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NAPCE News – December 2020

NAPCE News – December 2020

Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

Interested in joining the NAPCE team?
NAPCE is an organisation that depends mainly on volunteers of dedicated educational  professionals who have a particular interest in the personal, social and emotional development of young people. The organisation is overseen by a national executive who meet twice a year to plan and develop strategy. We have vacancies on the national executive at the moment and are looking to recruit new members from all areas of education. If you would be interested in joining the executive please visit the NAPCE website and fill in a Declaration of Interest form. If you have any questions or would like further information please email admin@napce.org

FEATURE ARTICLE: “Are Schools the Production Lines of the 21st Century?” – NAPCE Chair Phil Jones Looks at Making Young People the Priority for the Education System in the Future.

Are schools the production lines of the 21st century? Making the needs of young people the priority for the education system of the future.

As we approach the end of 2020 there is no doubt that this has been a difficult and challenging year for everybody working in education.

The positive response is to want some good to come out of a negative experience.

The hope is that this will inspire educationalists, to look for ways to improve young people’s learning experience in the future.

The unexpected challenges presented by the pandemic have exposed some of the realities about how our educational system works.

It is inevitable that this will encourage educationalists and everybody with an interest in education to question the priorities and purpose of our educational system.

This was illustrated by how the pandemic, impacted on the examination process in the summer of 2020 and questioned the relevance of the current education system in the country.

The purpose of the current education system, it can be argued, is to be a production line turning out workers for a capitalist economy.

Schools have accepted a role, similar to factories after the industrial revolution, where they produce the compliant and conforming members of society who can be employed in roles to generate wealth.

This system is sustained by national leaders, enforcing this view of the purpose of education being about raising standards, with the strategies of inspection, league tables and parental choice.

Thinking about the purpose of education in the rapidly changing world of the 21st century encourages educationalists to question if this view of an education system is meeting the real needs of modern society.

It is relevant to reflect on whether the workforce of the future will require compliant employees, or will it be more appropriate to develop qualities such as creativity, problem solving, and the ability to work with other people and share ideas, as being more important in the modern workplace.

Martin Illingworth in his recently published book, “Forget School”, argues that jobs in the future will be automated except for jobs that require creativity, emotional intelligence, or physical dexterity.

He calls for a curriculum that meets the needs of society and gives learners the best chance of participating (Illingworth 2020).

If this is true, then the implications for our schools is that the priority is not to enable learners to achieve standards and pass examinations.

It suggests that the role of the school in supporting the personal development of young people will become more important. Schools will have a role in developing the skills and attitudes that can then be demonstrated in the selection process for a job.

The task for schools will be to ensure a young person’s learning experience is relevant for making them employable in the modern world.

Schools will need to give more priority and invest time and resources in developing young people, that can make a positive contribution to society and to the economy.

There is a need for a collaborative approach to learning so young people can engage in collaborative problem solving (Illingworth 2020).

In the world of the 21st century, what you know becomes less important than the personal qualities that an individual can contribute. Google can find information at the press of a button.

This has implications for the design and implementation of relevant systems for the pastoral care and support of young people in schools in the future.

These pastoral systems of the future have a more important role than simply ensuring that young people in schools are compliant and conforming to meet the rules and expectations, to enable the school to achieve good examinational results.

Pastoral systems in schools have a role in developing personal qualities and skills, that can enable young people to sell themselves in the employment marketplace. “To be articulate these days is to be proficient online” (Illingworth 2020).

Pastoral systems and support provided for learners needs to make a real difference in developing the skills and attitudes that young people will need to be effective in the workplace and to make a positive contribution to society in the 21st century.

Schools and, in particular staff, working in pastoral roles need to be empowered to put the needs of young people at the heart of the learning process.

Providing time for pastoral work enables schools to invest valuable resources in supporting the learning experience of young people.

This needs to be deployed in a planned way, to ensure that these resources are being used to develop the personal qualities of the young people and prepare them for the workforce of the future and not on the production line of passing examinations.

“Remembering facts and passing examinations is not that useful anymore. Employers and clients are more interested in evidence of their online proficiency than in their examination results”. (Illingworth 2020).

Some of the possible responses to these challenges presented to schools, do not fit neatly into the curriculum boxes of subjects.

But pastoral systems have a more important role in meeting the more diverse needs of young people in preparing them for the demands of the modern world.

“Schools should be the perfect place to help children learn to collaborate”. (Illingworth 2020)

The pastoral systems of the future can provide schools with opportunities for young people to experience working collaboratively.

The challenge is not to focus on encouraging compliant and passive attitudes, because this approach supports the raising standards agenda.

The goal for pastoral systems in the modern school should be to encourage conformity but young people who challenge, question and clearly communicate their own views and opinions.

Pastoral care should be a dynamic process in schools, that encourages learners to develop the resilience, adaptability, and confidence to challenge ideas, that will enable them to be successful in the modern world and live fulfilled lives.

This focus on personal development in our education system is important for engaging young people in the learning process and to prepare a workforce for the country, that will be relevant for a modern society and economy.

As always these are my own thoughts but NAPCE would welcome your views and ideas.

Please follow NAPCE on Twitter (@NAPCE1.) Sharing our ideas means that we will emerge from the pandemic in a stronger position to focus our energy and expertise in making a difference in the future lives of young people.

I would like to take the opportunity to wish all our members and supporters on NAPCE, a Happy Christmas and to give my best wishes and hopes for a better year in education in 2021.

Phil Jones
National Chair
The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

References

Illingworth, M. 2020. Forget School. Why young people are succeeding on their own terms and what schools can do to avoid being left behind, Carmarthen, Independent Thinking Press.

EVENT: A Report on the Very Latest Events Involving the National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

During the Pandemic NAPCE has continued to connect with pastoral care professionals, associations and supportive businesses who have a significant interest in pastoral care in schools.

Of course, many of the events that would have been in-person are now taking place online and, in fact, new events have been organised because of the communication potential of the internet.

We are very pleased to share a fresh update on the events which NAPCE has been, or will be, involved with recently.

The Festival of Learning 2020

The Festival of Learning is an online event organised by Blue Sky Education to support new members of the profession.

Leading educationalists shared their expertise in webinars form 17th November until 8th December. The topics included. Building your Resourcefulness, Mindfulness Tools, Effective Assessment, Using Outlook, How to Build Motivation for Learning, Parents as Partners, and desk Yoga.

More information about the programme for the festival can be found on the BlueSky Education website. (Festival of Learning · BlueSky Learning)

One of the educationalists invited to present a webinar was our National Chair, Phil Jones. Phil presented a webinar with the title ‘Pastoral Care and Remote Learning’ and over 150 professionals form different parts of the country and around the world signed up to participate in this live event.

The webinar explored the pastoral demands that schools face during remote learning and what lessons can be learnt from the experience for improving future delivery of pastoral care and support for young people.

More information about the webinar presented by Phil Jones is available by following the link https://blueskylearning.co.uk/courses/47

Safer Internet Day 

NAPCE is pleased to be invited for the first time to be involved in the planning of Safer Internet Day which takes place on Tuesday 9th February 2021.

Phil Jones our National Chair has been attending meetings to contribute to the planning of the 2021 event. 170 countries around the world participate in safer Internet days to promote the safe use of the internet by young people.

The aim for the UK event is to inspire a national conversation about using technology respectfully, critically, and creatively, reaching more young people than ever before.

The 2021 Safer Internet Day will be a virtual event and will include a live streamed presentation hosted by BT from the BT studios. Attendance is by invitation only.

It will include information about the latest research and contributions from government and industry leaders and films from schools.  The focus for the 2021 campaign is on an ‘internet that we trust’.

Resources are available online by visiting the website at www.saferinternetday.org.uk.

The resources include packs for schools with ideas for assemblies and lessons with presentation slides.

Safer Internet Films are available for different age groups and for parents.

More details are available by following the link below.

https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/safer-internet-day/safer-internet-day-2021/i-work-young-people

Organisations can register as a supporter organisation as NAPCE has done and share your plans for how you will be supporting Safer internet day 2021
https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/2021/register

The social media links for the event are
Twitter
@uk-SIC
Instagram
@uk-SIC
www.facebook.com/saferinternetuk

Hashtag for the 2021 campaign is #AnInternetWeTrust

NAPCE is proud to be supporting the 2021 event, which is probably more important than ever because of the impact of the pandemic and the increasing amount of time young people are spending online. This is clearly an issue, that will be important for everybody with an interest in pastoral care and the well being of young people, and we hope you will give your support for the campaign to help make the internet a safe place in the future.

Association of School and College Leaders Annual Conference for Pastoral Leaders

NAPCE has for the last few years been a partner with ASCL in the planning and organisation of the annual conference for pastoral leaders. This year the conference will be a virtual event and will take place over several days in January 2021. Details about the conference can be found on the ASCL website by following this link,  https://www.ascl.org.uk/pastoral.

The Twitter hashtag for the conference is – #asclcare and @ASCL_UK. Confirmed speakers include Geoff Barton ASCL General Secretary and Margaret Mulholland the SEND and inclusion specialist for ASCL.

In a year that has brought extraordinary challenges for everyone the conference will provide the latest thinking and ideas about how pastoral leaders can respond. NAPCE Chair, Phil Jones will be presenting a workshop in partnership with Maria O Neil from UK Pastoral Chat looking at the impact of remote learning on pastoral care policy and practice.

This workshop is planned to take place on Monday January 25th between 11-30 and 12-30. Please visit the ASCL website for information about how to book a place for the conference.

The National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education 2021 organised by NAPCE

Following the huge success of the 2020 Awards despite the challenges presented by the pandemic NAPCE is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2021 National Awards for pastoral Care in Education organised by NAPCE will open soon.

After the additional challenges from the pandemic for professionals working in pastoral care this year it is more important than ever that the work and achievements of these people are recognised.

We hope that you will be involved by taking the time to nominate people who deserved to be recognised for the difference they make in the learning experience and future life chances of young people.

The categories for 2021 will be,

  • Pastoral School of the Year
  • Pastoral Team of the Year
  • Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
  • Pastoral Leader of the Year
  • Pastoral Development of the Year
  • Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
  • Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care
  • International Contribution to Pastoral Care

Please follow NAPCE on Twitter at NAPCE@NAPCE one for the latest news about the 2021 Awards and information about when the Awards will be launched and how to nominate.

Thank you to sponsors who have already confirmed that they would like to support one of the awards in 2021.

If you are interested in being a sponsor for the 2021 Awards, please contact NAPCE at admin@napce.org.uk

EVENT UPDATE: The latest on the ASCL Online Conference for Pastoral Leaders in January

 

Conference for Pastoral Leaders 2021 with ASCL

NAPCE is very proud to be partnering again with the Association of School & College Leaders for a new online Conference in January 2021 and we are delighted to provide an update on the content of the event.

The ASCL Conference For Pastoral Leaders 2021 – entitled “Reaching Out” – will take place on the internet across three days and will address the key issue of breaking barriers for disadvantaged learners.

Speakers at the event – on January 19th, 25th and 26th – include ASCL General Secretary Geoff Barton, CEO of Bite Back 2030 James Toop and the Alliance Director of Bite Back 2030 Melanie Renowden.

Also taking to the virtual podium at the event will be Dr Carlene Firmin MBE, Head of Contextual Safeguarding Programme at the University of Bedfordshire and Gavin Oattes, Managing Director and Owner of Tree of Knowledge.

Additionally, NAPCE Chair, Phil Jones will be presenting a workshop in partnership with Maria O’ Neill from UK Pastoral Chat looking at the impact of remote learning on pastoral care policy and practice.

This workshop is planned to take place on January 25th between 11.30am and 12.30pm.

About the Event

In a year that has brought extraordinary challenges for everyone, the support for vulnerable and disadvantaged children and young people continues to grow in complexity.With a great deal of uncertainty about what the months ahead may hold, the number of students facing barriers which impact their learning and development will grow.

Suitable for leaders across all phases, our 2021 Conference for Pastoral Leaders will focus on a range of issues, including wellbeing, safeguarding, the disadvantage gap, RSHE plus pastoral care and remote provision.

How it works

This conference will be delivered completely online through keynotes and interactive workshops. All sessions will be available to watch live or later via recordings.

Keynotes will take place on Tuesday 19 January from 10am – 12noon

There will be five workshops delivered across Monday 25 and Tuesday 26 January.

Webinar Requirements 

To attend this webinar live, you will need to ensure  you have access to a computer or device that meets the system requirements available here.

If you cannot attend live you will receive a copy of the recording, links to any resources discussed, and the opportunity to submit questions.

Fee

£125 +VAT per delegate
£250 +VAT for a school licence

Multi-academy trusts and other institutions with multiple sites should email pd@ascl.org.uk for a quote.

To book tickets click this link https://www.ascl.org.uk/pastoral

GOOD PRACTICE: The Latest Instalment in our New Series Focusing on Success Stories in Pastoral Care from NAPCE Award Contestants

 

Welcome to the latest in a series of “Good Practice” reports from finalists and winners of the NAPCE Awards 2020.

Every month we share examples of some of the greatest work within pastoral care in the UK education sector, following the first NAPCE Awards.

In this latest edition, we are featuring The Grove School in Tottenham, London, a school for young people aged 5-19 who have a primary diagnosis of autism.

The Grove School was the winner of the prestigious Pastoral School of the Year award at the NAPCE Awards 2020.

The following information was submitted to NAPCE by the school and we are very keen to share it with you.

The Grove School caters for children and young people 5–19 who have a primary diagnosis of autism, some pupils have additional needs.

Our vision to ‘Inspire Excellence – Champion Potential and Empower Learning’ is simple and founded on a desire to make a difference.

We aim to enable every pupil to flourish by encouraging and building on unique strengths and interests, supporting individuals to develop and deploy strategies to manage and cope with challenges, enabling them to reach their full potential.

We recognise that everyone is different, therefore the individual is always our starting point.

The school employs a full time Pastoral Lead who works as part of the Senior Leadership Team to champion individual wellbeing.

The Pastoral Lead has developed programmes which focus on pupil’s wellbeing and mental health focussing on student voice.

Both the Pastoral Lead and Headteacher champion mental health and positive wellbeing across the school.

In addition to academic achievement, the focus is on social, emotional and personal development. Developed by ensuring every pupil has opportunities to strengthen independence and living skills; key to building their confidence and self-esteem.

Our pupils have access to a team of skilled teachers, therapists, and professionals who work together to ensure each pupil has a learning programme tailored to their specific needs; led by our Deputy Headteacher.

Families are able to engage within their community, attend workshops and have access to a bespoke package of one-to-one family support which can and does include work within the home.

Support and advice is offered to ensure families feel confident and informed about their child’s needs and future prospects.

Central to this partnership is our commitment to working alongside families to support the progress and well-being of all pupils. We strive to develop the very best outcomes for everyone at The Grove. 

NAPCE News – November 2020


FEATURE ARTICLE: “Teaching during COVID-19” – the Challenges of Educating During the Pandemic with NAPCE Officer John Hunt

Educational Challenges During COVID-19 By John Hunt

The challenges of teaching throughout the COVID-19 pandemic have been varied and wide ranging.

With bubbles, online lessons, hybrid lessons, tracking and tracing, social distancing, masks in communal areas and strict teacher zones (or ‘the technical area’ as one colleague called it, which I liked!), it is easy to forget what ‘normal’ was before we were collectively hit by these absolutely necessary but slightly strange measures.

It is not, however, teaching that I wish to continue to focus on in this short article.

It is not the academic progress of our students, the loss of lesson time, the online learning or even the challenges that we as teachers face, all of which I feel have been given significant air time already.

I want to explore an observation I have made over these first ten weeks and would truly welcome any feedback of similar or contradicting experiences.

As a pastoral leader in a school, I still have the benefit and pleasure of seeing every year group, every day, when on playground duty and supporting staff across the school.

Year groups are kept separate, with staggered start times, break times and lunchtimes in order to maintain a safe distance between students.

While this has presented a significant challenge in terms of allocating duties, from a behaviour perspective this structure has had an undeniably positive impact in many ways.

Less students are out at break and lunch time, there is less physical space in school for staff to monitor at any one time due to the limited number of students needing to be supervised, Heads of Year can pick up students knowing exactly where their entire year group will be at one certain time and so on.

However, it has raised a question for me as I have observed our younger students: what impact is the lack of usual socialisation having upon these young people?

In September every year, Year 7 students join schools with a mix of excitement and trepidation.

No matter how great a transition programme they have experienced, these feelings are completely natural and I’m sure most of us remember them!

No longer are they ‘The Year 6’s’, the oldest kids in the school, the kids that know everything, the kids that know how it all works, the big fish in a small pond.

They are on a bigger site, equipped with all of the stationery imaginable, requiring a map to get around, with their new planner, with a much larger number of students and staff, with all kinds of new routines, experiences and issues to navigate.

They meet the older year groups and suddenly realise they are very much the smaller fish in a very big pond! Not this year, though, and it is very noticeable indeed…

In my experience, Year 7’s learn very quickly what is and is not socially acceptable on a secondary school playground!

The initial excitable behaviours of break time play, ticking, chasing etc. stops relatively quickly (often after they have accidentally bumped into a group of Year 10 boys!) Not this year, though…

At the time of writing, I find current Year 7 to be the ‘youngest’ of this year group I have ever seen in terms of their interactions with each other and with staff.

They are certainly a unique Year 7, in that they have not yet come into contact with any older students; they are in a strange limbo of having started secondary school but not yet having the full secondary experience.

They have not gone through the same rites of passage that almost all Year 7/ First year students before them have done and I find this genuinely interesting as I watch and monitor their behaviours during recreational time in school.

It has made me question what it is that sees young people lose this urge to play so publicly once joining secondary; is there anything we could have done differently to allow our youngest students to feel more comfortable in doing so?

Do the social norms in secondary schools prevent our youngest students from expressing themselves in this way? Do they want to behave like this every year but feel unable as a result of the cultural norms developed in schools over the years?

The evidence I’ve seen this term so far would certainly suggest so!

It is probably not unreasonable to think that their entire first secondary school year might be spent like this – separate break times and lunch times to the wider school.

I am keen to see how this develops over time and, when/if we return to ‘normal’ (whatever that was), I’ll be watching very closely to see how their delayed introduction to the wider school population goes… How will they cope? How will our older students respond to these younger students?

In the meantime, I hope that they continue to show the joyful exuberance they have brought with them from primary school. While I am 100% a secondary teacher and not at all used to seeing this behaviour on a secondary school playground, it certainly has its charms.
John Hunt
NAPCE Officer & Pastoral Leader

EVENT: NAPCE Partners with ASCL for Online Conference in January for Pastoral Leaders

 

Conference for Pastoral Leaders 2021 with ASCL

NAPCE is very proud to be partnering again with the Association of School & College Leaders for a new online Conference in January 2021.

The ASCL Conference For Pastoral Leaders 2021 – entitled “Reaching Out” – will take place on the internet across three days and will address the key issue of breaking barriers for disadvantaged learners.

Speakers at the event – on January 19th, 25th and 26th – include ASCL General Secretary Geoff Barton, CEO of Bite Back 2030 James Toop and the Alliance Director of Bite Back 2030 Melanie Renowden.

Additional speakers will be announced soon.

About the Event

In a year that has brought extraordinary challenges for everyone, the support for vulnerable and disadvantaged children and young people continues to grow in complexity.With a great deal of uncertainty about what the months ahead may hold, the number of students facing barriers which impact their learning and development will grow.

Suitable for leaders across all phases, our 2021 Conference for Pastoral Leaders will focus on a range of issues, including wellbeing, safeguarding, the disadvantage gap, RSHE plus pastoral care and remote provision.

How it works

This conference will be delivered completely online through keynotes and interactive workshops. All sessions will be available to watch live or later via recordings.

Keynotes will take place on Tuesday 19 January from 10am – 12noon

There will be five workshops delivered across Monday 25 and Tuesday 26 January.

Webinar Requirements 

To attend this webinar live, you will need to ensure  you have access to a computer or device that meets the system requirements available here.

If you cannot attend live you will receive a copy of the recording, links to any resources discussed, and the opportunity to submit questions.

Fee

£125 +VAT per delegate
£250 +VAT for a school licence

Multi-academy trusts and other institutions with multiple sites should email pd@ascl.org.uk for a quote.

To book tickets click this link https://www.ascl.org.uk/pastoral

FROM THE CHAIR: NAPCE Chief Phil Jones Looks Ahead to an Educational ‘Reset’ in 2021

The 2021 Education “Reset”

This year in education has been an exhausting challenge to cope with the unexpected.

The focus in schools has been on operational responses to the challenges presented by the pandemic, alongside all the usual challenges that schools face in any normal year.

Schools have had to adapt their practice to ensure that they are providing a safe learning environment for staff and learners.

The daily priority has been to teach young people as much as possible, as well as possible, in the middle of a global pandemic.

There has not been time for the luxury of creative thinking or developing new initiatives, to find exciting ways to improve the learning experience, which is often what gives educationalists working in schools such job satisfaction.

Old Moore’s Almanac has been published since 1697 and it uses astrology to make predictions for the coming year.

It may seem strange to be, ‘looking to the stars’ for inspiration and hope at this difficult time.

I have been reading the latest edition and it does encourage you the reflect on our experiences this year and to start looking forward to the opportunities that 2021 may bring for education.

Old Moore’s Almanac calls 2021 the year of ‘the reset’.

This is a term that I have heard in the last few weeks following the declaration that Joe Biden is the winner of the US presidential election even though that is still contested by the current resident of the White House.

It also seems relevant with the encouraging news emerging about the search for a vaccine. Published in June 2020 Old Moore’s Almanac commented.

“This is the right time to change the ways that the world has been working for everybody’s sake. The reset is upon us and there is no turning back”.

The concept of ‘the reset’ is useful for reflecting on the future of pastoral care and support for learners in our schools.

The pandemic has seen an increase in online learning, especially in higher education but also in schools. It is likely that this trend will continue and we will see an increasing use of technology to support learning.

Pastoral systems are likely to be under increased pressure to support young people, to become effective as independent learners, to be able to take advantage of all the opportunities provided by the developments in technology.

At the same time, the sharing of ideas and the need for collaborative approaches to problem solving will require pastoral systems, to encourage the personal development of young people to enable them to be successful at working in teams.

A new book, published recently, “Forget School. Why young people are succeeding on their own terms and what schools can do to avoid being left behind “, encourages educationalists to consider the relevance of how schools are currently organised for meeting the needs of young people in the modern world.

One review of the book comments.
Forget School argues that education for the 21st century must focus on the road ahead of us and not to teach through the rear-view mirror”.

(Mick Cannell, PGDE English Tutor, School of Education, University of Sheffield)

Thinking about the relevance of education in the future encourages professionals working in pastoral roles to consider the purpose of pastoral care and support for learners in the modern school.

It could be argued that currently pastoral care structures and systems in schools focus on encouraging compliance and conformity, to enable the school to achieve good results.

Schools have been left behind because they are operating with a crowd control mentality” 
(Illingworth 2020)

The question is, does this approach provide young people with the skills and attitudes they will need to be successful, in response to the challenges they will face in their future lives in the 21st century.

Pastoral systems that value the passive learner, are not going to make it a priority, to develop the skills and positive attitudes, needed to achieve success in the modern workplace.

Perhaps what is more relevant is an approach to pastoral care and support for learners, that encourages young people to question and challenge ideas and to be confident about working independently and as a member of a team, to find creative solutions to difficult problems.

This requires a change in beliefs about what is the purpose of pastoral care and support for learners in schools. Good results and academic achievement are important for a young person’s future live chances but if developing confidence and self-belief are a priority for pastoral systems, then learners are more likely to achieve their full potential.

The skills of problem solving, creative thinking and effective communication are likely to be more important in the workplace of the future and this requires ‘a reset’ in the approach to pastoral care and support for learners in our schools.

Please share your thoughts and ideas by visiting the NAPCE Twitter page at NAPCE@NAPCE1

Phil Jones
National Chair
The National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

References
Illingworth, Martin. (2020) Forget School. Why young people are succeeding on their own terms and what schools can do to avoid being left behind. Independent thinking press. Carmarthen, Wales.
Moore,Francis, (2020) Old Moore’s Almanac 2021, W Foulsham and Co Ltd , Croydon

GOOD PRACTICE: The Latest Instalment in our New Series Focusing on Success Stories in Pastoral Care from NAPCE Award Contestants

 

Welcome to the latest in a series of “Good Practice” reports from finalists and winners of the NAPCE Awards 2020.

Every month we share examples of some of the greatest work within pastoral care in the UK education sector, following the first NAPCE Awards.

In this new edition, we are featuring Eileen Pavey of Litcham School, a mixed all-through school in Kings Lynn, Norfolk.

Eileen was a finalist in the Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care category at the NAPCE Awards 2020.

The following information was submitted to NAPCE by the school and we are very keen to share it with you.

Eileen Pavey, Litcham School – NAPCE Awards 2020 Finalists

My aspiration to support others feels innate.

I have helped to establish the pastoral culture which is deeply embedded into our school and is fundamental in allowing our students to thrive.

Our ethos is built on trusted relationships; with students, families and the wider community and is something that I am extremely proud of.

Alongside Head of Year 7 and 8, I am the transition lead at Litcham School. I offer an array of student support whilst effectively coordinating the pastoral team, outside agency input, and our students who run groups and offer fantastic peer support.

We encourage our young people to talk about their thoughts and feelings.

As a Mental Health First Aider, I cascade training so that everyone can offer the quality care needed for our pupils to develop resilience, flourish, succeed and aspire.

Our students leave as well-rounded citizens and are aware that it’s natural to seek support; we offer a pastoral toolbox for life.

The success of our pastoral teamwork has been recognised by inspectors who reported that the ‘care and support for pupils are outstanding’.

Young people can witness our own struggles. Four years ago my 25 year old son Sam passed away; I have been blessed with such genuine, kind, whole school support.

In Sam’s memory I have set up a charity called ‘Sam’s Fund’ and the generosity has been overwhelming-over £100k has been raised towards a new school pavilion!

We end the year with the entire school taking part in Sam’s Run. A time to remember everyone we have loved and lost.

The atmosphere of togetherness and care is incredible.
I dedicate my wonderful NAPCE nomination to all at Litcham School – staff, students, parents and the wider community; our special Litcham family which I am so incredibly proud to be a part of.

I have added a quote from one of my wonderful Year 7 tutors Josh, who joined Litcham in September 2019:

‘Eileen is an extremely positive and supportive Head of Year who always offers her ear to students and staff alike.

“Her office door is always open and Eileen always makes you feel welcome; whatever else she has going on is put on pause so that she can advise and support.

“As an NQT and Form Tutor, Eileen’s encouragement and assistance has been invaluable to myself and the students this year’.

Eileen Pavey
Litcham School
Head of Year 7 & 8, Senior Pastoral Care Manager and Deputy safeguarding Lead

This picture shows a pull from Litcham School overcoming fears and achieving a zip line drop.

NAPCE News – November 2019

NAPCE News – November 2019
Making a positive difference to young people through pastoral care

Pastoral care in schools across the UK and further afield is proven to be critically linked to the academic and personal-social development of young people. NAPCE continues to support education providers in the process of pastoral care implementation and development. It is here that we share important news of our latest activities, events and best practice guidance. 

FEATURE ARTICLE: Statutory Relationships and Sex Education: What should we make of school protests? Asks NAPCE’s Dr Max Biddulph

Statutory Relationships and Sex Education: What should we make of school protests? By Dr Max Biddulph

In the first major policy shift in the field for almost twenty years, in England and Wales the Department for Education (DfE) is introducing compulsory Relationships Education for primary pupils and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) for secondary pupils from September 2020.

In the detailing of their intention, the DfE (2019) states that:-

“Through these subjects, we want to support all young people to be happy, healthy and safe – we want to equip them for adult life and to make a positive contribution to society”.

The last time Sex and Relationships Education was given an overhaul was in the early 2000s, so this is a long overdue revision given the shifts in societal values and impact that technology is having on many dimensions of daily life. In explaining the process of consultation, the DfE go on to say that:

“A thorough engagement process, involving a public call for evidence and discussions with over 90 organisations, as well as the public consultation on the draft regulations and guidance, has informed the key decisions on these subjects. The consultation received over 11,000 responses from teachers, schools, expert organisations, young people and parents – these responses have helped finalise the statutory guidance as well as the regulations that have been laid in Parliament”.

Interestingly, despite the fact that the new proposals contained in the legislation received support from the majority of MPs in its passage through parliament in April 2019, this curriculum change is proving controversial in some quarters as evidenced by the high volume of correspondence sent to parliamentarians and the protests outside school gates in Birmingham and Nottingham during 2019.

So although this scenario is predictable as historically researchers have conceptualised the field of RSE as a “contested area”, what should we make of this latest turn of events?

Firstly, it’s helpful to scrutinise the objections that underpin the protests which seem to centre on three key issues namely: the feeling that ‘control’ over what is taught has been taken away from parents, fears that RSE will sexualise ‘innocent children and young people’ and objections to the inclusion of LGBT content.

A second characteristic of the school protest phenomenon seems to be that there is a strong presence of individuals from certain faith groups e.g. Muslim community, and that although some parents and children can be found amongst those protesting, there are a significant number of ‘activists’ for whom faith is strongly aligned with identity.

The situation is further complicated by the fact that in the Nottingham protest, there was a counter protest of parents supporting the inclusion of LGBT content. Given the presence of persons of different ethnicities and faith over an issue that has sexualities at its core, I think it is important to examine at a deeper what is in process here.

The expression of identity through “what I am not?” Conservative Islam versus white secular liberalism? The assertion of deeply held values when they seem to under attack? Homophobia and transphobia?

As a former teacher of Sex and Relationships Education myself, I am supportive of statutory RSE as I see it’s potential to empower and don’t see it as contaminating knowledge, rather as a vehicle for learning protective behaviours.

I am speaking from a fairly privileged position of having researched in the field and delivered considerable amounts of professional development on the subject. I state this not because I want to patronise people with the opposing view but to point out that I have developed a nuanced over view and I think this is key to understanding the current impasse.

Writing in The Guardian (6.8.19), Colin Diamond, Professor of Educational Leadership in the University of Birmingham, raises questions about the way that the government has gone about the introduction of this curriculum change pointing out that ‘the DfE was unwilling to discuss how the guidance would play out in complex multi-faith, multi-ethnic schools and communities.

This was a dereliction of duty by ministers’. Historically the agents of dialogue and engagement with faith schools and communities were professionals in former LEAs or sexual health charities such as fpa, who developed considerable expertise and good practice in this area. Sadly both mechanisms are now gone, the former being replaced by academyisation and the latter a victim of austerity.

Diamond goes on to observe that ‘the protests are wrong and have been almost universally condemned for the use of homophobic slogans and harassment outside schools.

Yet some of the language used to describe the situation has also not been helpful. Those who ask questions about the teaching of LGBT awareness in primary schools are not all “homophobic”, or behaving as “bigots” or “extremists” – just some of the labels being thrown around. And neither is this solely a “Muslim issue”. The protests reflect wider concerns from some Christians and Jews too.

Digging deeper, we find communities who feel they have been backed into a corner and judged as not compatible with 21st century British values. Some mainstream Muslim school leaders in Birmingham (also) feel marginalised’.

So, the battle lines are drawn and in October 2019, the government  issued new advice to local authorities on dealing with protests outside schools over LGBT-inclusive teaching.

There is a lot at stake here including the wider project of pastoral care in education. RSE is part of the wider reform of PSHE and includes an important new initiative to support the mental well-being of children and young people.

Perhaps this is the avenue to find the common ground to begin a dialogue and Diamond helpfully steers us to UNICEFs ‘Rights of the Child’. This is an important moment in the story of RSE that is proving painful and damaging for people on all sides.

I hope some dialogue and reconciliation can begin soon.

Dr Max Biddulph
NEC Officer
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

ENTER NOW: NAPCE launches awards event to celebrate pastoral care work in schools

NAPCE is delighted to have joined forces with UK Pastoral Chat to launch an exciting new awards scheme for pastoral care providers in the education sector.

This is the first time ever an event has being organised to recognise the fantastic achievements across schools in the UK on pastoral care.

It has been created to provide much deserved recognition to the people and schools who are doing great work and to shine a light on good practice in pastoral care.

There are seven categories to enter in the NAPCE Awards and 11 under the UK Pastoral Chat scheme.

Entry for both sets of awards is separate, although the closing date for both is Monday 2nd March, 2020.

Both organisations will work in partnership to organise the first ever National Awards for Pastoral Care in Education under one awards ceremony which will take place in 2020.

You can enter the NAPCE awards now here: https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/zxzr4y71g2ofzi/

NAPCE is inviting nominations in the following categories;

  • Pastoral School of the Year
  • Pastoral Team of the Year
  • Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year
  • Pastoral Leader of the Year
  • Pastoral Development of the Year
  • Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care
  • Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care

Nominations are encouraged for awards in different categories from schools and educational institutions.

UK Pastoral Chat is inviting nominations for awards in the following categories;

  • SLT
  • Head of Year (Including Head of 6thForm)
  • Head of House/Head of Boarding
  • PSHE Lead
  • Nurse/ Counsellor
  • Pastoral Support Staff (including Learning Mentor)
  • Tutor/Classroom teacher
  • Unsung Hero
  • Guidance teacher
  • DSL/CP Co-ordinator
  • Governor

Details about how to make nominations can be found on the UK Pastoral Chat Twitter pages.

The Awards will be an excellent opportunity to share good practice in pastoral care and through the social media and websites of both organisations to raise awareness of where pastoral support is making a real difference in the educational experience of young people.

The awards will encourage new initiatives and ideas in pastoral care and will recognise the contributions being made to developing policy and practice in pastoral support.

This is an opportunity to recognise the impact the work of pastoral staff is having on the achievement and well being of young people. The decisions about prize winners in each category will be made by a panel of invited professionals who work in pastoral care.

There will be a prize of £100.00 for the school or institution for the winners of each category and individuals will also be recognised for their achievements.

The criteria for the NAPCE awards are;
Award Criteria

  • Pastoral School of the Year

A school that can demonstrate a commitment to pastoral care and support for learners that makes a real difference in the progress and personal development of young people in the school

  • Pastoral Team of the Year

A team that works in pastoral care and can demonstrate a determination to support young people to achieve their full potential and a positive impact on the young people they work with.

  • Pastoral Member of Staff of the Year

A member of staff who works in pastoral care and who always makes the extra effort to support young people to enable them to become effective learners and achieve success.

  • Pastoral Leader of the Year

Has a passion for pastoral care that is shared with colleagues to inspire and motivate them to make a real difference in the lives of the young people they work with.

  • Pastoral Development of the Year

A pastoral initiative or idea that has achieved positive outcomes and has improved the learning experience and future life chances, for young people.

  • Raising Awareness about Pastoral Care

An individual, group or organisation who through their actions have raised awareness about pastoral care or pastoral issues and encouraged positive improvements for the benefit of young people.

  • Outstanding Contribution to Pastoral Care

A person, group or organisation that has made a real difference for the benefit of young people in the area of pastoral care.Nominations for the NAPCE Awards are welcome from member schools and institutions and from schools and institutions that are not currently members of NAPCE.

Nominations can be made online via this link:

https://napceawards.wufoo.com/forms/zxzr4y71g2ofzi/

You can also enter by e-mail to NAPCE Base at admin@napce.org.uk or they can be sent by post to National Association for Pastoral Care in Education, (NAPCE), PO BOX 60005, Nuneaton, CV11 9GY, with the following information:

Award                          __________________________________________

Nomination                  __________________________________________
Support for nomination (maximum 100 words)

Nominated by _______________________________________________

Email contact _______________________________________________

The Awards Programme and partnership with UK Pastoral Chat is an exciting opportunity to raise the profile of Pastoral Care and give hard working pastoral staff and schools with positive approaches to supporting learners the recognition that they deserve.

Please be part of this process by sending your nominations.

Phil Jones
National Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education

ARTICLE: In the aftermath of Anti-Bullying Week 2019, NAPCE have shared a practical classroom exercise to engage students in this difficult subject

 

As part of NAPCE’s support for Anti-Bullying Week 2019 (November 11-15, 2019) our Chair, Phil Jones, shared a collection of practical in-school activities to help students and staff explore and understand the line between bullying and banter.

Each of these scenarios have been created to engage young people in the thought process behind activities which could cross the line with an overall view to encourage contemplation and adjusted behaviour outcomes.

We encourage educators to adopt this practice session within a classroom environment and would very much welcome any reported outcomes send to admin@napce.org.uk

Bullying or Banter? Classroom activities to make a difference by Phil Jones, Chair of NAPCE

  • Organise the class into groups of 5 or 6 students.
  • Ask students to organise themselves into roles for example:
  • Chair (who organises the meeting)
  • Secretary (who records any decisions made)
  • Timekeeper (who makes sure that the team are on task to meet the deadline)
  • Ask the team to agree three rules for their discussion
  • Hand out the scenarios.
  • To add challenge and pace to the activity give the teams a deadline for completing each scenario.
  • Ask for feedback from each team on the decisions they have made when the deadline is reached for each scenario.
  • Give points to the team depending on the quality of their response and how well they explain their views. Perhaps a prize for the best team.
  • Extension activity would be to come up with five rules for preventing misunderstandings between bullying and banter.
  • Team can evaluate how well they worked together and how well they considered all the issues.

SCENARIO A 

A is a goalkeeper in a football team. A is a good goalkeeper and is respected for making important saves in matches. In one important cup match A makes three big mistakes which all lead to goals for their opponents and they lose the match 3 goals to two. As A come off the pitch some members of the team tell A that they were useless today and that it is their fault that they lost. In the evening A gets a text message saying that the team needs a new goalkeeper. A decides that they will not play football again.

  1. Was this banter or bullying?
  2. Is A being too sensitive?
  3. What could A do about the situation?
  4. What could anybody else do about the situation?

SCENARIO B

B is asked to go to a gig at a local nightclub by a group of friends from school. When B asks their parents, they say no because they think B is too young and they have heard rumours that there are drugs at this nightclub. B explains this to their friends, but they just respond by saying that B is ‘scared’ of their parents and that they should ignore them and just go anyway. Later, that evening one of the friends posts a picture of a chicken on social media with the question does anybody recognise this person?

  1. Is this bullying or banter?
  2. What could go wrong?
  3. What should B do?
  4. What could anybody else do to help resolve the situation.

SCENARIO C 

C has just started their first job working in an office. They are very nervous on their first day and do not want to do anything wrong. They are not sure what happens at lunchtime, so they take sandwiches in a Tupperware box. At lunchtime everybody in the office agrees to go out for lunch. Everybody starts laughing when they see that C has got their sandwiches out to eat. They make fun of C and say look at ‘Tups’, who cannot afford to buy a lunch and similar comments. They go out and leave C behind. In the afternoon everybody ignores C apart form a note which suddenly appears on their desk which says, “give some money now for starving workers’. C decides that they are going to give the job up.

  1. Is this bullying or banter?
  2. What has caused this situation?
  3. What could C do about the situation?
  4. What could anybody else do about the situation?

SCENARIO D 

D enjoys listening to classical music and does not like modern music. They have just started their first job after leaving school and enjoys having the money to be able to go out for meals. On a visit to a restaurant with their four closest friends form school a local rock band is playing. D makes a comment that the band is rubbish and the restaurant would be better to have a musician playing a violin. The friends laugh and say that he is not living in the real world and make comments about D being boring.  Later that evening D finds out from social media that his four friends are going to a rock concert and he has not been invited. D decides that he is going to tell his friend that they are unable to appreciate good music and he doesn’t want to see them again.

  1. Is this bullying or banter?
  2. How could this situation have been avoided?
  3. What could D do to improve the situation
  4. What could anybody else do about the situation?

The scenarios will encourage teams to consider different perceptions about situations and what is the intent of the people involved. They will need to think about how situations can be prevented form becoming a problem and how people need to use empathy and sensitivity to resolve them. The organisation of the activity will provide opportunities for students to learn how to work in teams, how to contribute their ideas and to develop their listening and communication skills.

MEDIA WATCH: A round-up of the latest news stories involving pastoral care in education

At NAPCE we work very hard to stay across the national and international news media to store and share the latest stories involving pastoral care in education on our own platforms.

In this new feature for NAPCE News, we are sharing with you a selection of the biggest stories hitting the headlines this month with the aim that some of these reported developments may provide useful context within your work as a strategist or practitioner of pastoral support.

Here is a summary for November 2019.

“Self-harm: Girls ‘more likely to end up in hospital'” from BBC News

Read here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-50211831

“Councils dealing with more children at risk of gang involvement and trafficking” from The Guardian

Read here: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/oct/31/social-services-see-30-rise-in-children-seeking-asylum

“Domestic abuse ‘biggest threat to child protection'” from BBC News

Read here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-50294046

“Bullying: Fifth of young people in UK have been victims in past year – report” from BBC News

Read here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-50370667

“Teen self-harm rates are dramatically down in Denmark – here’s why” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/teen-self-harm-rates-down-denmark-mental-health-suicide-a9181561.html

“Teachers ‘need more training’ to combat sexual abuse” from TES

Read here: https://www.tes.com/news/teachers-need-more-training-combat-sexual-abuse

“We are sleepwalking into a student self-esteem crisis” from TES

Read here: https://www.tes.com/news/we-are-sleepwalking-student-self-esteem-crisis

“Children who rarely eat breakfast secure lower GCSE grades than classmates, study finds” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/breakfast-school-gcse-grades-children-austerity-leeds-university-a9209131.html

“One in seven children develop a mental illness, claims new research” from The Independent

Read here: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/children-mental-illness-research-depression-anxiety-young-people-a9210926.html

“Sharp rise in pupil numbers in special schools
DfE figures show special school population has risen by 6 per cent in a year” from TES

Read here: https://www.tes.com/news/sharp-rise-pupil-numbers-special-schools

NAPCE May Conference 2019 – A Report

Conference- “Facing the Challenges of mental health and well-being in schools. Let’s talk about it!”

May 8th, 2019, Birmingham

Summary of Analysis of Evaluations from Delegates

Delegates completed a questionnaire to provide feedback at the end of the conference. There were 85 delegates at the conference. The responses to the evaluation show that delegates came from a wide range of backgrounds including primary school teachers, secondary school teachers, headteachers and leaders in secondary schools, non – teaching pastoral staff in schools, people working in higher education, people working in teacher training and organisations that included the Wildlife Trust, BBC Bitesize and Aston Villa Foundation. Speakers came from Birmingham Educational Partnership, Newman University, Ofsted, ASCL, Mind, Squirrel learning, Compassion Matters, Newman Health and Well-being, and NAPCE. In addition, displays were provided by the Thrive Approach and Services for Education

Delegates were positive about the experience they had at the conference and about how they had benefited from attending.  The comments show that delegates found the conference useful and that the information that was shared with them and the understanding they developed, would have a positive impact on their future work

  • It was really informative and lots of ideas to take back to school
  • Great update on national picture and progression and hurdles with mental health in schools and wider society
  • Lots of information to think about and incorporate into our academy
  • I learnt so much and it gave me time to start formulating my thoughts so I can start preparing my action plan
  • Very informative, Thought provoking and inspiring
  • So much knowledge to take back home to think about and share at work
  • The information given today can only help me and the staff I work with to support the young people we work with and each other
  • Helped me to focus on the national picture not just my school setting. Gave me time to think and network with others.

One theme that emerged from the conference was the importance of a whole school approach to promoting mental health and well-being in schools.

  • Raising awareness about the need for a whole school response to emotional well being
  • It raised awareness about the importance of a whole school approach to mental health issues and well-being in schools.
  • It has helped me to think about the importance of a whole school approach
  • Learning new approaches to developing a whole school approach.

Delegates appreciated the different information presented, with speakers focusing on current practice, national issues and developments, research and ideas and strategies to respond to the challenges that schools face.

  • I thought the balance of information was good
  • Great update on national picture and progression and hurdles with mental health in schools and wider society
  • Range of ideas to take back to school and implement
  • Lots of information to think about and incorporate into our academy
  • Made connections between different models of pastoral care and current practice learnt about the most up to date evidence and policy

Delegates were positive about the knowledge and understanding they gained from the speakers and workshop leaders. Without exception all the speakers and workshop leaders were mentioned as being the highlight of the conference by different delegates.

  • Wide range of speakers all relevant to theme but providing different perspectives
  • The speakers created a whole picture of what we need to strive for. It all fitted together
  • Each speaker contributed to my understanding and each one had a highlight. A Valuable day
  • The wide range of speakers that brought different perspectives to the table
  • Different speakers from different areas of expertise
  • I found all the speakers and the workshops to be of great interest

Delegates feedback about the venue for the Conference, The Studio in Birmingham was very positive. They liked the location especially because it was close to the station and the food and facilities. There were a few comments about it being difficult to get to central Birmingham by car for a 9-00am start.

  • Excellent regarding room and food. Busy getting into central Birmingham for 9-00am
  • Great venue and food
  • The venue was perfect for the event
  • Excellent venue, nice food, great location
  • Very accessible. Clean tidy and fabulous hospitality
  • Amazing venue. Good facilities, good food, quirky design and excellent location close to the station

Delegates were positive about NAPCE’s organisation of the event. Suggestions for the organisation of future conferences included, providing more time for delegates to discuss issues and share good practice and to ask questions and make comments. The responses show that delegates valued the opportunity to network and share ideas and good practice with other delegates.

  • Nothing needs to be done to improve the conference. all was excellent
  • The organisation of the conference was very thorough
  • Arrange further conferences they are excellent
  • I thought the balance of information was good and at a very reasonable price.
  • NAPCE is addressing important areas and kept the conference interesting
  • The organisation of the conference was all very clear, and the conference fulfilled its aims effectively
  • More discussion time, but I did appreciate the breadth of content and appreciate time constraints
  • Provide time for delegates to talk and discuss. To comment and ask questions after each presentation
  • More time to talk in workshops
  • Workshops to be more interactive. More practical ideas and strategies
  • More practical ways and strategies that we can use for our pupils e.g. signs of mental health issues, various types of condition and ways to support
  • Opportunities for networking and sharing free resources, as schools do not have the money for lots of these things
  • Opportunities to share good practice on tables
  • Maybe more resources or an information sheet on where to find support

Delegates made some suggestions for issues and topics that could be explored in future conferences.

  • More about strategic approaches in school
  • Mental Health strategies to use in the classroom
  • Working with pupils with SEND
  • Supporting disaffected/alienated pupils
  • Case studies and best practice as group discussions
  • Use of pupil premium funding to support pastoral care. Links between pastoral needs and wider SEND needs
  • Relationships with parents
  • Managing pastoral care in a digital environment including social media
  • Developing Pastoral teams. Good practice models.

Delegates made the following general comments about their experience at the conference.

  • I really enjoyed the day and found it to be wholly engaging
  • Enjoyable and informative day. Thank you and very good value for money
  • A useful and stimulating day
  • I found it all very useful and well planned. A valuable day
  • Thank you for a very positive day
  • Fantastic day Very appropriate that the conference related to mental health. I have felt very valued and left the venue feeling very much looked after. Thank you
  • An enjoyable and useful day
  • Well done to all involved it was fantastic
  • Brilliant Day. Thoroughly enjoyable and informative

Thank you to all speakers, workshop leaders, organisers of displays, staff at The Studio NAPCE members and all delegates for your contribution to the success of the conference.

Phil Jones
National Chair
National Association for Pastoral Care in Education (NAPCE)

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