, the Caribbean, and the Far East. She writes articles and raises the awareness of the importance of well-being and educating people internationally about child abuse and how to report it and spot the signs.

In 2019 Ann Marie was recognised and won the Wintrade International Award for Women in the Public Sector. She is an associate consultant for COIS and BSME.
 
The closing date for nominations for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE is on 30th May, 2022, so now is the time to spend a few minutes making a nomination to recognise the good practice and hard work of people working in pastoral care in education to make a difference in the education of children and young people.

ENTER NOW: https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

Nominations are free and a grand presentation event is planned for October to announce the winners in each category.

More information can be found at https://www.napce.org.uk/napce-awards-2022-entry-now-open/                                                                                         

 

WELCOME: Meet New NAPCE NEC Member Luke Ramsden

Welcome to Luke Ramsden

We are very pleased to welcome Luke Ramsden as a member of the NAPCE National Executive Committee.

Luke is Senior Deputy Headteacher and senior Safeguarding Lead at St Benedict’s School in Ealing in London Luke was the winner of the Pastoral Leader of the Year Awardsponsored by Taylor and Francis, in the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE.

This award is for a leader who has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

His nomination for the award explained how Luke had been responsible for developing outstanding safeguarding and pastoral practice at St Benedict’s School and how he has introduced a range of initiatives that have promoted the safety and wellbeing of pupils.

This has included successful campaigns to tackle bullying, peer-on-peer abuse and mental health issues where Luke has made use of accurate data to identify, predict and effectively target problems.

Luke is also the Chair of a Safeguarding Advisory Panel that provides expert advice and is regularly invited to speak at safeguarding events and conferences.

His contribution to the development of effective safeguarding and pastoral practice has been truly outstanding.

Luke started his teaching career at Tonbridge School where he was Head of History and was then a Housemaster at Ampleforth College before moving to Ealing.

In his role as Senior Deputy Head he is responsible for the day-to-day running of the school, as well as the pastoral oversight of all the students and overseeing the school’s PSHE programme (among a number of other roles).

In his time at St Benedict’s the school has become a flagship school for safeguarding and pastoral care, with the happiness of every student placed firmly at the heart of all the school does.

Luke regularly talks at educational conferences, and writes on safeguarding, pastoral care, and in particular the use of data to inform excellence in both these areas.

Among other positions Luke holds outside St Benedict’s is as Trustee of the School’s Consent Project charity.

We are delighted that Luke has become a member of the National Executive Committee and he has already started contributing to the work of the Association and will be speaking at the June online conference and at the National Safeguarding Conference in London in September on behalf of NAPCE.

If you might be interested in contributing to the work of NAPCE as a member of the National Executive Committee then you first need to become a member of the Association.

Please contact admin@napce.org.uk to let us know that you are interested in contributing to the work of the Association and for further details.

It would be great to hear form you if you are interested in pastoral care in education and are passionate about supporting children and young people to achieve their full potential from their education.                                                                                            

 

CONFERENCE: FREE Tickets Available Now for NAPCE Online Spring Conference 2022

Online Spring Conference 2022

‘How can effective pastoral care support learners and prepare them for their future roles in society’? 

After months of planning for the NAPCE Online Conference 2022 we now have less than one month to wait for the event.

If you haven’t secured your place already, now is the time to book your ticket, so you do not miss out on the brilliant line up of speakers who are covering important issues for everybody interested in pastoral care or working in a pastoral role in education.

You can join one of the biggest events on the pastoral calendar with the ‘Pastoral Question Time’ on the Thursday evening of the Conference.

Pour yourself a glass of wine or cup of tea, send in your questions (to admin@napce.org.uk ) and listen to the views of our expert panel from around the world.

Join other people interested in pastoral care in education live on the evening by registering on Eventbrite for your ticket.

The links for the events will be sent out to ticket holders in the next few weeks.

BOOK FREE TICKETS HERE:
https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME
Wednesday 15 June
2-00pm Welcome to the Conference – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE
2-10pm Presentation 1– The School Response to Online Sexual Harassment and Abuse., Professor Kaitlyn Mendes, University of western Ontario Canada.
2-40pm Questions
2-45pm Presentation 2 – Developing Effective Supervision for Safeguarding, Carl Elder, Educational Consultant
3-15pm Questions
3-20pm Presentation 3 – The Rock and Roll Years for Education and the Lessons for Pastoral Care, Les Walton, CBE, Educationalist and Author
3-50pm Questions
3-55pm Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Thursday 16th June
7-00pm to 8-00pm NAPCE QUESTION TIME – How can pastoral care and support in schools enable young people to achieve their full potential? 
Chaired by Phil Jones – Chair of NAPCE
Invited onto panel,
Dr Noel Purdy– Deputy Editor of Pastoral Care in Education.
Maria O’Neil – Author ‘Proactive Pastoral Care
Dr Mark Diacoupolos, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Leadership, Pittsburg State University. USA
Charlie Walker, Student member of NAPCE National Executive.
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London.
Dr Helen O’Connor, St Swithins’ School Psychologist.

Friday 17th June 
10-00am Welcome – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE
10-10am Presentation 4 – Using data to Create a Proactive Pastoral Strategy, Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
10-40 Questions
10-45am Presentation 5 – Lessons from Pastoral Care in a Special School, Nadine Huseyin, Family Support, Pastoral and Safeguarding lead, the Grove School Tottenham
11-15am Questions
11-20am Presentation 6 –The future Challenges of Managing Behaviour, Phil Jones, National Chair, The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education
11-50 am Questions
11-55am Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Speakers and guests on the Question Time panel include:

Dr Helen O’Connor – Following a Clinical Doctorate from Royal Holloway University in 2001 Helen developed a specialist interest in OCD and eating disorders and worked for 14years within CAMHS and in her last position before leaving the NHS as the Lead Consultant Psychologist for a Psychological Therapies team within an adolescent inpatient unit. Helen left the NHS to work at St Swithun’s in 2015 as the schools Psychologist. Whilst working primarily with girls both preventing and managing mental health problems, Helen has developed an interest in helping teachers and education leaders consider ways of improving wellbeing for pupils in the classroom. Helen has introduced a positive education curriculum and this has now been nominated for a TES award for Pastoral Initiative of the Year 2022.

Dr Kaitlyn Mendes – Kaitlynn Mendes, PhD, is Associate Professor of Sociology and Canada Research Chair in Inequality and Gender at the University of Western Ontario, Canada and Honorary Professor of Gender, Media, and Sociology at the University of Leicester, UK. She has written widely about young people’s experiences of sexual violence, and the creative ways they have used digital technologies to challenge it. She is author of numerous books and articles including: Digital Feminist Activism: Girls and Women Fight Back Against Rape Culture (2019) and is currently co-writing a book called: Life After Lockdown: Young People, Schools, and Recovering from the Pandemic.

My presentation will focus on the crisis in schools around sexual violence, stemming from the Instagram site and website Everyone’s Invited, and the ways schools and teachers have struggled to respond. The talk is based on research conducted between March 2021-March 2022 with nearly 1000 young people and 77 teachers in England.

Dr Noel Purdy

MA (Cantab), MA (Ed.), MEd, PhD, PGCE, PGCCET, SFHEA, FLF, FCMI, CMgr
Director of Research and Scholarship, Head of Education Studies
Stranmillis University College, Belfast

Dr Noel Purdy is Director of Research and Scholarship and Head of Education Studies at Stranmillis University College, where he is also Director of CREU (the Centre for Research in Educational Underachievement).  He lectures at undergraduate and postgraduate level and has a particular research interest in educational underachievement, special educational needs and tackling bullying in schools.  He studied Modern and Medieval Languages at Cambridge University before teaching French and German in two post-primary schools (one all-ability, one grammar) in Northern Ireland. He has also taught in Germany and Switzerland.  He was the northern co-chair of the all-Ireland Standing Conference on Teacher Education North and South (SCoTENS) 2016-2021 and remains on their steering committee.  He is a member and former chair of the Northern Ireland Anti-Bullying Forum (NIABF 2013-2016) and was President of NASEN in Northern Ireland (2014-2016).  Recent research projects include a two-year Erasmus+ project working with 4 other EU partners to address cyberbullying in schools, a study of parental experiences of the SEN system in Northern Ireland funded by NICCY, two surveys of parental experiences of lockdown home-schooling in Northern Ireland in 2020 and 2021, a report on loyalist and republican former prisoners’ attitudes to educational underachievement, and (currently) a study of perceptions of level 4 and 5 vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland funded by the Department for the Economy. He is Editor (Acting) of Pastoral Care in Education – An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development. He chaired the Expert Panel on Educational Underachievement in Northern Ireland 2020-2021 whose final report and action plan A Fair Start was launched on 1 June 2021.  Most recently in February 2022 he was appointed Chair of the Steering Committee to review the 2013 Action Plan on Bullying in Ireland, appointed by Education Minister Norma Foley TD.

For more information about the presenters and guests 
on the Question Time Panel please follow us on Twitter @NAPCE1 or visit the ticket link here
https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

CELEBRATION DINNER: Join us to Celebrate NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary

You are invited to the Anniversary dinner to celebrate the 40 years since NAPCE was formed.

It will be an opportunity to meet with other people who have contributed to the history of NAPCE and to celebrate the difference it has made for raising awareness about pastoral care in education and the difference it makes to the learning experience for children and young people and supports their personal development to prepare them for their future lives in society.

This event will take place at the Worcestershire Cricket Ground, overlooking the Severn River and cathedral in Worcester.

It takes place on Saturday 8th October as part of a weekend of events to celebrate the anniversary which include a two-day conference and the presentation for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022.

The event is open to members and non-members.

Availability is limited and you are advised to reserve your ticket early to avoid disappointment.

Tickets can be reserved by visiting https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/napce-40th-anniversary-dinner-tickets-299335118397

The programme for the evening is,

7-00pm Guests Arrive – Prosecco Welcome Reception.
7-30pm Three Course Anniversary Dinner.

Dinner menu

  1. Starter                       
  2. Cream of Leek, Potato and Watercress Soup, Croutons (V) (GF)
  3. Main course             
  4. Roasted Chicken Supreme, Gratin Potato, and Red Wine Gravy (GF
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Vegetarian/Vegan Gluten Free option 

  1. Starter
  2. Leek, Sweet Potato and Spinach Soup (GF)
  3. Main course
  4. Butternut Squash, Sweet Potato and Roasted Red Peppers, Parsley and Dill Sauce with Tender Stem Broccoli (GF)
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Please advise in advance of the evening if you would prefer the vegetarian option or if you have any additional dietary requirements.

8-30pm After Dinner Speaker – Les Walton CBE

Les as he explains in his recently published book ’Education the Rock and Roll Years. A Northern Perspective on A lifetime of learning Teaching and Leading’, was one of the leading educationalists involved in the forming of NAPCE in 1982.

As the title of the book suggests, Les has a wide experience of education in recent history that he will share with guests at the dinner.

9-30 pm Pay bar available until 11-00 pm to meet old friends and make new friends. Please note this is a cashless venue.

The cost of the Anniversary Dinner is £35.00 for full members of NAPCE, £40.00 for Associate members and £45.00 for non- members.

Please dress to impress.

Please note that tickets will not be refunded unless the event is cancelled by the Association for reasons beyond its control when a full refund will be made.

There are direct train services from London to Worcester Foregate Station which is a ten-minute walk or short taxi ride from the venue.

Cross country trains call at the new Worcestershire Parkway, which has connections to Foregate Street. There is parking available at the venue and at public car parks nearby.

The venue has a Premier Inn Hotel on the site and there is a good choice of other options for accommodation in the city of Worcester.

Please book your tickets early to ensure that you do not miss this important event in NAPCE’s history to celebrate the contribution it has made to education in the last 40 years.

If you have any questions about the event, please contact NAPCE administration at admin@napce.co.uk

 

40th ANNIVERSARY: Weekend Conference Details Released to Mark Four Decades of NAPCE

We are very proud to reveal details of the weekend conference to mark NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary in October.

Further details are being added in the coming weeks.

Dates for the Diary

The 40th Anniversary Conference and Events Weekend – October 2022

Venue
Worcestershire County Cricket Club
County Ground
New Road
Worcester
WR2 4QQ

Friday 7th October

Conference Day One

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Research and Policy making.

Confirmed Speakers

Dr Noel Purdy – Director of Research and Scholarship at Stranmillis University College, Belfast, and Deputy Editor of ‘Pastoral Care in Education’
Maria O Neil – Educationalist and author of ‘Proactive Pastoral Care’
Professor Helen Cowie – University of Surrey

Invited and waiting for confirmation 

The Rt Hon Nadim Zahawi, Secretary of State for Education
Ofsted
Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Saturday 8th October 

Conference Day Two

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Good Practice.
Daniel Sobel – Educationalist, author and founder and CEO of Inclusion Expert
Ron Skelton – Headteacher and CEO of Broadway School, Perry Barr, Birmingham
Dr Helen O Connor – Psychologist at St Swithun’s School in Winchester
Invited and to be confirmed
Mrs Heather Hansbury, President, Girls School Association

Workshops include:

Jill Robson – NAPCE National Secretary – Effective PSHE

Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Tickets: https://napce2022.eventbrite.co.uk/

Reduced price tickets will be available for NAPCE members, and a reduced-price ticket will be available for both days of the conference.

Other Events planned for the Anniversary weekend in Worcester include 

Friday 7th October 7-00pm
Presentation Event for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 Closes on May 30th

There are just a few days left to enter the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards takes place in our 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – March 2022

NAPCE News – March 2022

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  “Priorities for Pastoral Care in the Future” by NAPCE Chair Phil Jones

Priorities for Pastoral Care in The Future

Is the priority for pastoral care in the 21st century to meet the needs of schools or the needs of the children and young people they care for?

Recent educational publications have questioned the purpose of education in the 21st century.

One example is Martin Illingworth’s book, ‘Forget School. Why young people are succeeding on their own terms and what schools can do to avoid being left behind.’

In the book he argues that learners are finding their own ways to develop their skills and understanding that they need to prepare themselves for their future lives because the experience they have in school is not relevant to them.

The priorities in education for young people which include being able to network effectively, manage their finances responsibly and be digitally proficient and alert to the world around them are not goals that are priorities for schools in the current educational system.

‘As far as I can see the children are there to serve the school, not the other way around. The school has to compete with the one down the road for a label that says it is a success’ (Illingworth 2020).

Priya Lakhani in her book, ‘Inadequate. The system failing our teachers and your children’ calls for a more ambitious view about the purpose of education in the 21st century.

She comments that despite the intellectual, technological, and educational abilities, reaching greater heights than at any time in our existence, our schools are still focused on achieving the very basics of functioning humans – how to read and how to use numbers.

‘Teachers spend most of their time importing basic knowledge and skills that have changed little for centuries’ (Lakhani 2020).

She uses a quote from Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft to illustrate her argument.

‘Success today requires the agility and drive to constantly rethink, reinvigorate, react and reinvent’.

This discussion has implications for pastoral leaders in their planning and delivery of pastoral care to ensure that it is relevant to children and young people and supports their preparation for their future in the workplace and in society.

‘Children in primary schools now will be looking for work in the 2030s. What knowledge and skills will they need in order to succeed?’ (Lakhani 2020)

To achieve success, people will need to develop and use effectively, their social and emotional skills.

Staff in their pastoral roles will be responsible for using pastoral structures and systems to develop these social and emotional skills that will be important in the modern workplace and society.

In a recent article in The Times newspaper, Margaret Thatcher’s former Trade and Industry Secretary in the 1980s – Lord Young of Graffham – commented on how in his opinion schools, colleges and universities were failing to prepare young people either for life or work.

‘People come out of school completely unaware of the world they are going to be moving into’ (Times 2022)

Pastoral leaders need to reflect on what the goals are for the pastoral work of the school and how the pastoral structures and systems can contribute to preparing learners for their future lives.

One issue that highlights the challenges for pastoral leaders in providing learners with a relevant learning experience, is the issue about the use of mobile phones in schools.

It is easy to understand why pastoral staff will implement strategies and rules that control the use of mobile telephones in schools.

There is no doubt that the use of mobile phones can be abused in schools especially with high quality cameras and the difficulties with controlling what can be accessed on the internet.

Mobile phones can be a distraction for learning with children and young people under peer pressure to be fully aware of the latest information shared on social media.

However, the reality is that mobile phones are a part of daily life and that includes being a valuable tool in the workplace and an important part of social interaction in the modern world.

A decision to ban mobile phones during the school day, it can be argued, enables the school to provide a safe learning environment where the focus is on learning.

Is this not in reality, a missed opportunity to teach learners, through the pastoral curriculum, the safe and responsible use of the technology.

A ban on mobile phones may enable schools to provide an orderly learning environment but at the cost of a missed opportunity to prepare children and young people to use technology safely and responsibly.

A challenging question for pastoral leaders is whether the purpose of pastoral care in schools is to encourage compliant and conforming learners to enable the school to achieve good examination results or to encourage learners to question and challenge views and opinions to develop informed understanding about issues that are important for their daily lives.

The January National Conference for Pastoral Leaders organised by ASCL explored the heightened focus on how schools respond to sexual harassment and abuse.

Research by Ofsted, discussed at the Conference, reported that children and young people are more likely to share concerns with their peers than with adults.

It also reported that sexual harassment and abuse is also taking place in primary schools. (Ofsted 2021).

This has implications for pastoral leaders for the culture they want to develop in their schools.

Professor Jessica Ringrose, speaking at the Conference, reported that from her research they had found that only 2% of children and young people reporting concerns about sexual harassment and abuse, reported it to their schools.

This raises questions about how confident children and young people are that schools understand their daily life experiences and whether they can provide appropriate support and guidance in response to the issues that are important to them.

There were also questions raised from the research about the pastoral strategies used by schools with the findings reporting that children and young people did not like assemblies as a way of providing guidance about sensitive issues and would prefer opportunities to discuss them in small groups.

Pastoral leaders need to reflect on the purpose of their pastoral work and develop and implement strategies that are relevant for the life experiences of the children and young people in their care.

One example of this comes from earlier in my teaching career when in the role of Head of Year, I was approached by a group of my students who said they were concerned about the bullying that was taking place in the school.

At the time, the response of most schools was that there was “no bullying in our school” but the evidence from the students was presenting a different picture.

After doing a survey which showed that there were significant concerns about bullying following further discussions with the students, we established a student listening service called ‘I believe’ where students could share concerns with their peers.

The strategy was not popular with all the adults in the school with some members of staff expressing the view that “there is now more bullying because you are  talking about it”.

The view from students was the complete opposite with feedback that because students could now raise concerns less bullying was now taking place.

It was going to take time, but the feedback from students showed that the strategy was changing the culture so that bullying would no longer be acceptable in the school community.

The work of the school was recognised by being nominated for the First ever ‘Philip Lawrence Awards’ in 1997.

This led to one of the more terrifying experiences in my teaching career when a limousine picked me up outside my house at 5-00am and I was taken to London to appear on breakfast television to talk about ‘I believe’.

This and other awards that followed showed that the pastoral work of schools to improve the learning experience and personal development of children and young people is valued in society.

If pastoral care is going to be relevant for children and young people in the future, then it is important that schools listen to them.

Adults working in schools, need to have an understanding about what is important to children and young people in their daily lives.

This will ensure that there is clarity about the support children and young people need as learners.

It will also ensure that their learning experience supports their personal development and prepares them for their future lives in society.

Please share your views and ideas with NAPCE about how pastoral care can contribute to the learning experience of young people in a modern rapidly changing technological world.

You can do this by following NAPCE on Twitter and by participating in the events and activities NAPCE has planned for 2022.

Phil Jones
National Chair
The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

The views expressed in the article are my own and not necessarily the views of the Association and are intended to stimulate discussion and debate about the future role of pastoral care in education. 

References
Illingworth, M. (2020). Forget School. Why young people are succeeding on their own terms and what schools can do to avoid being left behind. Carmarthen. Independent Thinking Press.
Lakhani, P. (2020). Inadequate. The system failing our teachers and your children. Woodbridge. John Catt Educational Ltd
Ofsted. (2021) Review of sexual abuse in schools and colleges. Available at https://www.gov.uk.government/publications/review-of-sexual-abuse-in-schools-and-colleges/review-of-sexual-abuse-in-schools-and-colleges
Ringrose, J. Regehr, K. and Milne, B. (2021) Understanding and combatting experiences of image – based sexual harassment and abuse. Available at, https://www.ASCL.org.uk/IBSHA
Times (2022) Scrap exams to help pupils to get jobs says Thatcher favourite. The Times Newspaper 4th February 2022.

GOOD PRACTICE: Leading Pastoral Care Practice from NAPCE Awards “Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care” Finalists

Celebrating Good Practice in Pastoral Care in Education.
 
NAPCE is proud to be able to highlight the excellent work that is being done in pastoral care in education.

The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE highlights the difference that is made by professionals working in pastoral roles.

This month we are recognising the excellent work that was highlighted by the contributions to the category ‘Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care’.

This award, sponsored by NAPCE, is for a person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.
 
The proud winner of this award in 2021, were Achieve NI from Belfast in Northern Ireland.

The nomination reported on how Mandy McDermott and her team at AchieveNI had made an outstanding contribution to the pastoral care at various schools and colleges throughout Northern Ireland.

They have designed and delivered many issue-based training packages on issues relating to Emotional well-being such as ‘Emotional Intelligence’, ‘Anger Management’, ‘Stress and Anxiety’ and ‘Primary School Transition’. 

They have also provided one-to-one counselling support to those young people who are navigating difficult times.

Mandy and her team at AchieveNI have made immeasurable differences in the lives of many young people spanning many years.

They carry out this work with passion, commitment, and dedication, never turning any young person away and they deserved recognition for this.

The finalists in this category included Jan Ashton from Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire. 

Jan excels as a Pastoral Leader ensuring close contact with students and families.

She maintained this in recent challenging times in some unusual and creative ways.

Jan made care packages for students feeling low, she planted trees, filled pastoral pamper hampers, wrote recognition postcards, sent letters of comfort and care for those who were bereaved and study packages for those preparing for exams.

Every single student known to her received a reminder of some sort to let them know that she was there.

Jan made sure closure, distance and virtual worlds did not mean any loss of pastoral care.

Also nominated in this category was Sarah Cockerline, from Oakfield School, Hull. 

This residential school has been Ofsted ‘Outstanding’ for 3 years in a row.  

Their knowledge and expertise in pastoral care has been shared with schools across England.

They provide each pupil with specific individualised care and support.

Pupils assist in the creation of their Individual Behaviour Education Care Plan which is aimed at developing independence, self-reliance, confidence, self-esteem, and independent living.

This year they have introduced the LEAP provision.

This is their Life Enriching Activity Programme, as an extended days offer to enhance the lives of complex pupils who attend Daily, making a real difference to the pupils in their care.

Nicola Wright, from Nidderdale High School, Pately Bridge, North Yorkshire, was nominated in this category for her work in pastoral care n the 2020-21 academic year.

Nicola completely reinvented her pastoral role during the lockdown periods to ensure that close pastoral contact was maintained daily throughout the home learning periods.

She produced an online daily newsletter called ‘Check In’ for students to share their highs and lows through photography, creative writing, artwork, news, and humour.

The Check In became a welcome daily, co-created contact shared throughout the community keeping tight the precious links between us all and ensuring outstanding pastoral contact and care continued to envelop the school.

An outstanding Nidderdale Pastoral project, shared by the LA as an example of excellence. 
  
The last finalist in this category in 2021 was Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire. 

Claire has worked for Ridgeway for over 20 years she is relentless in her commitment to young people and has impacted so many young lives positively.

Claire is one of our most valued and key staff members and selflessly dedicates her time and support every day.

Claire deserves recognition for her work, and she is appreciated by her school for everything she does for the students.

Congratulations to everybody involved in these examples of excellent pastoral care.

Do not miss your opportunity to nominate for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in education organised by NAPCE.

Making a nomination is easy and it ensures that staff supporting pastoral care are valued and get the recognition they deserve. 

You can nominate here: https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

REPORT: Chair & Secretary Reports from NAPCE 2021/22 AGM in March

Chair/Secretary Report 2021/22 
For The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

The Association through the National Executive Committee (NEC) continues to maintain strong financial management and governance.

The NEC at its meetings and through the work of its members ensures sound strategic planning and internal accountability for the activities of the Association.

The NEC ensures, (that as a non profit making charity which aims to support pastoral care in education), the work of its members, NEC and sub committees including the Editorial Board (EB) has the support needed to achieve its aims including administrative, financial, and appropriate insurance.

The National Executive has the responsibility for ensuring that the Association meets the governance expectations of the Charities Commission. The strategic priorities for the NEC this year have been.

  1. Planning events and conferences, where appropriate in partnership with other organisations to ensure that NAPCE is active in the educational world.
  2. To expand the activities of the NAPCE to enable the Association to interact with an increasing number of people with an interest in pastoral care in education.
  3. To develop the role of NAPCE as a provider of training and professional development, to share theory and good practice in pastoral care.
  4. To continue to develop the structure and organisation of the Association to meet the current and future needs of its members.
  5. To raise the profile of NAPCE and the Journal in the educational world

Once again this has not been a normal year for the Association because of the impact of the global pandemic.

Like most organisations, the pandemic and restrictions required have prevented events where people meet in person which has historically been an important part of the Associations activities, and this has brought challenges for NAPCE and a need to adapt and work in diverse ways.

The NEC identified the strategic challenges that the restrictions caused by the pandemic would bring to the Association.

  1. To be financially secure.
  2. To continue to engage and interact with people with an interest in pastoral care in education.
  3. To sustain interest in the work of NAPCE, to maintain and increase membership.
  4. To support professionals with an interest in pastoral care and explore new ways to support professionals, to ensure that the Association continues to have positive role in a changing educational world.

Although in the last two years the NEC has been prevented from organising in person events because of the pandemic, The Association has adapted to the changing situation and been successful in responding to these challenges.

The NEC and EB have developed new skills and ways of working, to support NAPCE in raising awareness about the importance of pastoral care in education.

As we can now be more optimistic about being able to organise in person events in the future the new skills and ways of working that we have developed during the pandemic will provide more options for how NAPCE engages with people who share our interest in pastoral care in the future.

The NEC continues to work closely with the EB to support their work in developing the Journal and to maintain its excellent reputation.

The Association has a positive relationship with the publishers of the journal, Taylor Francis.

They continue to be an important partner in the future development of NAPCE and by providing a regular income to provide financial stability.

The Association once again organised the ‘National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education’ and this has become an important initiative to raise awareness about NAPCE and to engage with more people who share an interest in pastoral care in education.

We are starting to see a connection between people who make nominations for the awards and then become more actively involved in NAPCE and interested in becoming members.

There were more nominations in 2021 than the previous year and they came from different regions in the United Kingdom and other parts of the world.

Awards were presented to the winners selected by the judging panel, in eight categories to recognise the achievements of people working in different areas of pastoral care in education.

The sponsors of the awards included, Inclusion Expert, The Thrive Approach, Taylor and Francis, Association of School and College Leaders, The Hult International School and BlueSky Education.

A presentation event took place online in September because of the pandemic restrictions.

This event was attended by over one hundred people, who joined the live link for the evening.

The areas represented in the United Kingdom included, Manchester, Nottingham, Antrim, Belfast, and attendees also came from Switzerland and Gabon.

Many of the nominees joined the link in groups from their own schools and it was brilliant to be able to recognise and value the examples of good practice in pastoral care that had taken place during the pandemic

A huge thank you Iain Johnson, Susana Cervera and Victoria Bownes, for the organisation of the Awards and the presentation event and a big thank you to the educationalist and author Daniel Sobel for being our guest speaker at the presentation .

  • “Thank you NAPCE for organising a great event.”
  • “So pleased to see people being valued and recognised for their contribution to pastoral care in schools.”
  • “It is brilliant to hear about all this good practice and the difference it is making. Well done everyone”
  • “Important for these Awards to recognise outstanding pastoral care. Well done to all the finalists.
  • “Well done everyone and thanks for organising such a great event.”

The nominations for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education are now open. Please encourage colleagues and contacts to visit the NAPCE website www.napce.org.uk or follow the link to make a nomination NAPCE Awards 2022 – Entry Form (wufoo.com).

Plans for a conference had to change because of the restrictions from the pandemic for organising live events.

An online conference was organised over three days in July with the title’ Does Every Child Still Matter?

A New Approach to Education.’ There was a programme of three presentations on the first day.

  • Combatting Online Sexual Harassment – Why we need RSE More Than Ever – Professor Kaitlyn Mendes, Leicester University
  • Promoting Social and Emotional Well-Being. Lee Pritchard, Head of UK Development, The Thrive Approach.
  • Pastoral Care post COVID – Connor Acton

On the evening of the second day there was a ‘Pastoral Question Time ‘, with an invited panel to answer questions from delegates.
Chaired by Phil Jones – Chair of NAPCE

On the panel

  • Dr Noel Purdy – Deputy Editor of Pastoral Care in Education.
  • Margaret Mulholland ASCL SEND and Inclusion Specialist
  • Nigel Murray – Paralympic Gold Medallist.
  • Mark Diacopoulos, Assistant Professor, Pittsburgh State University,
  • Daniel Sobel, Author and Founder of ‘Inclusion Expert’
  • Michelle de Middelaer, Educational Consultant, Learning Through Leadership

On the final day of the conference there were three more presentations.

  • Building Positive Relationships for Learning – Helen Peter
  • Proactive Pastoral Care – Maria O Neil, Author and Founder UK Pastoral Chat
  • Engaging Learners – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

All the available tickets for links for this free event were ‘sold out,’ with over a hundred delegates attending over the three days.

The event was an important opportunity to maintain the contact with people who are interested in the work of NAPCE, and it attracted 832 visits to the event page on NAPCE’s Eventbrite site.

The Conference was attended by delegates from the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.

NAPCE is planning another online conference for 2022 with the title, ‘How can effective pastoral care support learners and prepare them for their future roles in society’?

Once again, the Conference will take place over three days with presentations on day one and day three and a Pastoral Question Time on the evening of day two.

Details can be found on the NAPCE Eventbrite page at https://napce2022.eventbrite.co.uk. and tickets can be reserved at https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

Links for this conference are limited so please encourage colleagues and contacts to book tickets early to avoid being disappointed as this event in 2021 was sold out.

This is an anniversary year for the Association.

It was 40 years ago this year since the Association was first formed and its members started working on the first publication of the journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’.

A weekend of events is planned in October to celebrate the anniversary.

These include an anniversary dinner at the lovely setting of Worcestershire Cricket Ground in Worcester with views of the Cathedral and Severn River.

There will be a reception on arrival, a three-course dinner and a bar available until 11-00pm.

We are pleased that Les Walton OBE, has agreed to be our after-dinner speaker.

He has recently published his book ‘Education the Rock and Roll years.

A Northern perspective on a lifetime of learning, teaching and leading where he shares his experiences from his career in education.

A chapter in the book is devoted to NAPCE, and he explains his involvement in creating Gateshead Pastoral Care Association in 1981 and how Michael Marland approached him, a nationally renowned headteacher, who along with other leading educationalists wanted to establish a National Association.

This became the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education in 1982.

This is going to be an important evening for everybody who has been involved in the history of NAPCE or who has an interest in pastoral care and one not to be missed.

Tickets will be available to NAPCE members at a reduced cost and tickets will be available soon.

Other activities that are planned for the anniversary year include.

  • A special edition of the journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ with guest writers exploring the challenges facing pastoral care in education today and ideas about how pastoral care in education should develop in the next 40 years.
  • A two-day conference at the Anniversary weekend at Worcestershire County Cricket Ground, in Worcester, with the title, ‘Is there a need for a new direction for pastoral care in education’? Leading educationalists and experts in research, policy making and good practice in pastoral care in education will be speaking and delegates will be offered workshops to develop their understanding of current issues.
  • A live presentation event for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education as part of the anniversary weekend of events at Worcestershire County Cricket Ground in Worcester.
  • A new NAPCE book about pastoral care in education published by Cambridge Scholars.

The Association continues to form partnerships with organisations with similar interest and values.

The Association was once again actively involved in the planning and delivery of the Association of School and College Leaders, (ASCL) annual conference for Pastoral Leaders in January.

Once again, this year it was an online event and NAPCE contributed with Chair Phil Jones being invited onto the panel to answer questions from delegates.

This was an excellent opportunity to raise the profile of NAPCE, with delegates in leadership roles in primary and secondary schools, attending the conference, from all around the country.

NAPCE was once again invited to contribute to the planning of Safer Internet Day and was a registered supporter of the event.

This is an annual event involving schools and organisations from across the country.

As Chair of NAPCE, Phil was invited to attend the online event in February, that was streamed live from the top of the BT tower in London.

It is good to see NAPCE taking an active role in educational events and activities and that other educational organisation are now approaching NAPCE to ask for our support and contributions to important educational events.

The NEC have continued to take positive action to enable the Association to interact more effectively with other people who share an interest in education and the contribution that pastoral care can make to the learning experience of children and young people.

The Association is pleased to continue working with Iain Johnson from Noise PR.

Iain is managing our social media and supporting the Association with its publicity and marketing.

Iain has made a huge contribution to raising awareness about the work of NAPCE and is making a real impact in helping us to achieve our aim of interacting with more people who share our interest in pastoral care.

The impact of his support can be seen in increased followers on social media and people contacting NAPCE.

Iain produces a monthly newsletter for the Association, which has seen a growing number of people requesting a copy and an increase in the number of people opening and reading the newsletter each month.

The newsletter has published a wide range of articles on pastoral care, written by guest educationalists from other educational organisations as well as contributions from members of the NEC.

The newsletter has become a valuable resource for the latest thinking and sharing of ideas about pastoral care in education and ensures that members and supporters of NAPCE are kept up to date with current information about pastoral care and news about NAPCE events and activities.

This increased interaction has seen more interest, in membership of the Association and there has been an increase in the number of members and subscribers to the journal.

This demonstrates that the work to increase awareness about the work of NAPCE is having an impact.

The Association continues to work with Taylor and Francis to develop the Association’s website.

The Association’s Twitter feed on the website provides the latest news and information and there are links to planned events and activities.

This ensures that the Association is providing its members with current news from the world of education and information to support them in their pastoral roles.

The increased contact with the Association through the website, social media and contact with NAPCE’s administration has continued this year.

NAPCE administration has seen a significant increase in contact by email and telephone which demonstrates how NAPCE has raised its profile and is seen as being important in encouraging awareness about the important contribution pastoral care can make to education.

There have been requests for advice and guidance on a wide range of pastoral issues that members of the NEC have responded to.

Contacts have been about advice on good practice in pastoral care and guidance about the roles of pastoral leaders, pastoral staff, and designated safeguarding leads.

NAPCE through its Twitter page provides support and inspiration for developing good practice in pastoral care.

One area explored on NAPCE’s Twitter page this year was The 25 Reasons Why Pastoral Care is Important in 2022’ which is an example of how NAPCE is stimulating discussion and ideas about good practice.

As the engagement with NAPCE and the interest in our activities continues to increase, the NEC has increased the capacity to provide administrative support.

Anne who looks after communications and Susana who looks after meetings and events in the NAPCE Administrative team have taken on a shared responsibility for Finance after Mel made the decision to step down from this role.

Mel had been the administrator since 2008 and served the Association with dedication and commitment over the past 13 years.

On behalf of the Association we would like to record our appreciation to her and send out very best wishes for the future.

Members of NEC this year have contributed their energy, skills, and expertise to the Association to enable it to continue to expand its activities for its members and raise its profile in the educational world despite the challenges that we have faced because of the pandemic.

The NEC welcomes suggestions about how to raise awareness of the work of NAPCE, and any suggestions about how our members can contribute to discussions about future developments in policy and practice in Pastoral Care and participate in activities to raise awareness about prominent issues in this area of education.

NAPCE is a charity and decisions are made by members who serve on committees on behalf of other members in the best interest of achieving the aims of the Association.

This ensures that the Association can demonstrate to the Charity Commission and others, good governance and ensures that as members, the people making decisions on behalf of the Association are covered by NAPCE’s insurance.

All members are contributing to Association finances, as subscriptions are managed by Taylor and Francis but the funding it generates is returned to NAPCE to support our work.

This has always been good practice that members make decisions on behalf of the membership, and this will be clarified in a proposed amendment to the constitution at the AGM.

Thank you to all members of the National Executive Committee, Editorial Board, Melissa O’Grady, NAPCE Financial Administrator, Anne Jones, Communication Administrator, Susana Cervera, Meetings and Events Administrator, Iain Johnson at Noise PR, Lyndsey Upex, at the Pastoral Care in Education Editorial Office and Abi Amey and her colleagues at Taylor and Francis, for your support, contributions, energy, and ideas this year.

Following the challenging work over the last few years, NAPCE has raised its profile in the educational world and established the foundations to enable it to make a significant contribution to encouraging positive approaches to pastoral care in the future.

We look forward to having the opportunity to meet people in person again who share our interest in the difference effective pastoral care can make in the education and lives of children and young people in this important year for the Association.

Phil Jones, Chair, NAPCE
Jill Robson, Secretary, NAPCE 
                                                                                             

CONFERENCE: FREE Tickets Available Now for NAPCE Online Spring Conference 2022

Online Spring Conference 2022

‘How can effective pastoral care support learners and prepare them for their future roles in society’?

FREE Online Conference over three days 

Tickets are going fast for the free online conference being organised by NAPCE in June 2022.

With a brilliant line up of expert speakers and a great Question Time panel this is the conference for everybody who is interested in pastoral care in education and the difference it can make to a young person’s learning experience and life chances.

Last year’s conference sold out a month before the event, so go to Eventbrite today to register for your tickets.

PROGRAMME
Wednesday 15 June
2-00pm Welcome to the Conference – Phil Jones, Chair of NAPCE
2-10pm Presentation 1– The School Response to Online Sexual Harassment and Abuse., Professor Kaitlyn Mendes, University of western Ontario Canada.
2-40pm Questions
2-45pm Presentation 2 – Developing Effective Supervision for Safeguarding, Carl Elder, Educational Consultant
3-15pm Questions
3-20pm Presentation 3 – The Rock and Roll Years for Education and the Lessons for Pastoral Care, LesWalton, CBE, Educationalist and Author
3-50pm Questions
3-55pm Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Thursday 16th June

7-00pm to 8-00pm NAPCE QUESTION TIME – How can pastoral care and support in schools enable young people to achieve their full potential? 
Chaired by Phil Jones – Chair of NAPCE
Invited onto panel,
Dr Noel Purdy– Deputy Editor of Pastoral Care in Education.
Maria O’Neill – Author ‘Proactive Pastoral Care
Dr Mark Diacoupolos, Assistant Professor, Department of Teaching and Leadership, Pittsburg State University. USA
Charlie Walker, Student member of NAPCE National Executive.
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London.
Dr Helen O’Connor, St Swithins’ School Psychologist.

Friday 17th June 
10-00am Welcome – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE
10-10am Presentation 4 – Using data to Create a Proactive Pastoral Strategy, Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
10-40am Questions
10-45am Presentation 5 – Lessons from Pastoral Care in a Special School, Nadine Huseyin, Family Support, Pastoral and Safeguarding lead, the Grove School Tottenham
11-15am Questions
11-20am Presentation 6 – Wellbeing – Early Intervention Made Easy, Alex Kyriacou, Director, UOK Wellbeing
11-50am Questions
11-55am Close – Phil Jones Chair of NAPCE

Follow the link to book your FREE tickets https://napce-june-conference-22.eventbrite.co.uk

The links for each event in the Conference will be sent to people who have registered for tickets in June. 

INVITATION: How to Attend NAPCE’s AGM on March 26th, 2022

The 2022 AGM for the Association takes place on Saturday 26th March and after two years when it was not possible because of pandemic restrictions this year it will be an ‘in person’, event.

The AGM will take place in Worcester against the background of the Cathedral at Worcestershire County Cricket Ground.

All members are invited to attend the AGM and are entitled to participate in discussions and to vote.

The AGM will be an opportunity to find out more about the Association’s activities in the last year and the plans for the anniversary year and in the future.

It is hoped that the venue will be able to provide an opportunity for members to join the AGM remotely online.

Please email events@napce.org.uk if you would like to attend the AGM to enable arrangements to be made for the refreshments.

If you would be interested in joining the event online, please email events@napce.org.uk and ask for the link details to be sent to you.

Although you will only be able to participate in the AGM and vote if you are a current member of NAPCE, you are welcome to attend as an observer by emailing events@napce.org.uk

The agenda and other arrangements are below.

Annual General Meeting 2021
Saturday 26th March 2021
12.30-13.30 hours
In Room View 3
Worcestershire County Cricket Club
County Ground, New Road, Worcester. WR2 4QQ

AGENDA

  1. Welcome to members
  2. Apologies for absence
  3. Minutes of 2021 AGM
  4. Matters arising
  5. Resolutions from the 2021 AGM
  6. Reports – Chair/Secretary/Treasurer/Journal Editor
  7. Report on NEC elections
  8. New resolutions from the 2022 AGM
  9. Amendments to the constitution
  10. Any Other Business

 

CELEBRATION DINNER: Join us to Celebrate NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary

You are invited to the Anniversary dinner to celebrate the 40 years since NAPCE was formed.

It will be an opportunity to meet with other people who have contributed to the history of NAPCE and to celebrate the difference it has made for raising awareness about pastoral care in education and the difference it makes to the learning experience for children and young people and supports their personal development to prepare them for their future lives in society.

This event will take place at the Worcestershire Cricket Ground, overlooking the Severn River and cathedral in Worcester.

It takes place on Saturday 8th October as part of a weekend of events to celebrate the anniversary which include a two-day conference and the presentation for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022.

The event is open to members and non-members.

Availability is limited and you are advised to reserve your ticket early to avoid disappointment.

Tickets can be reserved by visiting https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/napce-40th-anniversary-dinner-tickets-299335118397

Tickets will be available on Eventbrite from Monday 28th March, 2022.

The programme for the evening is,

7-00pm Guests Arrive – Prosecco Welcome Reception.
7-30pm Three Course Anniversary Dinner.

Dinner menu

  1. Starter                       
  2. Cream of Leek, Potato and Watercress Soup, Croutons (V) (GF)
  3. Main course             
  4. Roasted Chicken Supreme, Gratin Potato, and Red Wine Gravy (GF
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Vegetarian/Vegan Gluten Free option 

  1. Starter
  2. Leek, Sweet Potato and Spinach Soup (GF)
  3. Main course
  4. Butternut Squash, Sweet Potato and Roasted Red Peppers, Parsley and Dill Sauce with Tender Stem Broccoli (GF)
  5. Dessert
  6. White Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake (V)

Please advise in advance of the evening if you would prefer the vegetarian option or if you have any additional dietary requirements.

8-30pm After Dinner Speaker – Les Walton CBE

Les as he explains in his recently published book ’Education the Rock and Roll Years. A Northern Perspective on A lifetime of learning Teaching and Leading’, was one of the leading educationalists involved in the forming of NAPCE in 1982.

As the title of the book suggests, Les has a wide experience of education in recent history that he will share with guests at the dinner.

9-30 pm Pay bar available until 11-00 pm to meet old friends and make new friends. Please note this is a cashless venue.

The cost of the Anniversary Dinner is £35.00 for full members of NAPCE, £40.00 for Associate members and £45.00 for non- members.

Please dress to impress.

Please note that tickets will not be refunded unless the event is cancelled by the Association for reasons beyond its control when a full refund will be made.

There are direct train services from London to Worcester Foregate Station which is a ten-minute walk or short taxi ride from the venue.

Cross country trains call at the new Worcestershire Parkway, which has connections to Foregate Street. There is parking available at the venue and at public car parks nearby.

The venue has a Premier Inn Hotel on the site and there is a good choice of other options for accommodation in the city of Worcester.

Please book your tickets early to ensure that you do not miss this important event in NAPCE’s history to celebrate the contribution it has made to education in the last 40 years.

If you have any questions about the event, please contact NAPCE administration at admin@napce.co.uk

 

40th ANNIVERSARY: Weekend Conference Details Released to Mark Four Decades of NAPCE

We are very proud to reveal details of the weekend conference to mark NAPCE’s 40th Anniversary in October.

Further details are being added in the coming weeks.

Dates for the Diary

The 40th Anniversary Conference and Events Weekend – October 2022

Venue
Worcestershire County Cricket Club
County Ground
New Road
Worcester
WR2 4QQ

Friday 7th October

Conference Day One

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Research and Policy making.

Confirmed Speakers

Dr Noel Purdy – Director of Research and Scholarship at Stranmillis University College, Belfast, and Deputy Editor of ‘Pastoral Care in Education’
Maria O Neil – Educationalist and author of ‘Proactive Pastoral Care’
Professor Helen Cowie – University of Surrey

Invited and waiting for confirmation 

The Rt Hon Nadim Zahawi, Secretary of State for Education
Ofsted
Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Saturday 8th October 

Conference Day Two

‘Is There a Need for a New Direction for Pastoral Care in Education’? –  Good Practice.
Daniel Sobel – Educationalist, author and founder and CEO of Inclusion Expert
Ron Skelton – Headteacher and CEO of Broadway School, Perry Barr, Birmingham
Dr Helen O Connor – Psychologist at St Swithun’s School in Winchester
Invited and to be confirmed
Mrs Heather Hansbury, President, Girls School Association

Workshops include:

Jill Robson – NAPCE National Secretary – Effective PSHE

Full programme and other speakers to be confirmed

Tickets: https://napce2022.eventbrite.co.uk/

Reduced price tickets will be available for NAPCE members, and a reduced-price ticket will be available for both days of the conference.

Other Events planned for the Anniversary weekend in Worcester include 

Friday 7th October 7-00pm
Presentation Event for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 is Now Open

We are delighted to launch the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards takes place in our 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – November 2021

NAPCE News – November 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  “Student Voice and Care During Covid-19” by NAPCE NEC Member Luke Myer

Student voice and care during COVID-19 by Luke Myer

It’s clear that the pandemic has highlighted and exacerbated inequalities in education. But, in many ways, it has also brought educational communities closer together – reducing attainment gaps and putting learners and staff in a shared, albeit unprecedented, situation. Care has never been so important.

The latest special issue of NAPCE’s Pastoral Care in Education explored the importance of care in the time of COVID-19; it hopped around the globe, with case studies from New Zealand to Guatemala. It studied every level of education – from a feminist view of pastoral care for young children in Spain to the experiences of disabled students in UK universities. One contribution, from an Indigenous Moana/Pacific perspective, explored the idea of ‘teu le vā’, or nurturing the relational space between people, and what that looks like during the pandemic – the ‘digital va/vā’.[1] At its core, care is about understanding the needs of others and helping meet them. The most important voices in pastoral care, therefore, are those of learners themselves. Pastoral care at its most effective offers learners space to talk; this is as true in early years as it is with postgraduate students.

Student voice has increasingly become established in school life; it’s difficult to visit a primary or secondary school without seeing a display board celebrating a student council or prefect system. In higher education, ‘student engagement’ is a core feature, embedded in the UK Quality Code.[2] It’s a legal requirement for UK universities to have independent, democratic students’ unions, enshrined in the 1994 Education Act. Empowering students to speak and involving them in decision-making brings shared benefits in terms of better academic outcomes and continuous improvement of pedagogy. But it also brings benefits for students themselves – increased resilience, sense of belonging, civic participation, and trust.[3],[4] The Anna Freud Centre reports that schools with a strong commitment to student voice see better behaviour, reductions in exclusions, and improved attainment.

However, in the pandemic, opportunities for student voice have been limited. With online learning, disruptive lockdowns, and frequent pupil self-isolations, teachers have struggled to deliver learning at its most basic.

“We’ve had a huge influx in pupils losing social skills, being anxious around others, and struggling to stay in lesson,” one secondary teacher in Cheshire told me. “We have so many kids now on half timetables to help deal with it.”

A similar view was shared by a head of department at a north London secondary school.

“On top of poor social skills from missing so much school, we had a flood of problems when students returned – things that had gone on at home or on social media. It was exhausting. We weren’t expecting it, nor were we provided with the resources to deal with it effectively.”

2021 UNESCO survey of secondary teachers across Europe, the Middle East and North Africa found that during the pandemic, ‘the vast majority of young people, regardless of whether they live in Europe or MENA, lost out on opportunities to have their voice heard’. So, what does student voice look like in the ‘digital va/vā’? Can it be delivered? And how does it impact on pastoral care?

“The reliance on digital technology has gone up,” the head of department tells me. “But this is a good thing because I can easily communicate and share with my groups. There are still boundary issues to resolve, for example if I get an email on a Sunday night from a student. But I think the emergence of tools like Google Classrooms has been really good.”

In the initial lockdown in spring 2020, case studies published by the QAA showed universities like Robert Gordon and Harper Adams had been carrying out online pulse surveys of students’ experiences in online learning environments. Robert Gordon University’s Enhancement of Learning, Teaching and Access department (DELTA) gathered feedback which identified technological and social barriers to learning. These were then included in students’ extenuating circumstances, and a programme of free online industry-focused short courses were developed to address skills needs.

In Liverpool, mass online feedback from secondary school students during the pandemic has begun informing new mental health strategies. Eighty-five local schools took part in the 2021 OxWell Student Survey, an annual online study that asks students aged 9-18 about wellbeing and mental health. Over 11,600 young people across the city took part, sharing thoughts on their wellbeing at school during the pandemic. Liverpool City Council’s Education, Employment & Skills team have begun using the feedback to work with schools on new programmes like Forest Schools and peer-to-peer playground support. The exercise will result in close collaboration between schools, including joint training to tackle children’s low-level mental health needs.

These surveys show how the insights of learners can bring an invaluable perspective, shaping what we do when it comes to pastoral care. But student voice can go deeper than this too. The language in the Quality Code I mentioned earlier reads:

The provider actively engages students, individually and collectively, in the quality of their educational experience.

In practice, this means that meaningful student voice systems allow students to shape their education in partnership with staff. They can do so ‘collectively’, in spaces where they can consider, deliberate and develop their own informed views together. They can also do so ‘individually’ – with staff differentiating their teaching and learning based on the student’s own views. Learning is, after all, a two-way street – it’s not simply done ‘to’ students, but with the effort they put in too. So, when students have the opportunity to actively shape their learning, schools create a partnership model which can drive high-quality education.

The advance of technology in education can help. UNESCO’s Europe-MENA survey found that after the pandemic, 87% of teachers were using social media to stay connected with students.[5] They also reported a 19% increase in teachers using digital student voice methods, with 54% doing so in “most” or “all” lessons.

The case studies cited range from student-led films about pupil experiences in Greece and Tunisia, to interactive online seminars with leading community members in Romania. In the Greek example, school pupils used social media groups and online meetings to share their feelings about learning from home. This was coupled with lessons on film-making skills, and the end result was a collaborative video project which received international recognition.

In the UK, most universities involved student representatives directly in their COVID planning; examples range from the Highlands and Islands Students’ Association to Cardiff Metropolitan University. Students’ union elected officers typically attended university committees by Zoom, including strategic and operational decision-making meetings. Many held daily or weekly Student Voice sessions to collate student concerns from social media and email, and identify patterns to feed back to the university. The University of Bath students’ union created a Facebook ‘Corona Community’ with nearly 4000+ students, and coupled it with Microsoft Teams sites for communicating with specific groups, for example international students. The union was able to capture detailed data on students’ engagement with online learning.

The north London school has used Google Classrooms to develop pupil-driven PSHE. “My school have started doing ‘MyZone’,” the department head told me. “It’s an hour a week dedicated to student-led discussion of social issues like mental health and digital communication skills. The students have shaped what we do – we talk about the things that they want to discuss, and giving them that control means they turn up and engage.”

A similar initiative was introduced in the Cheshire school. “Every Wednesday, period one, we have a ‘Spirit’ hour,” explained the teacher. “It’s based on the PSHE curriculum, but through lockdown we adapted it based on what kids were asking to give them an insight into the NHS, infections, and so on.”

A whole-school approach to pastoral care means listening to everyone’s voices, and learners themselves are as important as anyone. When schools involve them in their decision-making, it drives positive change and improved outcomes, as well as individual empowerment and confidence-building. It takes effort – it’s not a one-off exercise, but a continuous cycle of improvement. It takes time to bed in, and to ensure that it’s inclusive of all students rather than the ones most likely to get involved. But it’s worth it.

The pandemic has been a painful, disruptive time for education, but it can also be an opportunity for change. If schools embrace digital tools for student voice, they can show students that their views are valued, that it is safe to share, and that they will be heard. In turn, we’ll all benefit – in school and in wider society.

Luke Myer
National Executive Committee
NAPCE


[1] Baice, T., Fonua, S.M., Levy, B., Allen, J.M. and Wright, T. (2021). How do you (demonstrate) care in an institution that does not define “care”?. Pastoral Care in Education, 39(3), pp.250–268.
[2] Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) (2018) UK Quality Code for Higher Education. Gloucester: QAA.
[3] Lyndon, H. (2020) ‘Listening to Children’ in Williams- Brown, Z. and Mander, S.Eds. ‘Childhood Well-being and Resilience: influences on educational outcomes’. Abingdon: Routledge.
[4] Fielding, M. (2004) “New Wave” Student Voice and the Renewal of Civic Society. London Review of Education, 2, 197-217.
[5] UNESCO (2021) The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on student voice: Findings and recommendations. Paris: UNESCO. p.18

GOOD PRACTICE: Outstanding Pastoral Care Practice from NAPCE Awards “Team of the Year” Finalists

The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE were a opportunity to recognise the brilliant work that has been done in pastoral care.

It is a great opportunity to shine a light on the amazing efforts to support learners and the good practice that is taking place in schools across the UK and internationally.

This month we focus on the category for the Pastoral Team of the Year which is sponsored by the Thrive Approach to share some good practice from the finalists and winner.

This award goes to a team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

The Winners of this award in 2021 were All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire. 

The pastoral team have worked tirelessly to help provide an education for some of our most vulnerable children.

From visiting children during lockdown, to providing a provision that starts as soon as the children get into school and finishes when they leave.

The team have sourced breakfasts for the entire school, offer bespoke behaviour interventions throughout the day and also support our families when in need.

The pastoral team also offer support for the rest of our colleagues, supplying training, advice and interventions when needed.

We are about to go the entire school year with zero fixed-term or permanent exclusions, something the school has never achieved before. This is down to our fantastic pastoral team.

The finalists for this category shared this excellent practice with the judges.

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

The team supports the wellbeing of our autistic pupils across the school and beyond within the borough.

They lead on initiatives such as PBS and developing valuable life skills including social skills and independence.

Their work focuses on helping our autistic learners to understand their emotions and regulate themselves appropriately.

The team works with families through home visits and family support to ensure the work in school is continued at home.

Success through lockdown was a 96% engagement from families and in school through negative incidents decreasing dramatically and positive records increasing by over 200%.
.
Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland.

Team = Vice Principal, SENCO, 2 Heads of Key Stage and 6 Heads of Year. Team members have attended training in mental health first aid, suicide prevention, ACEs and neglect.

Focus on restorative practice, building relationships and engaging with parents. Surveys used during lockdown to identify pupils struggling and all received phone calls/virtual meetings.

Delivery of personal development programmes with a focus on 5 Ways to Wellbeing and core values. Every external agency meeting is attended. Provision of safe spaces and bespoke support packages.

Team focus on pupil voice which is a School Development Plan priority. RESTORE programme after lockdown.

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire.

Nidderdale High School Pastoral Team are nominated for their strength and togetherness and for the support they continually offer to every young person in the school, their families and carers.

They have a reputation for resolving complex and difficult cases, often using the environment of the Nidderdale countryside to find bespoke ways of working whilst additionally promoting good mental health and wellbeing.

The Pastoral Team has ensured that every young person felt supported, listened to and noticed throughout the periods of closure and uncertainty.

They have remained contactable, approachable, inclusive and strong, promoting a constant culture of kindness and care.

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire.

The pastoral team at BCS put our children at the heart of everything they do. Well-being, emotional health, safety, friendships, parental support and supporting children with SEND.

They’ve worked tirelessly through COVID and are now helping children get back into normal routines. School is a safer, happier and more nurturing place because of this team of absolute heroes.

They’re amazing and our students, staff and parents are lucky to have these people in their lives. Thank you.

Have a look at this link to see how our finalists celebrated as the winners were announced at the Presentation Ceremony.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1441318847152230402

The 2022 National Awards for pastoral care are about to be launched and to find out how you can make nominations to recognise good practice in pastoral care in education follow NAPCE on Twitter @NAPCE1 and look out for details in future editions of the NAPCE newsletter and on the website www.napce.org.uk

ANTI-BULLYING WEEK: A New Book by NAPCE Editorial Board Member Helen Cowie Raises Awareness of Bullying

Anti-bullying week 2021 – A School For Everyone: Stories and Lesson Plans to Teach Inclusivity and Social Issues

Anti-bullying Week, coordinated by the Anti-Bullying Alliance, is an annual event empowering everyone to unite against bullying. “One Kind Word,” the theme of Anti-Bullying Week 2021, which runs from 15th – 19th November, focuses on how little acts of kindness can make a huge impact and how we should all respect each other’s differences.

“A SCHOOL FOR EVERYONE: Stories and Lesson Plans to Teach Inclusivity and Social Issues” is a research-informed empathy-building discussion tool for educators that shares this anti-bullying message, encouraging respect for individuality and showing young people how they can make a difference.

By increasing knowledge and understanding of a wide range of social and emotional issues, the book promotes acceptance and celebration of diversity in the school environment so that all classmates feel valued and included.

The compendium provides 16 stories told from the different perspectives of individual children from one class over the course of three terms.

Each chapter opens with discussions about tricky topics including gender diversity, bereavement, disability, body image, frenemies, cyber-bullying, parental divorce, living in poverty, and climate change, to help children develop empathy for their peers.

Shared reading of a story gives each child insight into the inner thoughts of a character who is experiencing distressing emotions.

Alongside classmates who are facing these difficult issues, we also meet Jakub who is from Poland, Molly who is not a stereotypical girl, Oliver who is on the autism spectrum, Jamie whose dad is in prison, Hind who is a refugee, Margaret who is from a gypsy family, and Michael who learns about important Black Britons. By reading their stories, young people start to imagine what it feels like to be one of them.

For each issue raised, the story is followed by a fact file, a set of interactive activities, lesson plans and a bank of resources to further enhance understanding and promote empathy.

Research suggests that interacting with peers and guiding children’s learning can help children learn more than working on their own.

The activities are designed for children to work together to support their learning. In the group setting, minds meet and beliefs can be discussed within a supportive environment.

Bystanders can reflect on the positive impact of just one kind word. Marginalised children can gain hope that there are solutions to difficult situations. Children who bully can see the effect of negative behaviour on the character in the story.

There are several characteristics typical of children exhibiting bullying behaviours – and a lack of empathy for the distress that their actions cause is a key characteristic. One way to increase empathy is through real or “imagined” contact. Research studies have found that when people from different groups make contact with each other, prejudice is reduced and relations are improved.

However, there are two ways in which this contact is difficult.

First, reduction of prejudice can only work when there is an opportunity for contact. Some schools may have low levels of diversity so that children do not have the opportunity to interact with people who are different from themselves. Second, sometimes people become anxious about interacting with someone who is different from themselves, preventing contact from reducing prejudice.

This is another reason why the concept of imaginary contact becomes so important. Imagined contact can reduce children’s future anxiety about meeting people different from themselves.

Reading stories about people who are different and leading children to imagine interacting with them – imaginary contact – can be a powerful force for change.

Researchers have found that imagining an intergroup interaction can have many of the same effects as actually participating in intergroup contact.

The first-person stories and activities in “A School for Everyone” aim to create contact, leading to more compassionate and inclusive classrooms, where diversity is celebrated. Just as one kind word can lead to another, our hope is that “A School for Everyone” can make a difference.

https://uk.jkp.com/products/a-school-for-everyone

Helen Cowie
Editorial Board Member
NAPCE

MEMBERSHIP: Renewals for NAPCE 2022 Membership Are Being Sent Out

2022 Membership Renewals – NAPCE

Invitations are being sent out to NAPCE members to renew your membership for 2022.

Next year it will be 40 years since the National Association for Pastoral Care was formed and the academic journal Pastoral Care in Education was published.

Special events including a weekend conference and Anniversary Dinner are planned to celebrate the 40 years that NAPCE has been supporting education.

Members will have priority for bookings so to make sure that you are fully involved in the Association’s special year renew your membership early and get the full benefits of being a member of NAPCE.

If you have shown your interest in the work of NAPCE by registering for the newsletter or following NAPCE on social media, then now is the time to become a member in time for the anniversary year.

The National Executive have made the decision to NOT INCREASE THE PRICE OF MEMBERSHIP for 2022 and full membership includes a subscription for four copies of the academic journal to be delivered to your home address.

Taylor and Francis publishers manage the membership subscriptions on behalf of NAPCE and their contact details are T&F Customer Services, Sheepen Place, Colchester, CO3 3LP, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7017 5543 . Fax: +44 (0) 20 7017 5198 . Email: societies@tandf.co.uk. Contact Taylor and Francis to find out about the different ways that you can pay your subscription.

APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP –  Individual and Group memberships include a subscription to Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development (PCE) Published by Routledge

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP including one copy of PCE Individual Subscription Rate £44 US$88 €57 NQT/Retired/Student Individual Rate £21 US$40 €33

GROUP MEMBERSHIP including two copies of PCE Group Subscription rate £66 US$132 €86 Primary/Special School Rate £43

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP society membership only – does not include PCE subscription. Associate Subscription rate £10 US$16 €30

Follow this link to apply for membership RPED_NAPCEmembership-New.pdf (netdna-ssl.com) or go to Apply Online – NAPCE to apply for membership online.

AWARDS: Entry for the NAPCE Awards 2022 is Now Open

We are delighted to launch the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 organised by NAPCE.

The third annual NAPCE awards will be in the 40th anniversary year for the Association and we are inviting everybody with a pastoral role or an interest in how pastoral care in education can support children and young people to achieve their full potential.

We are looking for the people, teams and organisations that make a real difference in the learning experience of children and young people and want to recognise their achievements and celebrate their good practice.

The categories for the awards this year are:-

Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

International Contribution to Pastoral Care
An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.
 
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

The maximum number of words to support a nomination is being increased from 100 words to 300 words this year so there will be every opportunity to describe the good practice and the impact it is making.

Nominations can be made for excellent contributions to research, for raising awareness and for good practice in pastoral care in education from the 2021 -2022 academic year. The sponsors and panel of judges will be announced shortly.

The closing date for nominations is 30th May 2022 and the judges will then have the difficult task of deciding who the finalists and winners will be in each category.

A grand live presentation event is planned for the anniversary year in the autumn to announce the winners.

All finalists will receive a certificate form NAPCE to recognise their achievements and winners will receive a plaque and a £100.00 cash prize.

Make sure your good practice is recognised by making a nomination today.
 
To make a nomination for the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE go to https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/napce-awards-2022-entry-form/

NAPCE News – October 2021

NAPCE News – October 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE:  NAPCE NEC Member & Pastoral Care Leader Connor Acton Explores the Importance of Parent/Carer Communication

Parent/carer communication is easy to get right, painful when you get it wrong and downright disastrous if it goes really wrong.

It’s sometimes easy to forget that when we speak to parents, or communicate via other means, that the person on the other end of the line is also a living, breathing human with their own worries and concerns as well as their own day job or personal life to manage.

It’s also easy to forget how you desire to be spoken to when you are ringing a parent, late on a Friday, after a long day at work.

You want to get your point across, tell the parent what their child has done wrong, alongside any sanction, and get out of there as quickly as possible.

Unfortunately, in doing so, you set yourself up to fail and the building blocks for a poor parental relationship begin to stack on top of each other.

You’ll soon realise that once the blocks have started to stack, each conversation you have results in them stacking faster, to the point you dread ringing them at all because you know how the conversation will go.

In reality there really aren’t many occasions where a parental phone call should be challenging – a difficult conversation may need to be had but that doesn’t mean that it needs to be one which results in either party leaving it and feeling like they’ve done twelve rounds with Mike Tyson.

As a Pastoral Leader I can’t begin to think of how many phone calls I’ve made during my career, more than some call centres I’m sure, and I certainly can’t begin to imagine all of the many reasons for doing so.

That being said there have been some incredibly difficult conversations to be had; there have been times I have had to recommend we end a conversation and pick it up later; times when the 5-minute phone call becomes 30mins-1hr of trying to resolve a multitude of issues; times when I’ve hung up and had to call social services or the police.

You never know where a phone call home, or a chat on the gate, or any other method of communication might take you.

You should know, however, that there are some really simple things you can do to make sure that parental communication/relationships needn’t be painful.

Parental communication, and by extension co-operation, is one of the biggest keys to your success as a mentor, TA, Teacher, Pastoral Leader etc.

Most parents will want to work with you to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be – almost all parents will want to ensure their child’s school life is the best it can possibly be but may not want to work with you!

Courtesy and respect go a long way in building strong working relationships with parents – the vast majority of your communications with parents will likely be by phone.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve sat with a member of staff who starts a phone call to a parent with “Hello, it’s Mr X from school, John was a nightmare in his DT lesson today”.

Those kinds of opening messages get most parent’s backs up straight away. Introduce yourself, start by asking them if they are alright, if they have a couple of minutes to talk and you’ll often find they are much more willing to engage with you.

That’s not always the case but if you’ve taken the time to be respectful at the start of the conversation you will have at least set the table for a polite conversation.

Think about how you feel when the insurance salesman rings at 4pm, after a long day, and asks you if you’ve got some time to talk – I’m certainly not comparing us to cold callers but for some parents the feeling is the same!

Try and ensure that your first communication with a parent isn’t a negative one wherever possible – when we take over a class/group, or first start working with a child, we generally know where we might expect problems.

Get early conversations in with their parents by spotting praise where possible within the first few interactions you have with their child – this will make it easier for you to call later on if you need to ring for less positive reasons.

There are a huge number of parents who dread seeing the school number on their phone – how many times have you had a parent/carer answer with “What’s she done now?”.

For some of our communities the thought of a telling off from school brings back negative memories of their own and this is always something to be cognizant of.

Even if you can’t see any opportunities for praise you can still call and introduce yourself in situations where you feel it may be beneficial – if you take over a class, for example, that you know have been historically poorly behaved there’s no harm in ringing some parents of key students to introduce yourself, acknowledge the issues from the past and then let them know you are going to be working to move things forward.

You may even find that a parent/carer has suggestions/advice to offer that could be valuable for you, having never worked with their child before.

Praise phone calls, postcards, emails etc. will always be a great way to endear yourself to most parents/carers and you should endeavour to do this as much as you reasonably can.

I’ve always been a fan of the ‘Friday Five’ approach – making five positive phonecalls on a Friday – to end the week on a high and make five children’s (and their parent’s) weekends.

Keep any reporting of behaviour as factual and clear as possible and, if you need to, think beforehand about the message you wish to convey.

It can be hard for a parent to hear a statement like “Harry was incredibly rude, and his language was disgusting in the lesson” – you are much better off keeping it to what actually happened “Harry came into the classroom today and when I asked him to take off his coat, he told me to shut up” is harder hitting, much more accurate and also makes it sound less like it’s your opinion.

When you report any sanctions you gave you may also want to link it clearly to the school’s behaviour policy – “I had no choice but to have him removed in line with the school’s behaviour policy and he then lost his breaktime as a result” – this takes away some of the feeling that you are directly responsible for the sanction, and thus the person to direct any negative energy towards.

If the time is right you can then start to talk about how to move forward, what your expectations for the student are and what the next lesson or interaction with them might look like.

That is the ultimate goal – how can you improve the situation moving forward.

Always try to be aware of the time of day and the time your conversation may take – if you know you need to have a long chat with a parent don’t just call and expect them to drop everything for you – there’s nothing wrong with letting them know this could be a longer conversation and asking if there’s a more convenient time for them.

Equally, in reverse, you aren’t obligated to take a call that sucks up all of your precious time and you need to be willing to do the same thing for yourself.

The more you get to know certain parents, the more you will know their working patterns and their ability to talk with you.

Share this information with other staff if you develop it so that they can also benefit from what you’ve found.

Some parents will prefer email communication due to their availability and if this works for you it can be a really powerful way to address concerns that also removes some of the emotion brought by a phonecall – all I would say is to treat it as you would an internal email – keep it professional and respond within your working hours.

It’s also important to make sure that you are aware of who you are calling, and their relationship to the child, and make every effort possible to use the parent/carer’s name.

A pet hate of mine is “Is this Abby’s mum?” – you should be using their title and surname as standard – as part of your introduction confirm who they are, even if it’s the seventeenth time you’ve spoken to them it sets the standard, “Hi, is that Mrs Smith? Ah great, it’s Mr Acton calling from X – how are you? Have you got a few minutes to talk?” and also ensures you are speaking to the right person from a safeguarding perspective.

Be confident in ending a call if it does become problematic – there are some parents/carers who just won’t countenance what you have to say – this may also stretch to abusive language or threats.

This can be for any number of reasons but ultimately you do not come to work to be verbally abused.

If you can feel a conversation is getting heated, then you are probably best to draw it to a close with a more definite statement “I’m hopeful that we can work together to achieve the best for XYZ but I think it’s best if we pick this up again at a later date. Either I, or XYZ, will give you a call back in the next X days – thank you for your time”.

You can then decide if you need to escalate the conversation up the chain and get a more senior member of staff to call to resolve the issue, or whether some breathing room and time to digest the issue will mean you can have the conversation yourself at a later date.

It’s always worth flagging this as an issue to your line manager or SLT as you may not be the only member of staff being put in this situation.

For some staff, communication home is something that brings anxiety and fear – this shouldn’t be the case.

I can count on one hand the number of phone calls home that I’ve made where I’ve ended the call feeling like it was unpleasant.

If you stick to some of the tried and tested approaches discussed here you should be able to develop a script and a methodology for communication that ensures that you always start off on the right foot and, when you don’t, you know how to bring it to a conclusion.

As with anything – the more you do the easier it becomes – for the past however many years I have started every phone call the exact same way (introduction, how are you, have you got time to talk?) and I doubt I’ll ever change that now.

One final tip is to ask a member of staff who you know is regularly in touch with parents if you can shadow them making a couple of difficult calls, particularly to those you may have struggled with, and you’ll soon see that it’s a skill to be honed.

Having parents on your side is one of the greatest tools to have in your toolkit – the knowledge that you and their parents are working in sync is one that strikes fear into the hearts of many a troublemaker and can inspire many students to show their best self.

In a post-covid world I am finding that parents are desperate to communicate and want to find out more about their children than ever – it’s an opportunity to be capitalised on.

Connor Acton
NEC Member
NAPCE

AWARDS: A Report & List of Winners from NAPCE Awards 2021

The winners of the second annual National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education were unveiled at an online ceremony on September 23rd.

More entries than before, very deserving winners and fantastic support from across the education sector characterised NAPCE Awards 2021.

The online event was hosted by former teacher, current marketing expert and NAPCE NEC member Victoria Bownes.

Guests heard a compelling and inspiring ket note speech from Inclusion Expert’s Daniel Sobel, NAPCE Chair Phil Jones also addresses delegates.

Here are the winners and finalists of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021.

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsored by BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland

Royal School Dungannon, Dugannon, Northern Ireland

Oakfield School, Hull

The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester

School for Inspiring Talents, Newton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsored by The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire

The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London

Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland

Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsored by Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire

Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire,

Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire

Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsored by Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London

Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland

Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community School, Belmont Durham,

Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year –  Sponsored by NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire,Flourish Personal Development Programme

Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor,TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program

St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme

Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshir

Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull

Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire

Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Bromsgrove International School, Thailand

Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern

Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsored by The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

Stephen Lane, author of ‘Beyond Wiping Noses

 

AWARDS: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones Shares Speech from NAPCE Awards 2021

It is a great pleasure as National Chair of the Association to welcome you to the ceremony for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE.

Once again, this year it is an online event, and it is a pity that we cannot be in the same room to congratulate our winners and finalists.

It does mean that we can be joined tonight by people form all corners of the United Kingdom and indeed from around the world.

It is true to say that the 2020 – 2021 academic year was a difficult and challenging year for education.

It is remarkable how well children and young people have been supported through this period.

Schools have been challenged to find new ways of working and coping with the demands of the latest risk assessment.

Everybody who has worked in pastoral roles and supported learners are heroes in this academic year for the support you have provided and the difference you have made in the learning experience and lives of children and young people.

The nominations for the awards show the brilliant work that is taking place to support learners and all our finalists are an inspiration to all of us and fully deserve the recognition and respect that comes with being nominated.

The experience of the pandemic has raised awareness about the important role education has in supporting the socialisation and well-being of children and young people.

The pastoral work in schools, colleges and higher education often takes place without being noticed and valued but it makes a huge contribution in developing children and young people into positive and well-adjusted members of society.

The pandemic experience has encouraged researchers, writers, and practitioners to revisit what is the purpose of education with greater value being placed on the personal development of children and young people as human beings.

This contribution to a person’s education is important to enable them to make a positive contribution to society and live fulfilled lives.

It is the whole school experience that is important where children and young people learn not just form the content of lessons but also from the interaction with other people, the relationships they build and the experiences they have.

Schools and learning will be different after the pandemic with increasing use of technology for example for virtual parents’ evenings and online learning, but we must not forget that what is important in education is supporting and developing the children and young people in our care and preparing them for successful lives in the future.

It is important as we move towards normal or at least a new normal that we do not lose the value placed on supporting the personal development and well-being of learners that has emerged as being so important following our experience of the pandemic.

One of the best ways to do that is by becoming a member of NAPCE.

I am pleased to say that despite the restrictions of the pandemic the membership of NAPCE has increased.

This highlights the growing interest in supporting children and young people to achieve their full potential.

A special welcome to our new members this evening who may be attending a NAPCE event for the first time.

We look forward to meeting you in person soon and sharing our interest in supporting learners to be successful in their education and to prepare them for their future lives.

If you are not yet a member and you are interested in the care and support of learners, why not keep in contact with our work by visiting the NAPCE website or by contacting NAPCE admin to be added to the circulation list for the free monthly newsletter. We hope that you will follow and support NAPCE’s work by following on Twitter and other social media platforms.

2022 will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE. A number of activities and events are planned to celebrate the 40 years that academics, researchers, writers and practitioners have been working together to promote the importance of care and support as important parts of a person’s educational experience.

These include the publication of a new book about pastoral care edited by NAPCE, special editions of our academic journal and a live conference where we will meet in person to share ideas and good practice, and of course do not forget the 2022 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education.

We are nearly ready for me to hand back to Victoria our host for the evening for the announcement of the winners in each category.

Before I do that, please can I thank everybody who took the time to make a nomination to recognise the excellent good practice taking place in the pastoral care and support of learners.

Please can I thank our sponsors for your support for the 2021 awards, Blue Sky Education, Taylor & Francis, Inclusion Expert, The Association of School and College Leaders, Hult International Business School and The Thrive Approach.

Your support for the education of children and young people by supporting these awards is really appreciated.

Please can I thank our judges, Emeritus Professor Stan Tucker, Emeritus Professor Richard Pring, Associate Professor Anne Emerson and Doctor Noel Purdy for your time and careful consideration of the nominations.

Finally, a huge thank you from NAPCE to everybody who works in pastoral roles or contributes to the development of pastoral care theory and practice for the difference you make every day in the learning experience and future lives of learners.

Enjoy the evening, congratulations to all the finalists and thank you for your support for NAPCE.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

GOOD PRACTICE: Winner of “Best School” at NAPCE Awards 2021 Shares Good Practice Examples

It was a pleasure to celebrate the achievements of winners and finalists highlighted at the National Awards For Pastoral Care In Education 2021 at the presentation event on 23rd September which took place online.

The evening was hosted by NAPCE’s Victoria Bownes and the welcome was given by our National Chair, Phil Jones and the guest presentation by author Daniel Sobel.

It was inspiring to listen to all the good practice that is taking place in pastoral care in education and the contributions that are being made in different ways to innovate and develop new ideas and practice.

This month we are going to focus on the category of Pastoral School of the Year which was sponsored by BlueSky Education.

This category recognises schools that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.
 
The winner of this award in this category, announced at the presentation ceremony was Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland. 

This is the good practice in the school that impressed the judges. 

Limavady High School – How They Won the Award

The PTA funded 60 food hampers for FSM families. Years 11-14 Action Mental Health workshops.

One to one professional mentoring for boys at risk of underachieving.

Worked with UV Arts to provide a ten-week programme for vulnerable pupils.

Dedicated member of staff for lockdown outreach phone calls.

Pastoral Care Google Classroom for child protection and wellbeing.

Staff training: mental health first aid, suicide prevention, ACEs and neglect.

Wellbeing Week activities. Children’s Mental Health week activities.

14 pupils trained as Anti-Bullying Buddies.

RESTORE programme to address lockdown experiences.

Sensory room.

SEN lunch hub.

All Classroom Assistants trained in First Aid.

The judges were also impressed by the work and good practice of the finalists in this category and the positive support they are giving for the children and young people in their care. Here are some examples of that good practice.

The Good Practice Submitted by Finalists in the Category. 

Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland

At RSD there is a clear commitment to deliver outstanding pastoral provision both internally and beyond the school gates. In house, groups such as the pupil led ‘Safer School’ team raise whole school awareness regarding key issues. ‘Safe Space’ drop-in, run by local youth workers, pupils & staff, provides a ‘safe’ place for any pupil in need. There is an extensive preventative curriculum programme firmly embedded into school life. Groups such as AMH, Relax Kids, Youth for Christ & Niamh Louise Foundation are key. ‘Link’ teachers exist & staff have completed a wide range of quality pastoral training. RSD has also been at the heart of the community in organising a community wide mental health awareness campaign. Most recently it has secured funding from local churches, schools and businesses to enable the charity Reach Mentoring to start work in Dungannon.

Oakfield School, Hull

Oakfield School is a Residential co-educational school specialising in Social, Emotional, and Mental Health. Our passion for a whole school approach to pupils wellbeing is outstanding. The quality of our pastoral care influences the ethos and tone of the whole school alongside our enriched, engaging 24hr curriculum in a safe learning environment. During the pandemic staff have delivered food parcels, made weekly phone calls visited pupils and their families and paid for laptops/dongles for every pupil to support learning. Staffs determination to ensure pupils and their families wellbeing has remained Paramount is incredible. This is my reason for nominating Oakfield.

The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester

 This year, the school has supported pupils and families in more ways than usual. During lockdown, staff made weekly calls home, or more where needed. When issues were identified such as finance, housing or food issues, the team reacted quickly and liaised with agencies. Staff arranged for the food bank to provide food or dropped parcels off ourselves. School remained open for most and we introduced the Thrive programme to provide bespoke wellbeing interventions. We started art therapy and arranged alpaca, horse and gardening interventions for some. Parent support sessions were provided online and posted on a You Tube channel.

School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

As a school with a demonstrable commitment to pastoral care that is making a significant positive impact on our students’ social and emotional development, we would be delighted to be recognised by The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education. School for Inspiring Talents is an innovative independent therapeutic day school based in South Devon.  Established in 2014, it was set up with a clear vision to help transform the life chances of young people who have experienced childhood trauma.   We have a team of 73 dedicated teaching, clinical, therapeutic and office staff, supporting 53 students who have previously struggled in mainstream settings. The high staff:student ratio means that our students benefit from holistic pastoral support that meets their specific needs, helping them to overcome their individual barriers to learning.    Our innovative approach to education and commitment to pastoral care has delivered enormous impact on the lives of our students and their families. Feeling safe and secure with our dedicated team, our students WANT to come to school each day. They are able to build trusted relationships with staff as well as peer relationships with other students. We are privileged to see enormous progress with the children – something as small as giving eye contact, saying ‘good morning’, or playing with others can be a significant achievement for our students. Seeing their confidence and self-worth flourish is incredibly rewarding for staff. Our core values to Care, Nurture and Inspire, form the bedrock of our organisation as we support every learner to reach their individual potential. 100% of the children in our school have a specialist Education, Health and Care Plan with social and emotional mental health issues diagnosed as their primary need. Many are in care. On average at least 70% of have witnessed domestic violence, 68% have experienced physical and/or sexual abuse; 61% come from homes with parental mental health concerns and 92% are classified as having Type 3 Trauma (Complex Interpersonal Trauma). Many of the children are unable to use language to talk about their experiences. Several have been persistent school refusers in their previous school career. Our emphasis on pastoral care and support comes from the top; Mark Escott, Co-Founder of School for Inspiring Talents, experienced an abusive and chaotic childhood himself. As a dyslexic, he found school difficult and he found escape through drugs and crime, which later led to a two-year spell living in a hostel for young men on probation. Despite leaving school with no qualifications, Mark went on to carve out an impressive career as a child and adolescent behaviour specialist, working therapeutically with young people and families within the Social Care, Health and Education sectors. Driven by watching children slip through the net in mainstream schools, Mark set up Life Chance Education Ltd and went on to open School for Inspiring Talents to help transform the life chances of young people in our communities.  Based in school, our Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) provide a range of therapies to support our children’s individual needs.   Our MDT includes: Consultant Clinical Psychologist  Occupational Therapist  Speech and Language Therapist  Mental Health Practitioner  Trauma Recovery Practitioners  Family Support Workers  Therapeutic Outdoor Practitioner  Blu – our very special therapy dog. Our MDT work closely with teachers and support staff to ensure that students grow socially and emotionally alongside their educational development. A range of therapeutic assessments and methods are used by the team to help identify and support each student’s specific developmental needs. We have two Pastoral Co-ordinators at the school who each take the lead for our pastoral care across our two sites.  As TIS Practitioners (Trauma Informed Schools), they are the first point of contact for student and staff wellbeing in the school. Our Pastoral Co-ordinators oversee the strategies in place to help provide our students with the care and support they need to reach their potential.

Congratulations to all the finalists in this category for the excellent work you are doing to support learners and thank you to the nominees who highlighted this good practice that is taking place.

We hope to have nominations from the schools for the 2022 Awards to share more information about the good practice taking place.

REPORT: NAPCE Chair Phil Jones’ Report from the Organisation’s October NEC Meeting

The National Executive Committee (NEC) of the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE) met on Saturday 9thOctober.

Once again it was an online meeting because of the uncertainty of travelling from different parts of the United Kingdom and Europe caused by the pandemic.

It is frustrating that we are still unable to meet in person, but a sensible approach seems to be appropriate with members of NEC travelling long distances to attend.

Thanks to the commitment of members of NEC and the administrative support we were able to continue to be positive about the work of NAPCE and about plans, but it is not the same as being able to meet together to share ideas and discuss issues.

This is especially true because we have people who have recently joined NEC who we have not been able to meet in person.

Let us hope that this changes soon, and we will be able to be in the same room and fully involved in discussions and planning for future activities.

The meeting had a full agenda and covered a large amount of business to enable the association to continue its work and engagement with educationalists who share our interest in pastoral care and support for learners.

The meeting is an opportunity for members of NEC to update each other about their work on behalf of NAPCE since the last meeting.

An item about strategic planning included a discussion about using online opportunities to develop links with professionals working in different regions and to raise their awareness about NAPCE.

Jill Robson the national secretary provided an update about NEC elections and membership, and it was very encouraging to hear that there has been a large increase in the membership of the Association in the last year.

It is hoped that membership will continue to grow as NAPCE supports schools to respond to the challenges of the pandemic and how to meet the mental health and personal developments needs of children and young people.

The NEC were updated about the administrative support arrangements for the Association and given a positive report about the financial situation.

A report on publicity and marketing showed that the increased engagement with NAPCE continues.

Contact is being made with the Association through social media, the website and telephone.

Professor Stan Tucker, the Editor of the Associations academic journal ‘Pastoral Care in Education’ provided a very encouraging report with the number of articles being submitted for publication increasing and the international reputation of the journal growing.

A report was provided about the 2021 National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education, following the awards ceremony organised by NAPCE in September.

There were more nominations in 2021 than in the previous year and the judges were very impressed by the excellent examples of good practice that were highlighted.

The presentation Ceremony took place online and was very well attended on the evening.

The guest speaker was the author, Daniel Sobel. The winners were announced, and their plaques have been sent to them in the post.

Some of the comments on the chat during the evening included

“Great presentation. Thank you, Daniel”
“Thank you to the NAPCE team for getting this together”
“Well done everyone and thanks for organising such a great event”
“Lovely to hear you so happy. Well done Achieve NI”
“Thanks for organising such a wonderful event!”
“Thanks to everyone, so proud of the team at LHS”

Plans were discussed for the 2022 Awards, and it was agreed that they would be launched in November.

Launch November 2021
Nominations Open November 2021
Nominations Close May 30th 2022
Judging Completed Friday 25th June 2022
Tickets for Presentation Available July 2022
Invitations to Attend Presentation July 2022
Presentation Event Autumn 2022

The meeting included a report on NAPCE activities in the last few months and although they have been restricted by the pandemic it has seen plenty of engagement and contact with educationalists form different parts of the UK and around the world. The online conference organised in the Spring was a huge success with over 900 people showing an interest in the conference on the NAPCE Eventbrite page. The conference included presentations on current pastoral topics and a ‘Question Time’ with an invited panel. Tickets sold out four weeks before the event and delegates attended from as far away as Sydney, Nairobi, North Vancouver and Lima.

These were some of the comments from delegates
“Absolutely brilliant. Just what I need at the moment”
“To all the presenters, well done”
“Really enjoyed the whole conference. Thank you to everyone at NAPCE”
“Very interesting Question time hosted by NAPCE and some thought provoking contributions”
“Excellent discussion with some interesting diverse ideas”
“Thank you NAPCE for organising a great event and providing the opportunity to explore some important current issues”
“Great webinar. Very useful.  Thank you NAPCE”

Next year will be the 40th anniversary of NAPCE since it first started supporting Pastoral care in Education in 1982.

Several ideas for events and activities were discussed to celebrate the anniversary with plans for a weekend of events in the Autumn.

More details will be provided on social media, on the website and of course in future editions of the NAPCE monthly newsletter.

In the afternoon there was a meeting of the editorial Board which manages the Associations’ academic journal.

The next meeting of the NEC along with the AGM is planned for Saturday 26th March 2022.

Phil Jones
National Chair
NAPCE

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE News – September 2021

NAPCE News – September 2021

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

FEATURE ARTICLE: LGBT+ Issues in Schools: a Reflection on the First Anniversary of the Introduction of Statutory Relationships & Sex Education in England & Wales by Max Biddulph

LGBT+ issues in schools: a reflection on the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education in England and Wales by Max Biddulph

September 2021 marks the first anniversary of the introduction of statutory Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) in England and Wales, following a campaign by researchers, practitioners and activists in the field over two decades, to secure a more solid footing for this subject in schools.

Along with PSHE, this subject not only comprises a strong component of the pastoral curriculum, it also informs the pastoral interventions that teachers make on a daily basis with children and young people on a one to one.

Being a gay man of ‘a certain age’ I know from my own ‘educational back-story’ why feeling included and supported in a personal identity is so important in sustaining a sense of self-esteem and associated feelings of agency, needed for personal growth and educational success.

These are not only conditions that I want for me, I feel they are absolutely fundamental for all human beings in the world. Given this backdrop, I would like to share with you some observations on this, the first anniversary of the new ‘curricular-pastoral environment’ in the teaching of LGBT+ issues in RSE.

Historically, a tension has always existed between the concepts of ‘schooling’ and ‘sexualities’ and in the UK context, attempts by the state to control the messaging to children and young people about sexuality and gender is characterised by legislation such as the now infamous Section 28 of the Local Government Act, 1988.

Developments in the new millennium changed this stance and a combination of homophobic/transphobic bullying research, calls from practitioners, pressure from LGBT+ Communities and the legal implications of the Equality Act 2010, have combined to create the antecedents for reform.

Given that schools are now required to teach either Relationships Education (primary) or Relationships and Sex Education (secondary), it was perhaps inevitable that the inclusion of LGBT+ issues would have the potential to initiate another round of controversy.

In her article ‘LGBT teaching in primary school: equality, discrimination and freedom of expression’ (Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 42(2) 243-245), Emma Nottingham (2020) captures what was in 2019, perhaps the peak moment in the challenge between members of mainly British Pakistani community and an inner-city primary school where weeks of protest on the street outside the school culminated in a legal injunction being sought by Birmingham City Council to restrict the street gatherings and the online abuse made via social media of staff teaching the Relationships Education curriculum.

At the heart of this dispute is the question as to whether it is appropriate to teach primary school children about a range of relationships and identities that exist in society i.e. heterosexual, same-sex etc.

In the case of Birmingham City Council vs Afsar, Nottingham (2020) notes that the ruling by Mr Justice Warby who found in favour of the city council, drew on both the UK Equality Act 2010 and the European Convention on Human Rights.  With regard to the latter, Justice Warby stated that his judgement sought to strike a balance between Article 10 (freedom of expression), Article 8 (right to private and family life), Article 9 (freedom of thought conscience and religion and Article 11 (freedom of association). This is an important judgement for two reasons:

  1. It sets a precedent in the legal acceptance of Relationships and Sex Education to be taught in an inclusive way i.e portraying the full range of sexualities and relationships
  2. It shines a light of the extraordinarily complex territory that education has to navigate in terms of culture, values and what constitutes ‘age-appropriate knowledge’.

In responding to the challenge of teaching RSE in schools where cultural diversity is very prominent, a number of really significant implications emerge.

The first of these relates to the need for a really robust stance when it comes to the ways in which equality diversity and inclusion will be addressed in the day-to-day activity of the school.

Having worked with colleagues in the school at the centre of the dispute, I can see that their stance on this is the bedrock of their practice, and the mechanism that ultimately lead to a legal resolution of the issue. This ‘whole school approach’ permeates not just the statements in policies that position the schools’ values but communicates the need for respect in all relationships in the school community.

The latter requires incredibly sensitive handling and an ability to engage in assertive communication that simultaneously ‘holds’ and respects the range of diversity.

In the post local education authority era where specialist professional development has to be sought further afield, I would urge schools not to struggle with these issues on their own. Specialist advice is available from national organisations such as the Sex Education Forum/National Childrens Bureau, who can advise for example, on consultations/information giving for parents about the content and delivery of RSE.

A second ‘implication’ relates to the ways in which communities and identities are understood by practitioners. An unsettling dimension of the dispute is the fact that the issues cut across sensitive domains of race, culture, faith, ethnicity and sexuality.

It would be easy to stereotype individuals based on these dimensions and the problem with this is that it leads to blind spots which obscure the complexity of intersectionality. With a more open mind it is possible to see how for example, a young person of British Pakistani heritage could find themselves curious or questioning their sexual orientation.

Fifty years of narratives of LGBT+ experience has taught us what a potentially lonely and difficult place this is, emotionally. Having an identity acknowledged or affirmed albeit in the form of a passing reference, could be crucial to longer term experience of self-esteem.

Since these tumultuous events of 2019, life in the school briefly returned to normal and the street outside fell silent again.

The arrival of the Covid-19 global pandemic with all the diversion and disruption that ensued, has briefly drawn a curtain over the new dawn of RSE in schools in England and Wales.

The issue of mental well-being in school communities has surfaced as a key consideration and this illuminates a final implication emerging from the case.

Staff self-care needs to be paramount especially in situations where staff find themselves caught in situations where strongly held values and emotions are being expressed in relation to the inclusion of LGBT+ issues.

Some comfort can be taken from the fact that legal injunctions can be taken out to prevent the online abuse of school staff via social media and the fact as Nottingham (2020:245) observes:
‘that sex and relationships education can be capable of reflecting various relationship types whist respecting the values and cultures and religions that advocate heterosexual relationships’.

Max Biddulph, Chair Editorial Board, Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

AWARDS: Tickets Available for NAPCE Awards 2021

National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021

Excitement is building ahead of for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 Presentation Event this month.

This important event in the educational calendar takes place this year online on Thursday 23rd September at 7pm.

Join with NAPCE to celebrate the good practice in pastoral care in education as the winners in each category are announced.

There are a few remaining tickets for links to the event. Follow this link to register. https://napceawardspresentation2021.eventbrite.co.uk/

Pastoral School of the Year – Sponsor BlueSky Education

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school.

Finalists
Royal School DungannonDugannon, Northern Ireland
Oakfield School
The Children’s Hospital School , Leicester
Limavady High SchoolLimavady, Northern Ireland
School for Inspiring TalentsNewton Abbott, Devon

Pastoral Team of the Year – Sponsor – The Thrive Approach

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

Finalists
The Grove Pastoral Team, The Grove School, Tottenham, London
All Saints C of E Primary School, Wigston Leicestershire
Limavady High School , Limavady, Northern Ireland
Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Buxton Community School, Buxton, Derbyshire

Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year – Sponsor- Inclusion Expert 

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

Finalists
Zoe Knight, Westfield Infant School, Hinckley, Leicestershire
Julie McCartney, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland, nominated by Laura Fisher
Dawn Sadler, Learning Mentor at Moulton Primary School, Moulton, Northamptonshire
Dr Helen O’Connor, St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire
Mrs Shanie Thorpe, Bishop Challoner School Basingstoke

Pastoral Leader of the Year – Sponsor  Taylor and Francis

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

Finalists
Miss Laura Fisher, Limavady High School, Limavady, Northern Ireland
Helen Burton (Deputy Headteacher) Belmont Community SchoolBelmont Durham
Luke Ramsden, Senior Deputy Head, St Benedict’s School, Ealing, London
Micki Handford, The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester
Alison Simpson, Cobden Primary School, Loughborough, Leicestershire

Pastoral Development of the Year – Sponsor NAPCE

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

Finalists
Mayameen Meftahi, Student Support and Intervention Mentor TRT (Trauma Recovery & Training) Student Support and mentoring Intervention Program
St. Swithun’s School, Winchester, Hampshire, Positive Education Curriculum
Jenny Kay, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire, Flourish Personal Development Programme
The Children’s Hospital School, Leicester, The Thrive Programme
Buxton & Leek College, Leek, Staffordshire, My team (Learner Journey Team), BLC INVEST

Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor NAPCE

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference in pastoral care, for the benefit of young people.

Finalists
Jan Ashton, Nidderdale High School, Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Sarah Cockerline, Oakfield School, Hull
Nicola Wright, Nidderdale High School,Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire
Claire Gibbs, Ridgeway Secondary School, Redditch, Worcestershire
AchieveNI, Belfast Northern Ireland

International Contribution to Pastoral Care – Sponsor The Hult International Business School

An international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Finalists
Bromsgrove International School, Thailand
Stephany Herzog, International School of Zug and Luzern
Child1st Consultancy Limited

Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care – Sponsor -The Association of School and College Leaders

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

To be announced at the event.
 

RESEARCH: Invitation to Take Part in Research Focused on Online Safety for Young People

NAPCE has been informed about some important research into keeping young people safe online.

The researchers who have been guest writers for NAPCE News and recently presented at the NAPCE online conference are recruiting parents in the UK who have at least one child aged 13-18.

They have provided us with the following details.

“We are a team of researchers interested in learning how parents of youth (aged 13 to 18) such as you perceive the impact of COVID-19 on the sexual and gendered risks and harms that young people face online.

“By completing this survey, you would be helping to inform resources for young people, teachers, and parents on how to stay safe online during the pandemic and beyond.”

Link to the survey: https://form.typeform.com/to/hCwcfzF5?typeform-source=t.co

Thanks!
Kaity

Dr.Kaitlynn Mendes
Associate Professor of Sociology
Western University”

EVENT: Pastoral Leaders Invited to Attend New Pastoral Forum

NAPCE is pleased to have been invited to attend the Pastoral Forum for the recently formed International Forum for Inclusive Practitioners by Inclusion Expert who are one of the sponsors for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 being organised by NAPCE.

They have sent NAPCE the following details.

“We’d like to remind all those with a pastoral interest that the Pastoral Forum is next week on Thursday 23rd at 2pm London BST.

If you know of any pastoral leaders, please let them know about it.

For more details and to find out about the link to this forum please contact

Lesley Bradley
Secretary to Daniel Sobel, CEO
lesley.bradley@inclusionexpert.com

JOURNAL: Special Edition of Pastoral Care In Education to be Released in October

NAPCE Journal – Special Edition

Have you every thought about how COVID-19 has impacted on the pastoral care of children and young people throughout the world?

The next edition of Pastoral  Care in Education – will attempt to go some way towards answering that question.

In what is one of the first academic journal to explore this issue, Professor Carol Mutch, one of our international editors,  has put together a series of internationally authored papers that identify both specific and global issues that are currently  impacting on the lives of many children and young people.

For more information contact admin@napce.org.uk

Professor Stan Tucker
Executive Editor – Pastoral Care in Education.

NAPCE Awards 2022 – ENTRY NOW OPEN

Entry for the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2022 is now open.

The Awards is the first and only scheme based in the UK to recognise great practice of pastoral care providers in the education sector.

We have been delighted with the success of the NAPCE Awards since we launched in 2020 and the initiative continues to go from strength to strength.

We hosted a packed and exciting Presentation Evening in September 2021 and we are planning to host an in-person event for the first time in 2022, all being well.

The Awards will be part of a programme of events to celebrate NAPCE’S 40th anniversary in 2022.

The closing date for all categories this year will be Monday May 30th, 2022, so don’t hang around, get your entries in now.

Just like previous years, the finalists of the National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education will be selected by an independent judging panel and invited to attend the ceremony to share the experience with peers and find out who wins each Award.

NAPCE is inviting nominations in the following categories;

Pastoral School of the Year
Pastoral Team of the Year
Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
Pastoral Leader of the Year
Pastoral Development of the Year
Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
International Contribution to Pastoral Care

You can enter the NAPCE categories here Enter here

Nominations are encouraged for awards in different categories from schools and educational establishments and you DO NOT need to currently be a member of NAPCE to take part.

NAPCE Awards 2022 is an excellent opportunity to share good practice in pastoral care and through our social media, website and those of our partners, the Awards raises awareness of where pastoral support is making a real difference in the educational experience of young people.

The Awards also encourages new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and will recognise the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

This is an opportunity to recognise the impact the work of pastoral staff is having on the achievement and well being of young people.

The decisions about prize winners in each category will be made by a panel of invited professionals who work in pastoral care.

There will be a prize of £100.00 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

The criteria for the NAPCE awards are;

•Pastoral School of the Year
A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school

•Pastoral Team of the Year
A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with

•Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success

•Pastoral Leader of the Year
Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with

•Pastoral Development of the Year
A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people

•Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people

•Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care

•International Contribution to Pastoral CareAn international school, organisation outside of the UK or an individual working in research or in an international school outside of the UK, that has promoted or delivered high quality pastoral care.

Nominations for the NAPCE Awards are welcome from member schools and institutions and from schools and institutions that are not currently members of NAPCE.

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